Graduate Students

The Program in Medieval Studies does not have its own graduate program but it supports the graduate students from other departments working in the period. Below is a list of people who form a group of MS grad students.

Current graduate students working in the field of Medieval Studies:

Paul Aste  - History
Julia Balakrishnan - History

Benjamin Easton  (Hispanic Studies). Ben is originally from Akron, Ohio. He received his BA in Spanish and English Literature from the University of Notre Dame (2018) and an MA in Iberian and Latin American Literatures (2019). His research deals primarily with the institutional construction of imperial subjects as represented in Early Modern Iberian Literature, with a special interest in the picaresque novel.

Mikail Berg - Religious Studies

Laura Chilson-Parks (History of Art and Architecture) studies the architectural history and archaeology of the Middle Ages. Her primary research reconstructs the role of Margaret of Flanders within the 14th-century alterations to the Burgundian ducal residences. Her approach to patronage is comprehensive, including in its scope the fortification, furnishings, agricultural technologies, gardens, and livestock of her case studies. She also studies the accommodation of lay individuals in medieval and early modern charterhouses and has excavated with Sheila Bonde and Clark Maines at the Chartreuse de Bourgfontaine in Villers-Cotterêts, France. Laura received her B.A. with honors from Wellesley College in 2011, where she studied anthropology and archaeology. Before arriving at Brown, she attended the Achill Archaeological Field School in Ireland and worked at Old Sturbridge Village in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. 

Sarah Christensen - History

Benjamin Driver (Classics). Benjamin Driver received his B.A. in Classics from Dartmouth College in 2013. After this, he taught middle and high school Latin and French for five years. While teaching he became interested in the Neo-Latin of the Renaissance and Early Modern period, especially via the lens of Classical reception. He noticed a particular dearth of commentaries on these texts, which was the impetus for his return to the academy as a member of Brown University’s Department of Classics. His research interests include Latin prose, Classical reception, rhetoric, style, and the rise of the novel.

Benjamin Easton  (Hispanic Studies). Ben is originally from Akron, Ohio. He received his BA in Spanish and English Literature from the University of Notre Dame (2018) and an MA in Iberian and Latin American Literatures (2019). His research deals primarily with the institutional construction of imperial subjects as represented in Early Modern Iberian Literature, with a special interest in the picaresque novel.

Tamar Golinsky (History)

Alba Lara Granero (Hispanic Studies) is a Ph.D. student from Spain. She holds both a B.A. in Spanish philology (2011) and a M.A.T. (2012) from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. After three years devoted to secondary education, she was awarded an Iowa Arts Fellowship to pursue an M.F.A. in Spanish Creative Writing (2016) at the University of Iowa. Her current research interests include women's writing, feminism, critical theory, medieval and early modern female authors, and literary theory.

Tara Holman - English

Christopher Lasasso (English). Christopher’s research focuses on early modern European conceptions of the sea, with a particular focus on English colonial and imperial trade, travel, and expansion throughout the circum-Caribbean in the 16th and 17th centuries. Their interests lie with all of that which lies submerged, drowned, and seemingly forgotten beneath the eater’s surface, as well as the epistemological and ontological consequences that follow the salvaging and dredging up of these histories in order to rectify the terrestrial biases of early modern studies and it's most privileged archives.

Fosca Maddaloni - History of Art and Architecture
Steven Manuel - Comparative Literature

Stacey Murrell (History) is
 working on medieval Iberia, North Africa, and Sicily. Her research interests include the relationship(s) between gender, sexuality, and power, and her current project explores the politics of concubinage. She is also interested in material and visual culture and the ways in which the public engages with the past, and has worked at the Oriental Institute and the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art. She earned her B.A in History, Political Science, and Educational Studies from Macalester College and her M.A. in History from the University of Chicago.

Sandra Huaringa Niño is a Ph.D. student of Hispanic Studies from Peru. She holds a BA in Hispanic Literature from Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú and a MSt in Modern Languages from the University of Oxford. Her current academic interests are Women’s Writing of the Golden Age period, the dramatic work of Lope de Vega and the relations between Elizabethan theatre and the Spanish comedia nueva.

Regina Noto - History of Art and Architecture

David Parsard (Hispanic Studies). David is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Hispanic Studies. From Brooklyn, New York, he received both his B.A. and M.A. in Spanish language and literature from CUNY Hunter College. Written on Feliciano de Silva’s Amadís de Grecia, David’s master’s thesis explored crossdressing and neoplatonic love in the chivalric context. Currently, David is interested in the metatextual relationships of the libros de caballerías as well as in their reception across Europe and the Americas.

Chenyu Tu - Comparative Literature
Preston Walker - Classics