Lectures

Past Lectures

  • A Special Lecture by Liz Ševčenko, founder and director of the Guantánamo Public Memory Project, coordinated at Columbia University
    (opening event for the Master’s in Public Humanities Program Open House)
    “Guantánamo” has become an international symbol of America’s “War on Terror,” but it’s been an integral part of American politics and policy for more than a century, used to contain a wide range of people perceived as threats: base workers accused of espionage in the Cold War; Haitian refugees with HIV in the early days of AIDS; and suspected “enemy combatants.” Its “legal black hole” has been a laboratory for developing new approaches to immigration, public health, national security, and other issues outside existing US law.
    Guantánamo Public Memory Project is working to build public awareness of the long history of the US naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba – before and after 9-11 – and facilitate dialogue on the future of this place, its people, and its policies. Through a collaboration involving Brown and 10 other university’s public humanities programs, students and their communities from Miami to Minnesota are developing a traveling exhibit, web platform, and mobile-phone response strategy to connect local perspectives into a national conversation. The talk will explore the potential and pitfalls of collaborating across difference to confront deeply contested histories.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Feb
    13
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    A Critical Approach to Storytelling for the Science World

    Science Center, 3rd floor Sciences Library
    Question and answer session on communicating serious issues with humor and art. Guests marine biologist turned filmmaker Randy Abrams and Cool Globes founder Wendy Abrams.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Feb
    13
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    A Critical Approach to Storytelling for the Science World

    Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium
    Randy Olson left a tenured academic position to start over in filmmaking and shared the lessons he learned in his book “Don’t be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in an Age of Style.” In addition to his films, he also conducts workshops on effective science communication for the National Park Service, universities and NGOs. Get the capsule version (and lunch) on:
    Wednesday, Feb 13 at noon in the Science Center (third floor of the science library).
    Funded through the generosity of the Wendy and James Abrams Fund for Environmental Education
    Sponsored by ECI, CES, Departments of Geological Sciences, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, History, and the John Nicholas Brown Center.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Feb
    15
    10:00am - 3:00pm

    First Person Interpretation in Theory and Practice

    Nightingale-Brown House
    This interactive workshop will offer a variety of perspectives on First Person interpretation as a Museum teaching tool. We will spend some time considering the theory and benefits/shortcomings of first person, as well as the variety of living history models currently practiced in Museums. Then, using our content and model at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, we will engage in the process of developing a first-person persona, and participate in a multi-sensory character-building workshop. We will also focus on how to shift a third-person program or space into the first person, and the ways in which educators can incorporate elements of first-person interpretation and role play to strengthen the emotional dimension of a third-person narration.
    Sarah Litvin is the Senior Education Associate for Exhibit Development at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum. She has worked in public history since receiving her B.A. from Oberlin College in 2007. As Oral Historian at the Institute of Southern Jewish Life, she traveled the South interviewing Jewish community members and managing an audio-visual archive of their stories. At the Tenement Museum, she directs living history and accessibility. She has tripled the size of the Museum’s living history programming by creating three new programs, and has presented on the Tenement model at several national conferences. She was also a project team member for the Museum’s newest permanent exhibit, Shop Life, which opened in December, 2012. In addition to her Museum work, Sarah is a free-lance journalist, and has been published by the Jackson Free Press, English- and Yiddish-language Jewish Forward and the New York Jewish Week.
    This workshop is open to the public and registration is required. Registration fee is waived for Brown and RISD Students.
    This workshop is part of the Public Humanities Professional Development Series. https://payment.brown.edu/C20460_ustores/web/store_cat.jsp?STOREID=17&CATID=218&SINGLESTORE=true
    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    5
    10:00am - 3:00pm

