Lectures

Lectures

Participatory Mapping and Youth Activism

Nightingale-Brown House

This talk spotlights Youth in Action's dedication to participatory learning through mapping and relocalization projects that invite youth to use maps to better understand themselves and their communities.  A map holds a unique narrative that has no predetermined beginning, and it’s this nature that lends itself to the honest, participatory experience of locating oneself.

Lectures

Panel Discussion - Who is a Refugee? What makes a Refuge? RI Stories of Immigrants and Refugees

>> OFF CAMPUS LOCATION: see description for details

Join us for a public forum and discussion on the stories, struggles, and successes of immigrant and refugee populations in Rhode Island.

The panel concludes a month of programming organized the Guantánamo Public Memory Project, which explores the history of the United States’ use of GTMO to house immigrants and refugees, as well as its post-9/11 use as a prison for suspected terrorists.

Lectures

Ours to Lose: Shared Authority and Controversial Histories

Nightingale-Brown House

Oral historians ground their ethics in the principle of “shared authority.” How does this work when the sources are personal but the story is collective? Who has authority over a shared and controversial history?

Lectures

Our Marathon: Reflections on The Boston Bombing Digital Archive

Nightingale-Brown House

Jim McGrath (Postdoctoral Fellow in Public Digital Humanities at the JNBC) will discuss his work as Project Director of 

Lectures

Notes from Doha

Nightingale-Brown House

While many cultural institutions in the US and Europe struggle to find funding to support programs and collections, cities in the Persian Gulf are on a tear, building up significant art collections and opening new museums at a dizzying pace. Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Sharjah and Doha are at the front of this race, investing billions in new educational and cultural institutions that they hope will provide the foundation for a future post-oil economy.

Lectures

Monument Lab: Creative Speculations for Public Art and History

Nightingale-Brown House
What is an appropriate monument for a current American city?

Lectures

Memory Madness: Japanese Americans, WWII Incarceration, and National Mythologies

Nightingale-Brown House

This presentation explores at least three related but separate levels of memory-making with regard to the incarceration of 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry during WWII. First, the official US Government positions. Second, mainstream media and historical treatments.

Lectures

Meeting of Curators on International Slavery

Lecture Room, Nightingale Brown House

The Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Hertiage, the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice and the John Carter Brown Library welcome public attendance at the following meeting of Curators on International Slavery.  RSVP to morning and evening sessions is required.  Please see the schedule and speakers below.

Lectures

Mark Dion: Archaeology, Architectural Follies, Field Stations and Scientific Collections

RISD Museum, Metcalf Auditorium, Chace Center 20 North Main Street

Mark Dion uses scientific and archaeological methodologies to challenge perception and convention in museums and universities. His art examines the line between objective reality and subjective experience while holding a lens to the authoritative forces that shape our understanding of history, knowledge, and the natural world.

Lectures

Mark Dion: "An Account of Travels and Extraordinary Endeavors"

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Mark Dion’s art makes us think about how museums and universities shape our understandings of history and the natural world. His re-collections and re-creations question the lines between objective reality and subjective experience, using the forms of scientific and cultural institutions to reconsider those institutions. They subvert easy understanding of the past and the world around us, forcing us to look at the old in new ways.

Pages