Lectures

Lectures

Peter Richards: Urbanature - Looking for Edges

Nightingale-Brown House

Peter Richards is a senior artist emeritus at the Exploratorium. He worked with its’ founder Frank Oppenheimer to set up the art programs and served as arts program director through 1998. He is best known for creating Wave Organ, (pictured) a wave-activated sound sculpture located on the San Francisco waterfront.  Peter has permanent outdoor installations at Artpark in Lewiston, New York, and in several sites in California, Arizona and Washington.

Lectures

Paul Taylor’s America: Songs of Innocence and Experience

Nightingale-Brown House

For more than 60 years, Paul Taylor has turned his choreographic lens on the United States. He is famous for dances that embody American ideals of democratic equality. But throughout his career, Taylor also has taken stock of the distance between our national mythology and the historical reality, warning of the corrosions of consumerism, the dangers of militarism, and the allure of demagogues. In this illustrated lecture, Taylor’s biographer Suzanne Carbonneau will look at how Taylor’s dances have chronicled both shining ideals and uncomfortable truths about America.

Lectures

Participatory Mapping and Youth Activism

Nightingale-Brown House

This talk spotlights Youth in Action's dedication to participatory learning through mapping and relocalization projects that invite youth to use maps to better understand themselves and their communities.  A map holds a unique narrative that has no predetermined beginning, and it’s this nature that lends itself to the honest, participatory experience of locating oneself.

Lectures

Panel Discussion - Who is a Refugee? What makes a Refuge? RI Stories of Immigrants and Refugees

>> OFF CAMPUS LOCATION: see description for details

Join us for a public forum and discussion on the stories, struggles, and successes of immigrant and refugee populations in Rhode Island.

The panel concludes a month of programming organized the Guantánamo Public Memory Project, which explores the history of the United States’ use of GTMO to house immigrants and refugees, as well as its post-9/11 use as a prison for suspected terrorists.

Lectures

Ours to Lose: Shared Authority and Controversial Histories

Nightingale-Brown House

Oral historians ground their ethics in the principle of “shared authority.” How does this work when the sources are personal but the story is collective? Who has authority over a shared and controversial history?

Lectures

Our Marathon: Reflections on The Boston Bombing Digital Archive

Nightingale-Brown House

Jim McGrath (Postdoctoral Fellow in Public Digital Humanities at the JNBC) will discuss his work as Project Director of 

Lectures

Notes from Doha

Nightingale-Brown House

While many cultural institutions in the US and Europe struggle to find funding to support programs and collections, cities in the Persian Gulf are on a tear, building up significant art collections and opening new museums at a dizzying pace. Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Sharjah and Doha are at the front of this race, investing billions in new educational and cultural institutions that they hope will provide the foundation for a future post-oil economy.

Lectures

Monument Lab: Creative Speculations for Public Art and History

Nightingale-Brown House
What is an appropriate monument for a current American city?

Lectures

Memory Madness: Japanese Americans, WWII Incarceration, and National Mythologies

Nightingale-Brown House

This presentation explores at least three related but separate levels of memory-making with regard to the incarceration of 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry during WWII. First, the official US Government positions. Second, mainstream media and historical treatments.

Lectures

Meeting of Curators on International Slavery

Lecture Room, Nightingale Brown House

The Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Hertiage, the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice and the John Carter Brown Library welcome public attendance at the following meeting of Curators on International Slavery.  RSVP to morning and evening sessions is required.  Please see the schedule and speakers below.

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