    Stewardship at the Campaign Crossroads

    CareerLAB
    (A workshop in the Public Humanities Professional Development Series)
    A fundraising campaign can be transformative for a nonprofit organization. Entering or exiting a campaign is an excellent time to assess your stewardship and donor relations program, to fix what doesn’t work and introduce new ideas. Let’s talk about how to take advantage of pre- and post-campaign periods to plan for new directions in stewardship and donor relations. We’ll look at specific ideas that can make a difference in attracting, engaging, and sustaining important donor relationships throughout and after a campaign. Bring your ideas and questions to enliven the discussion.
    Bio statement:
    Julia Emlen serves a director of development for Providence’s Community MusicWorks. She is also the principal of Julia S. Emlen Associates. She has more than twenty year’s experience in advancement across the non-profit spectrum. She has consulted on resource development with non-profit organizations in secondary and higher education, land conservation, health care and the arts. She is a frequent presenter at AFP and CASE conferences, and has chaired the CASE Annual Meeting for Donor Relations and Stewardship. She is the author of Intentional Stewardship: Bringing Your Donors to Their Highest Level of Philanthropy (CASE, 2007) and holds the CASE Crystal Apple Award for Teaching Excellence. She is a CASE Educational Partner and a member of the Association of Donor Relations Professionals.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    6
    9:30am - 11:00am

    Academic Blogging, a Master Class

    CareerLAB
    This session follows from the “You won’t get Scooped” workshop that
    was held last semester, facilitated by Digital Humanities LibrariansJean Bauer and Elli Mylonas. In the earlier workshop, we discussed how to
    develop a professional persona online, and how to present yourself and
    your work using blogs and photo streams, and other social software.
    In this session, we’ll provide a brief review (if necessary) and then
    walk through setting up a blog and making an introductory post. Wewill also take the time to look at some examples, in order to identifyfeatures that work and ones that are less successful.
    If you don’t already have a blog, and you want to follow along, please
    go to wordpress.com and create a userid, and bring a computer with
    you.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    16
    2:00pm - 3:30pm

    Dance, Access, and Arts Literacy: Lecture Demonstration

    Granoff Center for the Creative Arts
    This interactive performance and discussion session showcases American Dance Legacy Initiative’s work with diverse populations, featuring live and video presentations of professional dancers, persons with Parkinson’s Disease, college dancers, students from Central Falls High School, middle school students, and children with Autism. ADLI’s programs and Repertory Etudes (TM) are designed to engage participants with multiple points of entry and emphasize hands-on experiences that celebrate American dance as a cultural asset accessible to all.
    In this lecture demonstration, members of a Dance for Parkinson’s Disease class will perform an adapted version of a RepEtude based on the works of American dance legend and pioneer, José Limón (1908-1972). Erika Pujic, co-founder of Battleworks Dance Company, will share her work on a RepEtude, based on the choreography of Robert Battle who is currently artistic director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. Closer to home, students from Central Falls High School will present choreography inspired by RepEtudes based on the works of Battle, Limón, and David Parsons, and discuss their work as curators and interpreters of dance with public humanities students from the
    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    20
    12:00pm - 5:00pm

    Digital media and its use in museums

    Rockefeller Library
    How are museums using digital media? How should they? Join Seb Chan for a discussion of the ways that digital media are changing museums. An international leader in the field of digital media, Chan will describe his work at Australia’s Powerhouse Museum and now at the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, where digital media are generating new forms of public access and interactions with collections while the Museum is closed for renovations. Through a focus on digital media, Chan will guide participants through a consideration of public expectations of museums and the relationships between their physical spaces, their collections, and mediated experiences of visitors.
    This workshop is part of the Public Humanities Professional Development Series.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    9
    10:00am - 3:00pm

    Including Asian Americans in Public History

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Join Franklin Odo, founding Director of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American [APA] Program and former Interim Chief of the Asian Division in the Library of Congress, for an exploration of topics related to Asian Americans and public history. What are exemplary and inclusive ways to present Asian American history in museums and at historic sites? How should projects connect historical institutions to communities, including political, labor, and organizational leaders? This workshop will consider the relationship between public history and scholarship in Asian American studies and will examine major exhibits and other public history projects. Workshop participants will be invited to discuss their own projects and to collectively develop public history initiatives focused on topics in Asian American history and culture.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    25
    5:00pm - 8:00pm

    Now’s the time!: Expanding arts opportunities for children in the Creative Capital

    >> OFF CAMPUS LOCATION: see description for details
    City of Providence Mayor Angel Taveras, the Department of Art, Culture + Tourism, and Brown’s Center for Public Humanities will present the 2013 Senator Pell Lecture on Arts & Humanities on Thursday, April 25th at 6pm at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium. Now Is The Time!: Expanding Access to Arts Education in the Creative Capital, will welcome guests from Hartford, Boston, and the Bronx who will offer insights into how Providence might expand access to arts opportunities for children.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Oct
    15
    6:00pm - 7:30pm

