Courses - Spring 2016

Modern Greek Studies offers a variety of courses each semester. There are seven semesters of language teaching, as well as courses in comparative literature, Byzantine Literature and history. Courses taught in anthropology or other departments will be cross listed with Modern Greek when they are taught. 

Language Courses

Introduction to Modern Greek

A continuation of MGRK 0100. New students may palce into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. The course continues on an integrative skills approach and aims to develop language skills, within a framework of specific topics and functions. The course objectives are to enable students to perform a range of tasks, master a minimum core vocabulary and acquire knowledge and understanding of various forms of Greek culture.

MGRK 0200 S01

 

Primary Instructor:

Amanatidou

Intermediate Modern Greek

A continuation of MGRK 0300. New students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. It aims to enchance language skills within a variety of registers and themes; enable the students to master, use and understand effectively essential linguistic structures; examine a variety of expressive forms within an authentic cultural context.

 

 

 

MGRK 0400 S01

 

Primary Instructor:

Amanatidou

Advanced Modern Greek

A continuation of MGRK 0500. Students who have not taken the previous sequence may take a placement test, after consultation with the instructor. The course aims to promote range, accuracy and fluency and enable students to develop ease and spontaneity with the language. Authentic materials drawn from a range of sources inform the content of the course and include films, literature, media, testimonies, music and internet based sources. The development of transcultural competence will be an essential component of the course.

MGRK MGRK0600 S01

Primary Instructor: Amanatidou

Special Topics in Modern Greek

No description available.

MGRK 1910 S01

Primary Instructor: Amanatidou

 

Classic Courses

Erotic Desire in the Premodern Mediterranean

Erotic desire may be a universal human phenomenon. How we explain, depict, express, or experience desire is, however, not a universal, uniform matter. The premodern Mediterranean (from roughly the fifth century BCE to the fifteenth century CE) gives us a variety of form of sexual experience and expression. We will study the history of these forms through texts, images and objects: from Platonic love or eros to Roman tales of romance, from Judeo-Christian mysticism to Islamic literature, from sexual diets to erotic amulets. Enrollment limited to 25.

CLAS 1750L S01

 

Primary Instructor:

Papaioannou

Greek Palaeography and Premodern Book Cultures

Introduction to pre-modern Greek book culture and the study of Greek literary scripts from classical antiquity to the Renaissance. Students become acquainted with the history of books, the context and agents of their production, and the transmission of Greek (classical as well as post-classical) literature. Training is provided in reading and dating different scripts and in editing ancient texts.

 

GREK 2110F S01

 

Primary Instructor:

Papaioannou


Comparative Literature Courses

Comparative Literature - Literatures of Immigration

Why do people migrate? How do literary genes, including poetry, fiction, autobiography and memoir, characterize immigrant experiences? How is the experience of  “coming from somewhere else” similar and different for each subsequent generation of immigrants? How does literature indicate the impacts of migration on the culture, politics and economics of the countries of immigration and emigration? How do literatures and other narratives of immigration, especially as represented in film, imagine the past, present and future of networks and communities of immigrants? Focusing in twentieth-century literary and filmic texts against the socio-historical context of mass migration, the first half of the course examines immigration literature in the U.S., the second half of the course explores literatures of immigration beyond the U. S. In its current incarnation, the course will focus on immigration in Europe and its effects. The course concludes with and inquiry into immigration in our presently globalizing age.

COLT1812A-S01

Tuesday-Thrusday 10:30 a.m – 11:50 a.m., Marston 209

 

Primary Instructor:

Vangelis Calotychos

Mediterranean Fictions: On Debts, Crises, and the Ends of Europe

Sun-drenched, seductive, and timeless, the Mediterranean is an appealing location from which to ponder Europe’s debt to this cradle of western civilization. Recently, the region’s economic debt crisis has crystallized thoughts that, beginning here, a peaceful, unified Europe will come undone or be rehabilitated. The word ‘crisis’ itself hinges on a making a crucial decision, often in marking the turning point of a disease. This course examines representations of this moment through literature and film-but also in history, anthropology, journalism, and art-and in the context of other pivotal twentieth-century Mediterranean texts that marked, and anticipated, seismic shifts on the continent. Texts include works by Lanthimos, Camus, Daoud, Haneke, Carlotto, Sorrentino, Rosales, Pamuk, IKonomou, Balibar, Varoufakis.

COLT 1412T

Tuesday 4:00 – 6:30 p.m

 111 Thayer Street; Waston Institute, Room 116

 Primary Instructor:

Vangelis Calotychos