Lectures

Lectures

Views of North America: Black Freedom in the White House

Nightingale-Brown House

This talk examines the history surrounding Vues d’Amerique du Nord, a nineteenth century scenic wallpaper, in order to trace the routes through which the US state, in the form of the presidency, appropriated images and ideas about black freedom. It connects state efforts to suppress autonomous black freedom struggles to the various contexts for producing and reproducing for this significant element of material culture.

Lectures

Tomaquag Museum, a Vehicle for Indigenous Empowerment

Nightingale-Brown House

The Indigenous Empowerment Network was developed by Lorén Spears, Executive Director of Tomaquag Museum, to promote Indigenous initiatives around education, job training, cultural arts, and entrepreneurship. She will share how the museum’s exhibits, programs and tours promote empowerment by sharing Indigenous perspectives, untold histories and contemporary issues across “Indian Country.”

 An evening of short films focused on the topic of Hong Kong’s 2014 Umbrella Movement. The program will highlight several short films produced by the spectrum of accomplished and amateur documentarians, and provide a window into the Umbrella Movement’s unparalleled demonstrations. A facilitated discussion of the films led by visiting international scholar Oscar Ho - Professor of Cultural Management at the Chinese University of Hong Kong - will follow.

Lectures

The Work of Art in the World: Civic Agency and Public Humanities

Nightingale-Brown House
Celebrating art and interpretation that take on social challenges, Doris Sommer steers the humanities back to engagement with the world.  Among the cases that she covers are top-down initiatives of political leaders, such as those launched by Antanas Mockus, former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia, and also bottom-up movements like the Theatre of the Oppressed created by the

Lectures

The Witness Tree Project

Nightingale-Brown House

Join us for a presentation of The Witness Tree Project, facilitated by Daniel Cavicchi and Dale Boholm. Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in conjunction with the National Park Service (NPS) has developed a new collaborative model for teaching and learning, called the "Witness Tree Project".

Lectures

The Public Square Talks Series: Eric Williams

Nightingale-Brown House

What does it look like when a entrepreneurial enterprise is also a community hub? What happens when independent artists and artisans are prioritized over fast fashion? Eric Williams is the Owner and Creative Director of The Silver Room, a retail, events and community space on Chicago's South side. Eric has made his business by developing an involved, socially conscious, fashion forward community.

Lectures

The Power of Visual Storytelling in the Networked World: A Conversation with National Geographic's Keith Jenkins

Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Martinos Auditorium

What does it mean to be a storyteller in 2014? How do stories remain relevant in an ever-evolving and expanding world? Join us for a conversation on visual storytelling with Keith Jenkins, a leader at National Geographic overseeing its transformation into a digital organization. In the short time he has been at National Geographic, Jenkins and his team launched Proof, NGS’s photo blog, and helped grow Your Shot, NGS’s online photo site, into a thriving community.

Lectures

The No-No Boy Project and The JA Incarceration Mobile Workshop

Nightingale-Brown House

The No-No Boy and JA Incarceration Mobile Workshop lunchtime event brings together two projects that grapple with the intersection of public memory and Asian American Studies.

Lectures

The Future of Museums and the Public Humanities: Perspectives from Italy, A roundtable discussion

Nightingale Brown House, 357 Benefit Street, Providence RI

a Roundtable Discussion with Paolo Rosa, founder of Studio Azzurro, Fitt Artist in Residence, Brown Creative Arts Council, Luigi Di Corato, director, Siena Museums Foundation, and John Smith, Director of the RISD Museum

Free and Open to the Public

Lectures

The Elements of Epistemic Style: Making Knowledge in Carnegie Libraries and Beyond

Nightingale-Brown House

Drawn from larger research project on late-19th and early-20th century American knowledge cultures, this lecture explores the cultural relevance of the funding program for public libraries started by the industrialist Andrew Carnegie in the late 1880s. Overall, the Carnegie Corporation payed for the construction of almost 1,700 library buildings in the U.S. and about 800 more in other countries. When the grant program was discontinued after World War I, roughly half of all American public libraries had been built with Carnegie endowments.

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