    Peter Richards: Urbanature - Looking for Edges

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Peter Richards is a senior artist emeritus at the Exploratorium. He worked with its’ founder Frank Oppenheimer to set up the art programs and served as arts program director through 1998. He is best known for creating Wave Organ, a wave-activated sound sculpture located on the San Francisco waterfront. Peter has permanent outdoor installations at Artpark in Lewiston, New York, and in several sites in California, Arizona and Washington. He recently completed a major work at McLaren Park, San Francisco in collaboration with Susan Schwartzenberg titled “Philosopher’s Way. He has taught at the Center for Experimental and Interdisciplinary Arts at San Francisco State University, Ecole d’Art Aix en Provence, at the San Francisco Art Institute, and Stanford University. He is a cofounder of McColl Center for Visual Art in Charlotte, North Carolina, and was a research fellow at the Studio for Creative Inquiry, Carnegie Mellon University and is a fellow at the Mediterranean Center for Advanced Research in Marseille. He is past chair of the Alliance of Artist Communities Board of Trustees. Currently, he’s collaborating with Sue Richards on several public art commissions. Peter received a BA in sculpture from Colorado College and an MFA in sculpture from the Rinehart School of Sculpture, MICA.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Oct
    28
    7:00pm - 8:00pm

    An Account of Travels and Extraordinary Endeavors

    RI Hall, Room 108
    Mark Dion, an American fine artist best known for his use of scientific presentations in his installations, will present “An account of Travels and Extraordinary Endeavors”, or a history of museums. Dion has exhibited his art works internationally, including, at the Tate Gallery and the Museum of Modern Art and on the PBS series, art:21.[1] He teaches at the visual arts department of Columbia University in Manhattan. He has received numerous awards, including the ninth annual Larry Aldrich Foundation Award (2001). Dion will be in residence at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage in the spring of 2013.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Oct
    28
    7:30pm - 9:00pm

    Mark Dion: “An Account of Travels and Extraordinary Endeavors”

    Rhode Island Hall, Room 108
    Mark Dion’s art makes us think about how museums and universities shape our understandings of history and the natural world. His re-collections and re-creations question the lines between objective reality and subjective experience, using the forms of scientific and cultural institutions to reconsider those institutions. They subvert easy understanding of the past and the world around us, forcing us to look at the old in new ways.
    Dion will be in residence at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage in the spring of 2014 working on the Jenks Museum Project, a commemoration/re-creation/contemplation of Brown’s lost 19th-century museum of natural history and ethnography.
    Mark Dion has received numerous awards, including the ninth annual Larry Aldrich Foundation Award (2001) and the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Lucelia Art Award (2008). He has had major exhibitions at the Miami Art Museum (2006); Museum of Modern Art, New York (2004); Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut (2003); and Tate Gallery, London (1999).
    JNBC Lectures
  • Nov
    6
    Join the Center for Public Humanities for a screening and discussion with Director/Producers of THE OTHER HALF OF TOMORROW.
    The OTHER HALF OF TOMORROW is a portrait of contemporary Pakistan as seen through the perspectives of Pakistani women working to change their country. A series of seven linked chapters, the film introduces us to the disparate contexts that make up a complex culture—from a women’s rights’ workshop in a village in rural Punjab, to an underground dance academy in Karachi, to the playing fields of the Pakistan Women’s Cricket Team.
    Intertwining the religious economic, social, and political issues that are fracturing Pakistani society, THE OTHER HALF OF TOMORROW explores the richness and internal plurality within Pakistan and the urgent need for better understanding of its conflicts. A family collaboration, the film is produced, directed and photographed by the mother-daughter-son-in-law team of Pakistani-American visual artist and author Samina Quraeshi, filmmaker and author Sadia Shepard and cinematographer Andreas Burgess. Samina and Sadia will be in attendance to lead discussion and answer questions following the screening.
    This event is co-sponsored by the Third World Center and the Asian/Asian-American Heritage Series, the Sarah Doyle Womens Center, and the South Asian Students Association and Pakistani Students Association at Brown University.
    JNBC Lectures
  • A new environment for scholarly research is emerging out of the steady accumulation of digitized sources over the last two decades, contemporary models for accessing those sources, and novel
    methods for searching, sorting, and mining them in ways that forge new connections and enhance serendipity. With a look at the Digital Public Library of America’s approach to research and discovery, Executive Director, Dan Cohen will survey today’s and tomorrow’s electronic landscape.
    Dan Cohen is the Founding Executive Director of the DPLA, where he works to further the DPLA’s mission to make the cultural and scientific heritage of humanity available, free of charge, to all. Prior to his tenure, Dan was the Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. At the Center, Dan oversaw projects ranging from new publishing ventures (PressForward) to online collections (September 11 Digital Archive) to software for scholarship (the popular Zotero research tool). His books include Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web (with Roy Rosenzweig) and Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith. Dan was an inaugural recipient of the American Council of Learned Societies’ Digital Innovation Fellowship. In 2011 he received the Frederick G. Kilgour Award from the American Library Association for his work in digital humanities, and in 2012 he was named one of the top “tech innovators” in academia by the Chronicle of Higher Education.
    As the opening event for the MA in Public Humanities Program Open House, this lecture will be followed by a brief presentation of the MA program in Public Humanities and a reception.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Nov
    15
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    Artist-driven Programming in Art and Culture Museums

