Events: Lectures

Lectures

Refusing to See

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Artist and designer Rosten Woo discusses public projects in New York and Los Angeles that interpret spaces that are willfully unseen by those in power. Stories from Brooklyn’s Fulton Mall to Los Angeles’ Willowbrook and Little Tokyo will deal with themes of race, retail, urban development, public memory, and systems of value.

Lectures

In Plain Sight: Interpreting the Invisible, Unlovable, and Overlooked.

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

What are the stories a storm drain can tell? Can sanitation be loveable?Under the Umbrella, an immersive game, poetic installation, and community art project reframes the everyday landscape as a place of adventure, quest seeking, and quiet discovery. Therese Kelly will share how architectural storytelling can promote both social and environmental resilience.

Lectures

Exhibiting Rome: Rulers over Land and Seas

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Dr. Katia Schörle will come present her latest work as a curator of an exhibit on the Roman Army in Arles, at the Musée Départemental Arles Antique. In France, no one had dared to put together an exhibit on that topic since the First World War. This exhibition, which runs until the end of April and has currently been viewed by more than 25,000 visitors, brings together a rich collection of 250 artworks and artifacts from the Louvre, the MAN in Saint Germain en Laye, and prestigious international loans from France, the UK, Switzerland and Italy. Dr.

Lectures

Southlight in Context

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

How do we build the city? As investment in the public realm declines, what are the possible alternatives to commercial development and public-private partnerships? With these questions as backdrop, Aaron Forrest will present the design and construction of the Southlight project, a performance pavilion and garden built as a partnership between Rhode Island School of Design, the Southside Cultural Center of Rhode Island, and the City of Providence. Aaron will discuss the challenges and successes of the community-engaged design process that led to the project’s construction in 2016.

Lectures

Newest Americans: Stories from the Global City

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

By mid-century, demographers predict that people of European descent will no longer be the majority in the United States. Newest Americans is a multimedia documentary and storytelling project that explores the implications of this seismic change from the perspective of the campus of Rutgers University-Newark, the most diverse university in the country for the past two decades.

Lectures

Migrant Zero: Caribbean Immigrant Narratives

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

This presentation explores the notion of a “migrant zero” in a collective sense, by exploring the first group of West Indians to settle in the Greater Hartford region. How and why did West Indians move to Connecticut, and perhaps more importantly, why did they stay? This story connects to important and contentious national debates in American public discourse on immigration and globalization: chain migration, guest worker programs, illegal migration, and deportation.

Lectures

At the Push of a Button: Creative Expression in the Public Sphere of Myanmar

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities & Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Tea Shop is an autonomous, interactive space that has a simple motto (translated into English): “Free to use by all (in cost and content). No red tape, no exclusion, and no power bill (we use solar energy).” Outside the reach of state censure, this in-progress project uses social sculpture to implicitly engage issues of land-use planning, neocolonialism and listening that is specific to the concerns of those in Yangon using it to creatively express themselves.

Lectures

A Useable Past: Making an Old House Relevant at the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room
Lectures

Art in the City: The Practices of Procedural Public Art

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Did you know there are over 400 contemporary artworks in the city of New York’s public art collection? Where and how are these pieces situated? What is the process for artist selection, and artwork development, approval, and installation? Reina Shibata will discuss NYC’s public art processes, and what it takes to realize projects in the public realm.

Reina Shibata, MA’10, Deputy Director, Percent for Art, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs.

Lectures

Black Labor at the Nightingale-Brown House

John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage
, Lecture Room

Joanne Pope Melish will explore the role of enslaved and free people of color in the rise of Joseph Nightingale, the Providence merchant whose elegant Benefit Street mansion is now the home of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage.

Lectures

Radical Inclusion and Creativity: Working for Museum Innovation

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room
Like many creatives, Sage’s career has not followed a well-established, linear trajectory. Rather, she has had to make her way along the sometimes thorny path of her own design. Her last three jobs were created for and by her, and sparked innovations, spurred new partnerships and resulted in the inclusion of young people who are too often excluded from universities and museums. Sage’s presentation is a poetic interpretation of her public cultural humanity work through the creative lens of equity.
Lectures

Global Mass Incarceration: A Human Rights Crisis

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room

Mass incarceration is not only a problem in the United States. The globalization of mass incarceration presents unique challenges and opportunities for those working to combat the discriminatory practice of locking up certain populations in mass. This talk explores incarceration, genocide, and the U.S. racial history of incarceration during the United Nations International Decade for People of African Descent.

Lectures

How to Make the Revolution Irresistible: Everyday Stories at the National Public Housing Museum

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room
Lectures

Visualizing Precarious Lives in “Torn Apart / Separados”

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room

How can digital humanities be used to respond rapidly to humanitarian crises? What are the considerations for undertaking this work with vulnerable communities? This talk examines these questions throughTorn Apart / Separados, a digital humanities project that used data storytelling to respond to the United States’ government’s “zero tolerance” and family separation immigration policies. 

Roopika Risam, Assistant Professor of English at Salem State University.

Lectures

Young Visitors to Shanghai’s New Art Museum

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room

Lectures

How To Make Art with People, Places, and Things: Guggenheim Social Practice

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room

What do a Moluccan cockatoo, police officer, and Punjabi TV station have in common when thinking about contemporary art? Framing the social as an artistic medium, Christina Yang provides an overview of how the Guggenheim educators and curators, artists, and activists alike are working together to create new realities within the political imaginary.

Lectures

What We Learned: Curating Bears Ears and Drone Warriors

Center for Public Humanities
, Lecture Room, 1st floor

Lectures

The Public Square Talks Series: Eric Williams

Nightingale-Brown House

What does it look like when a entrepreneurial enterprise is also a community hub? What happens when independent artists and artisans are prioritized over fast fashion? Eric Williams is the Owner and Creative Director of The Silver Room, a retail, events and community space on Chicago's South side. Eric has made his business by developing an involved, socially conscious, fashion forward community.

Lectures

The No-No Boy Project and The JA Incarceration Mobile Workshop

Nightingale-Brown House

The No-No Boy and JA Incarceration Mobile Workshop lunchtime event brings together two projects that grapple with the intersection of public memory and Asian American Studies.

Lectures

Participatory Mapping and Youth Activism

Nightingale-Brown House

This talk spotlights Youth in Action's dedication to participatory learning through mapping and relocalization projects that invite youth to use maps to better understand themselves and their communities.  A map holds a unique narrative that has no predetermined beginning, and it’s this nature that lends itself to the honest, participatory experience of locating oneself.

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