Lectures

Lectures

Artist Talk with Meredith Stern: "Hear Us Roar!: Surviving Contemporary Patriarchy through Subversive Creation"

Arnold Lounge, 17 Benevolent Street

Meredith Stern will discuss her portfolio project:  "This is an Emergency!: A Reproductive Rights and Gender Justice Portfolio", exhibit on display at the Sarah Doyle Womens Center lounge from September 19-October 22. The portfolio is a newly released collection of art and writing on the subject of reproductive rights and gender justice.

Lectures

Art, Community and Institutions in Flux: A Museological Approach to Creative Placemaking

Nightingale-Brown House

Join Nico Wheadon—Director of Public Programs & Community Engagement at The Studio Museum in Harlem—as she discusses her Museum’s approach to creative placemaking.

Lectures

Archive Fever: Visual Advocacy in Boston’s Chinese Community

Nightingale-Brown House

This past autumn residents and visitors to Boston’s Chinatown neighbor encountered two exhibitions in its public spaces that deployed archival imagery, drawn from the collection of the Chinese Historical Society of New England, to confront current local issues.

Lectures

Along the Border and on the Digital Frontier: Mapping and Memorializing Violence

Nightingale-Brown House

From 1910 to 1920, vigilantes and Texas Rangers killed hundreds of innocent Mexicans in one of the least remembered, and yet largest episodes of racial violence and civil unrest in American history. The centennial of this peak of violence is upon us.

Lectures

Abandoning Museum Neutrality

Nightingale-Brown House

The Tenement Museum was founded in 1988 with a clear social justice mission – to help modern Americans empathize with the ongoing immigrant experience. But being an activist museum is hardly straightforward. Is it possible to take a non-partisan political stand and still please a diverse audience of visitors, donors, and board members? What does this look like in education programs? Behind the scenes? Let's discuss.

Lectures

A Proposal on the Table: Wolfsonian Public Humanities Lab

Nightingale-Brown House

The Wolfsonian–FIU Museum on Miami Beach, which holds the largest permanent collection of material tracing the development of the modern age, has proposed the creation of a new space and academic enterprise to be called the Wolfsonian Public Humanities Lab. This new endeavor will bring together professors from across the humanities, humanities students, and the community into conversation with the extensive collection held by the museum.

Lectures

A Cemetery’s Lament: Desecration and Responsibility along Vienna’s Gürtel

Nightingale-Brown House

Lunch Talk by Diane O’Donoghue, Senior Fellow for the Humanities (Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizeship and Public Service at Tufts University)

Lectures

6th Annual Senator Claiborne Pell Lecture On Arts + Humanities with Arlene Goldbard

RISD Museum, Michael P. Metcalf Auditorium

Arlene Goldbard, activist and author of books including The Culture of Possibility: Art, Artists & The Future and The Wave, imagines the possibilities for Providence in 20 years if its citizens understand how art and culture are essential to a sustainable future, and if they have the foresight to weave art's transformative power into every aspect of public and private life.

Lectures

5th Annual Senator Claiborne Pell Lecture on Arts and Humanities

>> OFF CAMPUS LOCATION: see description for details

Location: Veterans Memorial Auditorium: 1 Avenue of the Arts Providence, RI 02903

Reception: 5-6pm, Presentation: 6-7:30pm

Join the conversation about how Providence can leverage our deep bench of arts organizations, cultural plan, arts educators in and out of the schools and after school infrastructure to provide more opportunities for arts learning for our public school children?

Lectures

#NoDAPL and Settler Indigenization

Nightingale-Brown House

Tying together four "moments" in the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline, this presentation will look at the ways settlers incorporated or distanced themselves from the movement at Standing Rock, and the ways the media narratives reinforced problematic stereotypes of Native peoples through their reporting. In a fight that should be centered on Indigenous peoples and their rights, what are the ways non-Natives usurped and shifted the narrative?

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