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Museum programming has become increasingly more open, participatory, and collaborative—with artists, the public, and online communities. This is both a pedagogical strategy as well as a trend that aligns with how many contemporary artists are working. This workshop will explore one specific aspect of this model: the unique collaborations with artists. How do museum educators create effective programs that meet the goals of their institution while also forging a genuine collaboration with artists? How can programmers build an audience for these kinds of events? What are strategies for aligning these programs with the institution’s overarching mission? This workshop will present several case studies from the Whitney Museum of American Art as a means of examining effective artist-driven programs, and in turn, will allow workshop participants to begin developing such programs for their own institution.
    Margie Weinstein worked in the Education Department of the Whitney Museum for ten years, most recently as the Manager of Education Initiatives, from 2008 to 2013, where she oversaw all adult public programs for the institution. During her time at the Whitney she worked with a diverse range of artists and organized over one hundred artist-driven programs. She has also taught university-level courses and has a doctorate in cultural studies and comparative literature.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Feb
    20
    2:30pm - 4:30pm

    Presenting the History of Slavery: Three Approaches

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Join the leaders of three historical organizations for a discussion of the representation of slavery in recent exhibits and public programs and the impact of those initiatives on visitors, staff, and mission.
    Panelists include Morgan Grefe (Executive Director, Rhode Island Historical Society), Kristin Gallas (Director of Interpretation Projects, Tracing Center) and Louise Mirrer (President and CEO of the New York Historical Society). Discussion will be moderated by Steven Lubar, Professor of American Studies and History, Director, John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
    JNBC Lectures
  • The Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage and the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice (CSSJ) welcome Azie Mira Dungey to discuss her controversial new satirical web series Ask A Slave, and her former work as a historical interpreter of enslaved life at George Washington’s Mount Vernon. Dungey, a writer and comedienne is a graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Performing Arts.
    Following a presentation of her work, Hosts Ronald Potvin (Assistant Director & Curator of the Center for Public Humanities, and historic house expert) and Dr. Patricia Lott, (Ruth J. Simmons Post-Doctoral Fellow in Slavery and Justice), will engage Azie Dungey in a discussion on interpreting and representing the lives of enslaved persons at American historic house museums.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Many arts and heritage organizations now consider the digital counterpoint to their physical visits a key part of their operation, with web visits, social media followers and e-commerce transactions supporting funding bids, PR stories and more. It allows them to grow their reach worldwide, to share their stories and their history with those who would be unlikely to ever visit.
    So what’s the value of digital participation, and why are we investing more time and money in creating these projects in the cultural sector? What can be learned from what has come before and how can we ensure that there is value and learning from our own online activities? This session will explore audience development, examine online demographics and share digital participation case studies from cultural organizations in the UK and unpick the key learnings from these projects.
    Emma McLean has worked across the cultural sector for over 10 years, from theatre, dance and music to art galleries, museums and heritage. With a background in audience development, Emma has specialized in digital marketing and engagement and now works with major museum, gallery and theatre clients across the UK as Digital Manager at AKA Promotions in the London office (http://www.akauk.com/).
    Emma can be found on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/emmamclean
    JNBC Lectures
  • Sep
    25
    7:00pm - 9:00pm

