Doctoring

Doctoring is a required two-year, four-course program that combines instruction and assessment in both clinical skills and professional development. 

The doctoring curriculum comprises classroom learning and early exposure to real patients and medical practice. Students attend small group sessions taught by medical (MD) and social and behavioral science (SBS) faculty. Together with standardized patients in a simulated exam room setting, faculty teach students basic clinical skills, including medical interviewing, history taking, and physical diagnosis, while emphasizing professional conduct.

Skills learned in the classroom are reinforced by clinical experiences in which students work alongside physician-mentors at a community-based practice for 14 half days per year - observing doctor patient interactions and applying the skills they will need as physicians. In addition, students are assigned an assisted living facility (ALF) resident in the community with whom they can practice clinical skills.

Year 1

Doctoring I and II

Year 1 focuses on real patients and real doctors with an emphasis on working with health care teams. Students observe their physician-mentor interact with real patients and practice their medical interviewing and physical diagnosis skills.

  • Medical interviewing  
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Physical diagnosis
  • Oral case presentation
  • Written documentation skills
  • Professionalism/ethics
  • Culturally sensitive care
  • Assisted Living Facility (ALF) Curriculum: 5 half-day sessions during the year (2 visits in the fall and 3 in the spring). Individual students are matched with individual ALF residents for clinical skills practice.     

Year 2

Doctoring III and IV

The goals and objectives of the mentor program in Year 2 focus on clinical skills practice in the context of a health care team. Students interact with patients at their Doctoring mentor site and complete case write-ups and field notes based on real clinical experiences.

  • Medical interviewing  
  • Physical diagnosis
  • Oral case presentation
  • Written documentation skills
  • Professionalism/ethics
  • Culturally sensitive care
  • Clinical reasoning