Pre-College Programs

Course Catalog Search Results (14)

Remixing Racial Codes: Interraciality in Literature and Film Post-1945

Through a reading of select critical theory, literary texts, and films, students will look critically at the ways in which interracial relationships have been prescribed and figured in U.S. culture post-1945. Decentering the dominant narrative of black-white miscegenation, we will give equal attention to the role that Asian bodies play in complicating this binary. We will...

Learn More

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

This course provides an introduction to cultural anthropology, surveying its defining questions, methods, and findings. We will examine the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, the long-term immersion of the researcher in the culture under study. We will compare cultural anthropology's findings and comportment in other cultures to its conclusions and conduct in our own.

No prerequisites.

Learn More

Racial Politics of Culture: Race and Indigeneity in Anthropology

Taking its title from Lee D. Baker's Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, this course aims to understand anthropological approaches to race and indigeneity. We'll focus on ethnographic work from a range of ethnographic contexts in order to consider the complexities of race and indigeneity as both analytical concepts and ethnographic...

Learn More

Sex, Gender, and Subversion: An Introduction to Queer Anthropology

From sex between straight men in fraternities to young girls dedicated to and raised as ‘husbands’ of a goddess, we will explore practices of gender and sexuality that run counter to heterosexual and cisgender norms. Through ethnographies, media, and lively class discussions, this course offers an introduction to issues of gender and sexual subversion globally...

Learn More

The Idea of Self

Literature gestures us toward a certain kind of knowledge not quite psychological, not quite philosophical. We read widely in the classical and medieval traditions in order to gauge the peculiar nature of what this knowledge tells us about experience and the ways in which expressions of selfhood abide or are changed over time. Authors include but are not limited to Sappho, Pindar, Catullus, Horace, Augustine, and Fortunatus.

Learn More

Good, Evil, and Inbetween

Are humans born naturally good, evil, neither, or all of the above? Does evil lurk deep within the heart of all that is good, or can the forces of good eradicate those of evil? Is evil an inextricable part of what it means to be human in the first place? We'll examine these and related questions by reading some especially provocative literature, including Frankenstein,...

Learn More

Funny/Not Funny: Taking Comedy Seriously

What does comedy do, and how does it work? How does comedy compel us to confront matters of great urgency? We consider these questions by examining satire, slapstick, sitcom, sketch comedy, and standup in Jonathan Swift, P.G. Wodehouse, Dorothy Parker, Martin Amis, Fran Lebowitz, Paul Beatty, Sherman Alexie, Richard Pryor, Amy Schumer, Louis C.K., Jon Stewart, and Wanda Sykes.

Learn More

Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays....

Learn More

The American Civil War

In this course we will investigate the "felt histories" of the American Civil War -- the personal experiences of Americans (northerners and southerners, slaves and freed people, European immigrants and Native Americans, men and women) who fought its battles and bore its consequences. These histories, as Robert Penn Warren notes, are an "index to the very complexity,...

Learn More

The Romans

The Romans established the only successful pan-Mediterranean empire in history, lasting nearly 1,000 years, with its legacy living everywhere today, from the U.S. Constitution to the English alphabet. Who were these people? How did they ever conquer and maintain such a vast territory and for so long? And what did it mean to be a Roman? This course explores these basic, yet...

Learn More

Evil: The History of an Idea

This course considers how individuals and societies have constructed the idea of evil. We examine evil’s origins in religious traditions and review how those interpretations have been deployed and how the concept of evil has changed over time. Is it possible to offer a universal definition of evil? Is it true that “When a woman thinks alone, she thinks evil?”...

Learn More

Classic Short Stories

This course will introduce you to a selection of works by important writers of the short story. We shall explore the richness and diversity of short fiction through close reading and discussion, both of which should give you an appreciation of the short story in general and of our writers' countries and histories in particular. Our focus will be on authorial strategies...

Learn More

Harmonic Convergence: Music's Intersection with Science, Mathematics, History and Literature

An examination of research on music and the brain; connections between music, mathematics and history; and music's interrelationship with literature. Readings include The Power of Music (Mannes), Musicophilia (Sacks), The Kreutzer Sonata (Tolstoy), Doctor Faustus (Mann), A Clockwork Orange (Burgess), and writings by Morike, Hofstadter, Vaget, and Taruskin, in which...

Learn More

Persuasive Communication

Provides an introduction to public speaking, and helps students develop confidence in public speaking through the presentation of persuasive speeches. Limited to 18.

Learn More