    Panel Discussion - Who is a Refugee? What makes a Refuge? RI Stories of Immigrants and Refugees

    >> OFF CAMPUS LOCATION: see description for details
    Join us for a public forum and discussion on the stories, struggles, and successes of immigrant and refugee populations in Rhode Island.
    The panel concludes a month of programming organized the Guantánamo Public Memory Project, which explores the history of the United States’ use of GTMO to house immigrants and refugees, as well as its post-9/11 use as a prison for suspected terrorists.
    This moderated discussion will link the history of the U.S. naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, to contemporary experiences of immigrants and refugees here in Rhode Island, drawing out some of the Project’s themes: What is a refuge? What legal barriers do immigrants and refugees face? How does one make a home in an unfamiliar place? How do these populations respond to and shape their own experiences?
    Featuring Marta Martinez (Project Director, Latino Oral History Project of RI), Patrick Sylvain (Professor of Haitian Creole, Brown University), Silaphone Nhongvongsouthy (Family Service Care Coordinator, Center for Southeast Asians), and others.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Oct
    16
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Public Humanities Fellows Lucheon with Dietrich Neumann

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Dietrich Neumann, Professor, Departments of History of Art and Architecture, Urban Studies and Italian Studies; Director of Urban Studies will deliver the first Public Humanities Fellows Luncheon Lecture. Working with his students, Professor Neumann developed an Iphone App, called “Brown Facades” which provides a mobile tour of Brown architecture. Currently, a new group of students is working on a major upgrade of the App with much additional contents and new features. Princeton Architectural Press, who recently produced the Brown University Campus Guide and so far 25 others, was so impressed by the App, that it has made it the model for a new series of Apps that will be developed under Dietrich’s guidance, and with the help of his students, for all 25 existing architecture guides. All are welcome, but RSVP is requested for catering purposes
    JNBC Lectures
  • What does it mean to be a storyteller in 2014? How do stories remain relevant in an ever-evolving and expanding world? Join us for a conversation on visual storytelling with Keith Jenkins, a leader at National Geographic overseeing its transformation into a digital organization.
    In the short time he has been at National Geographic, Jenkins and his team launched Proof, NGS’s photo blog, and helped grow Your Shot, NGS’s online photo site, into a thriving community.
    Jenkins is a distinguished speaker on photography and multimedia; he is currently an adjunct professor at Georgetown University and worked previously as Senior Producer for Multimedia at NPR.org and a Managing Editor for Photography at The Washington Post.
    Co-sponsored by the Swearer Center for Public Service, John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities, Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, and Departments of Anthropology and Theatre Arts and Performance Studies.
    Learn more about the Swearer Center’s Storytelling Speaker Series at brown.edu/go/storytellers.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Christina founded and runs the weekly Salon Series at the Providence Athenaeum which for nearly nine years has featured guest lectures, community discussions, libations, and a revival of the salon culture that once played a pivotal role in the intellectual and cultural development of social groups, societies, and even countries. Currently in the process of developing a new five-year Strategic Plan, the Athenaeum has instituted a “salon sabbatical” for this fall so Christina can look for ways that future programming can best support the Athenaeum’s overall goals. The fellowship gives her a chance to assess the past nine years and develop sustainable models for creating collaborative partnerships, measuring the cumulative impact of the Salons, and creating a searchable on-line archive, via a blog, of Salon development . Christina will elaborate on her plans for the year during her luncheon. RSVP is requested for catering purposes.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Dec
    11
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Fellow’s Talk: Holly Ewald of UPP Arts!

