Child lead exposure study finds substantial reductions possible

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — New data from a long-term study of 355 mothers and their children found that fixing peeling paint and removing other household sources of lead during the mother’s pregnancy can reduce levels of dust lead in homes to levels significantly lower than previously deemed achievable.

“There is no safe level of lead,” said Joseph Braun, associate professor of epidemiology at Brown University’s School of Public Health and lead author on the study. “We were able to achieve dust lead levels considerably lower than the current EPA standards for lead remediation and at levels where far fewer children are at risk of being lead-poisoned in their homes.”

The JAMA Pediatrics paper, published today, was part of the Health Outcomes and Measures of the Environment (HOME) study in Cincinnati, Ohio, which followed a group of mothers and their children from the city since pregnancy, beginning in 2003. READ MORE