Events: Lectures

Lectures

“More than Just Volunteers: the International Docents that Connect the Museum to the World.” Virtual lunch talk by Phaedra Hui-shih Fang (National Museum of Taiwan)

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

The National Taiwan Museum in Taipei, established in 1908, is the oldest museum in Taiwan, with collections and programming related to the history of Taiwan, as well as anthropology, the earth sciences, zoology and botany. The Museum has developed an innovative program that trains international undergraduate and graduate students to give guided walking tours of the Museum’s collections and its historic buildings. Fang’s presentation gives an overview of this program, the National Taiwan Museum, and the state of the field of museum education in Taiwan today.

Lectures

“The Museum We Closed is Not the Museum We Reopen” Virtual lunch talk by Scott Stulen (Director and President, Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, OK).

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Museums are currently facing challenges on multiple fronts, from an ongoing global pandemic, calls to address systematic racism, long-standing labor inequity and looming financial shortfalls. For leadership, it can be a time to hold on to the past or an opportunity for radical change. Scott Stulen will share how the Philbrook Museum of Art is responding to this moment by connecting to the needs of the community, building a more sustainable organization and redefining how we measure success.

Lectures

“Witness” Virtual lunch talk by Karyn Olivier

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Karyn Olivier creates sculptures, installations, and public art. Her work often intersects and collapses multiple histories and memories with present-day narratives. She will discuss several projects which engage existing monuments and her fabrication of contemporary monuments and memorials.

Lectures

Southern New England Native Baskets and the Narrative of “Disappearance.” Virtual Lunch talk by Denene De Quintal

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Lectures

Virtual lunch talk by Dan Yaeger (NEMA): “COVID and Chaos: How Museums are Navigating the Crisis”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

With 3,000 members throughout the region, the New England Museum Association has been a hub for keeping museums and museum people connected during the coronavirus crisis. Here’s your chance to speak with NEMA Executive Director Dan Yaeger about the latest from the front lines of museum leadership, how people are coping, and the short/long-term prospects for museum careers.

Lectures

Virtual Lunch Talk: “Adaptive Practices: Two Curators Redefine Gathering During a Pandemic.”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

Having been closed for 18 months of renovation, Providence Public Library was scheduled to begin its grand reopening on March 30th, with events and activities designed to bring crowds into the Library’s beautiful new public spaces throughout the weeks and months ahead. Instead, the Library didn’t open, and all public gathering for the foreseeable future has ceased.

Lectures

Virtual Lunch Talk by Amelia Grabowski, MA’15: “Crafting the Mini-Exhibit in Your NewsFeed: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Museum Social Media Management”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage

How many times a year do you visit a museum (when there’s not a pandemic)? How many times a day do you check your phone? Museums’ social media accounts offer great ways to reach the audiences where they are and create unique experiences that you can’t offer IRL. But, it’s harder than it looks.

Lectures

CANCELED: Lunch Talk: “Art, Public Space and Closing Societies”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Yukiko Yamagata, Curatorial and Deputy Director, Open Society Foundations (New York, NY).

Talk description coming soon.

Lectures

Lunch Talk: “Estates of Sanctuary: The Struggle Against Information Asymmetry”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Libertad O. Guerra, Executive Director, Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural and Educational Center (New York, NY).

Lectures

Lunch Talk: “Institution-Building with Art and Artists at the Core”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Join Nico Wheadon—writer, professor of art, and Executive Director of NXTHVN—as she discusses the role of art and artists in building and sustaining culturally-specific institutions.

Lectures

Lunch Talk: “Traces: Honoring a Neighborhood’s History and Soundscape”

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

“Traces” is a collaborative performance project commissioned by Community MusicWorks (CMW), tracing the sonic memory of a place: an empty lot in the West End of Providence that will be the future home of Community MusicWorks. The work will be created by composer Shaw Pong Liu in collaboration with public historian Micah Salkind, neighborhood resident and educator Joanne Ayuso, and the Rhode Island Historical Society, and will present histories and stories of the neighborhood.

Lectures

Lunch Talk: Fostering Community-Driven Archives: Meeting Practitioners At Their Point of Need

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Angela DiVeglia, Curatorial Assistant at Providence Public Library; Dr. Taino J. Palermo, RWU Community Development Graduate Program; and Kate Wells, Curator of RI Collections at Providence Public Library.

Lectures

Lunch Talk: Kīpuka Aloha ʻĀina: Spaces of Indigenous Hawaiian Resurgence

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Mary Tuti Baker is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science at Brown University, where she teaches courses in Indigenous Political Theory.

Lectures

Refusing to See

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Artist and designer Rosten Woo discusses public projects in New York and Los Angeles that interpret spaces that are willfully unseen by those in power. Stories from Brooklyn’s Fulton Mall to Los Angeles’ Willowbrook and Little Tokyo will deal with themes of race, retail, urban development, public memory, and systems of value.

Lectures

In Plain Sight: Interpreting the Invisible, Unlovable, and Overlooked.

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

What are the stories a storm drain can tell? Can sanitation be loveable?Under the Umbrella, an immersive game, poetic installation, and community art project reframes the everyday landscape as a place of adventure, quest seeking, and quiet discovery. Therese Kelly will share how architectural storytelling can promote both social and environmental resilience.

Lectures

Exhibiting Rome: Rulers over Land and Seas

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Dr. Katia Schörle will come present her latest work as a curator of an exhibit on the Roman Army in Arles, at the Musée Départemental Arles Antique. In France, no one had dared to put together an exhibit on that topic since the First World War. This exhibition, which runs until the end of April and has currently been viewed by more than 25,000 visitors, brings together a rich collection of 250 artworks and artifacts from the Louvre, the MAN in Saint Germain en Laye, and prestigious international loans from France, the UK, Switzerland and Italy. Dr.

Lectures

Southlight in Context

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

How do we build the city? As investment in the public realm declines, what are the possible alternatives to commercial development and public-private partnerships? With these questions as backdrop, Aaron Forrest will present the design and construction of the Southlight project, a performance pavilion and garden built as a partnership between Rhode Island School of Design, the Southside Cultural Center of Rhode Island, and the City of Providence. Aaron will discuss the challenges and successes of the community-engaged design process that led to the project’s construction in 2016.

Lectures

Newest Americans: Stories from the Global City

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

By mid-century, demographers predict that people of European descent will no longer be the majority in the United States. Newest Americans is a multimedia documentary and storytelling project that explores the implications of this seismic change from the perspective of the campus of Rutgers University-Newark, the most diverse university in the country for the past two decades.

Lectures

Migrant Zero: Caribbean Immigrant Narratives

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

This presentation explores the notion of a “migrant zero” in a collective sense, by exploring the first group of West Indians to settle in the Greater Hartford region. How and why did West Indians move to Connecticut, and perhaps more importantly, why did they stay? This story connects to important and contentious national debates in American public discourse on immigration and globalization: chain migration, guest worker programs, illegal migration, and deportation.

Lectures

At the Push of a Button: Creative Expression in the Public Sphere of Myanmar

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Tea Shop is an autonomous, interactive space that has a simple motto (translated into English): “Free to use by all (in cost and content). No red tape, no exclusion, and no power bill (we use solar energy).” Outside the reach of state censure, this in-progress project uses social sculpture to implicitly engage issues of land-use planning, neocolonialism and listening that is specific to the concerns of those in Yangon using it to creatively express themselves.

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