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Third Fellow’s Lunch Talk! Holly Ewald, Founder and Artistic Director of UPP Arts, formerly known as the Urban Pond Procession, will discuss the evolution of the organization’s work, which has integrated artistic practice, environmental justice, and community memory. Founded in 2007, the Urban Pond Procession originated from a mandate to make signs warning local people about the dangers of fishing and swimming in Mashapaug Pond, stemming from the site’s history of use by the Gorham Silver Manufactory. The project has grown to incorporate community initiatives, educational outreach in area schools, arts and community organizations, and collaborative actions with municipal and state institutions. UPP Arts engages local artists to do community-oriented work, and provides workshops and tools to teach about local industrial history and its ongoing effects on local environmental well-being. Holly will also discuss the present work of expanding UPP Arts to consider more urban pond sites in Warwick and Cranston.
    The talk will be held at noon on Thursday, December 11th, in the Lecture Room at the Nightingale-Brown House. Lunch will be served. Please give us a quick RSVP at http://goo.gl/forms/qo7n0c4OsS if you’ll be there!
    JNBC Lectures
  • Feb
    26
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    “The Moth Goes to College” (Kristy Bennett)

    Nightingale-Brown House
    The Moth is a leader in the unique and distinctive art of storytelling. Moth Producer Kirsty Bennett talks about the history of The Moth, her work producing the live tour and the importance of bringing storytelling workshops to higher education institutions.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    10
    6:00pm - 7:00pm

    Berlin: Art and Memories

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Stih & Schnock is a Berlin-based artist duo, formed by Renata Stih, Professor at the Berlin University of Applied Sciences and curator at the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale, and Frieder Schnock, PhD in Art History. Their works deal primarily with collective memory in society. The Holocaust is also a recurring reference for their artistic interventions. Their controversial, often irreverent works engage a range of media in the urban context. They have been exhibited in Berlin, at the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, the Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale, the Jewish Museum of New York and at Washington University, St. Louis.
    JNBC Lectures
  • Mar
    12
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Sheila Brennan: “Digital Humanities Centered in Museums”

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Can digital humanities centers be located in museums? Digital humanities work often is centered or spearheaded inside academic institutions. Brennan will explore digital humanities work already been done within museums and explore what museum-driven digital humanities work might look like in the future.
    Sheila Brennan is the Associate Director of Public Projects at Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media and Research Associate Professor of History and Art History at George Mason University
    Kindly RSVP
    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    2
    Buildings and physical spaces provide an ideal means of investigating the past and intervening in the present. In light of the ongoing housing crisis, global struggles over land and the availability of new technologies, Kate Diedrick (Public Humanities MA Student) and Jo Guldi (Hans Rothfels Assistant Professor of History and Public Humanities Faculty Fellow) have been re-thinking and re-mixing the radical walking tour. In December 2014 they launched a hybrid (online and in-person) walking tour of foreclosures in Providence in Guldi’s undergraduate course on Land Use and Capitalism. Inspired by lessons from Guldi’s research on the history of participatory mapping and other tools used by 19th century reformers, Diedrick is developing a framework and a toolkit for scholars, activists and allies to re-imagine the walking tour. In this talk, Diedrick and Guldi will discuss the possibilities and limitations for the future of the radical walking tour, based on their work over the past eight months.
    K & C lunch will be provided. Kindly RSVP (http://goo.gl/forms/98j6hVfQbx) by Monday, March 30
    JNBC Lectures
  • Apr
    14
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    A Student Tour of Hong Kong

    Nightingale-Brown House
    Professor Ian Morley, Chinese University of Hong Kong, designed a field trip application for the students in his urban history course. Based upon a walking tour of the Central District in Hong Kong the app granted students a new means to see and so comprehend a city district currently defined by skyscrapers, yet an urban quarter within which intricate layers of the 19th century built past still remain.
    Lunch will be provided. Kindly RSVP by Friday, April 10 - http://goo.gl/forms/8jjH0UCt5A
    JNBC Lectures
  • From 1910 to 1920, vigilantes and Texas Rangers killed hundreds of innocent Mexicans in one of the least remembered, and yet largest episodes of racial violence and civil unrest in American history. The centennial of this peak of violence is upon us.
    Monica Muñoz Martinez, Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies, and Amelia Grabowski, Public Humanities MA Student, discuss their effort to map the history of racial violence, to coordinate public history exhibits, and unveil historical markers in Texas. Martinez and Grabowski used digital tools as well as other strategies to collaborate with and challenge state institutions in facing this period of violence. Here they will outline the possibilities and limitations for future digital mapping projects that aim to create a visual representation of violence, grief, and loss.

