Events Archive

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Narragansett Food Sovereignty Initiative

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Cassius Spears (Knowledge Keeper, Narragansett Tribal Member) will discuss his work with the Narragansett Food Sovereignty Initiative at Crandall Minacommuck Farm in Westerly, RI, a parcel of land owned by the Narragansett Tribe. The Initiative is developing community gardens, individual lease gardens, a farm stand, a historic farm museum, and educational trails.

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Siempre Esperando: Remittances and their False Promises in El Salvador

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Garage Gallery

Two million Salvadorans living in the U.S. send home $2.8 billion, or 16.6% of El Salvador’s GDP. This exhibit demonstrates that remittances are a crucial component of a much larger story that places El Salvador within theoretical frameworks of migration, transnationalism, and U.S. Empire.

Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm

Closed on Weekends and Holdays

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibitions

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Exhibition: Map It Out Providence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Gallery

Map It Out – Providence (September 26 – November 14) is an exhibition of hand-drawn maps created by Providence and Rhode Island community members in collaboration with the Toronto-based artists Gwen MacGregor and Sandra Rechico. The maps reveal our community’s memories, and propose new ways of understanding the geography of our city and state. Exhibition attendees are welcome to add their own maps to the exhibition.

Conferences

Radical Cartography Now: Digital, Artistic and Social Justice Approaches to Mapping

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Room 201

In the public humanities, counter-mapping and “radical cartography” are emerging as powerful tools to critique institutional authority and imagine alternative ways of thinking about place.

Lectures

Refusing to See

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Artist and designer Rosten Woo discusses public projects in New York and Los Angeles that interpret spaces that are willfully unseen by those in power. Stories from Brooklyn’s Fulton Mall to Los Angeles’ Willowbrook and Little Tokyo will deal with themes of race, retail, urban development, public memory, and systems of value.

Pages