    Lunch will be provided. Kindly RSVP by Monday, 4/20/15 - http://goo.gl/forms/V3puvMb7xX
    JNBC Lectures

Upcoming Lectures

  • Art in the public realm has the potential to significantly impact the social and civic life of the communities in which it is based. How can public art center the voices of these communities as well as the vision of its makers? At the Office of Public Art in Pittsburgh, we believe that art can build community and increase social connection. We envision a region in which the creative practices of artists are fully engaged to collaboratively shape the public realm and catalyze community-led change. Our Civically Engaged Public Art program is grounded in equity and social justice and centers collaborations with communities that have been historically marginalized and underrepresented in civic processes. The artists with whom we work, who engage in civic practice, go far beyond studio and social practice to co-create with communities. Their work stretches across media and disciplines but shares a common focus on putting people and place first. They trouble the distinction between history and memory, amplifying marginalized stories and entering them into the public record through their work. In this roundtable, you will learn about OPA’s recent civically engaged public art projects, as well as the collaborations between the artists and communities integral to their creation.

    Divya Rao Heffley (PhD’10) is an arts professional with over fifteen years of experience in museums, public art, and art and architectural history. As Associate Director for the Office of Public Art, Divya works with artists and communities on residencies and commissions that address a range of contemporary issues, seeking to foster social justice and cultural equity in public spaces. Prior to joining OPA, Divya managed the Hillman Photography Initiative at Carnegie Museum of Art from 2013-18. She has served as guest critic for the Carnegie Mellon University School of Art as well as on national juries and panels for artist selections, grants, and portfolio reviews. Divya holds a PhD in the History of Art and Architecture from Brown University and a BA in the History of Art from Yale University. As an Indian-American immigrant and member of a multicultural family, Divya is a committed advocate of equity in arts and culture and beyond. She grew up in Pittsburgh and has three energetic children as well as a dedicated practice in martial arts.

    JNBC Lectures
  • Nina Zannieri is the Executive Director, Paul Revere Association.

    History museum and historic sites, already complex organizations that are dynamic public history venues, tourist attractions, versatile businesses, and trusted community resources, are facing numerous challenges as they navigate a health crisis and a national reckoning on matters of race, equity, climate and more. Learn how the Paul Revere House on Boston’s Freedom Trail is managing these issues in a conversation with its long-time Executive Director and Brown graduate, Nina Zannieri.

    JNBC Lectures
  • The rhetoric of sustainable design often takes the position of mitigating the impact of construction, at best, limiting the embodied energy and the carbon footprint of buildings. Can we go further than this, to look at a whole-systems co-design of ecologies and buildings, to discover how buildings may be used to improve local ecologies?

    Lara Davis is an architect and masonry specialist who has served as co-director of the Auroville Earth Institute and representative for the UNESCO Chair of Earthen Construction. Her core commitment is to the sustainable co-evolution of natural ecologies and human habitats, with passive design methods, low-carbon materials and circular ecologies of natural resources.

    JNBC Lectures
  • After many years working within museology, we continue to see items in collections disguised with mistaken and unsuitable interpretations. The inclusion of expert peoples representing the source of collection materials is the keystone of a museum collaboration movement. We are aware that knowledges are transitory and fluid, and the old systems supporting only one way of knowing are artifacts of humanity’s misstep. I see collaboration as co-laboring and co-elaborating from a fixed center, and we can apply the collaborative practice in a variety of critical social situations.” From the Museum Collaboration Manifesto ~ Jim Enote

    Jim Enote is a Zuni tribal member, CEO of the Colorado Plateau Foundation, former director of the A:shiwi A:wan Museum, and the Ames Prize’s first recipient for innovative museum anthropology. Enote serves on the boards of the Trust for Mutual Understanding and the Grand Canyon Trust. Jim’s service the past forty years includes assignments for organizations including UNESCO, UNDP, International Secretariat for Water, Nordic Council of Ministers, Tibet Child Nutrition Project, the Mountain Institute, National Geographic Society, US Bureau of Indian Affairs, US National Park Service, and the Zuni Tribe. In 2013 he received the Guardian of Culture and Lifeways Award from the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums, and in 2016 received the Hewett Award for leadership and service to the New Mexico museum community and achievements in the museum field.

    JNBC Lectures