Lectures

Lectures

Mark Dion: Archaeology, Architectural Follies, Field Stations and Scientific Collections

RISD Museum, Metcalf Auditorium, Chace Center 20 North Main Street

Mark Dion uses scientific and archaeological methodologies to challenge perception and convention in museums and universities. His art examines the line between objective reality and subjective experience while holding a lens to the authoritative forces that shape our understanding of history, knowledge, and the natural world.

Lectures

Mark Dion: "An Account of Travels and Extraordinary Endeavors"

Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Mark Dion’s art makes us think about how museums and universities shape our understandings of history and the natural world. His re-collections and re-creations question the lines between objective reality and subjective experience, using the forms of scientific and cultural institutions to reconsider those institutions. They subvert easy understanding of the past and the world around us, forcing us to look at the old in new ways.

Lectures

Making it Work: Deploying Public Humanities Skills in Public Sector Positions

Nightingale-Brown House

As Public Humanists, we all have a tremendous diversity of skills and interests, and during our time in the program, we refine those skills and hone those interests in preparation for long and fulfilling professional careers. Because of our adaptability, these careers can take any number of tracts. During this lunch talk, we’ll talk about how these skills can be great assets to the public sector, from working in government historical/cultural organizations like the National Park Service to managing construction projects for museums and cultural facilities at the state level.

Lectures

Making Colonial American Publishing Visible

Nightingale-Brown House

Jim Egan and Patrick Rashleigh will speak about their work visualizing the library catalog databases that serve as the foundation for Mapping Colonial Americas Publishing Project (http://cds.library.brown.edu/mapping-genres/).

Lectures

Lunch Talk: Applying a Human Rights Approach to Building a Public Humanities Initiative

Nightingale-Brown House

Over 2.3 million individuals are incarcerated in the United States. That means over 2.3 million families and communities are feeling the direct effects of mass incarceration, while our entire nation is confronted with the injustices of our criminal justice system on a weekly, or even daily basis. As individuals working in the public humanities, what do we owe those directly and indirectly affected by mass incarceration in terms of their humanity and our own?

Lectures

Lunch talk with Yes Men

Nightingale-Brown House

Jacques Servin and Igor Vamos, aka Andy Bichlbaum and Mike Bonanno, aka Yes Men, will talk about "Just Transition," focusing on how to get good food, a good wage, and a fossil-free campus.

Lunch will be provided. Kindly RSVP by Monday 10/12 here: http://goo.gl/forms/7G8cmhJ4oB

Lectures

Kerosene Lamp Church, the mission of Manuel Ricardo Martin and Central Congregational Church

Nightingale-Brown House

(a Lecture/Photo Presentation with Sylvia Ann Soares:)

Lectures

Karsonya Wise Whitehead, Writing Diversity lecture series

Nightingale-Brown House

Karsonya Wise Whitehead, Associate Professor of Communication and African and African American Studies at Loyola University Maryland, is also a historian, poet, filmmaker, archivist, essayist, and WYPR community commentator. Her talk, "Writing as an Act of Courage, An Expression of Reality, and a Blending of the Personal with the Political,” addresses issues she uncovered and experienced in documenting the Freddie Gray episode and the Baltimore Uprising in her home city.

Lectures

Introduction to Program Evaluation

Facilitated by Valerie Cooley, PhD, MSW , Lecturer, Director of Graduate Studies, Taubman Center for Public Policy, this seminar will provide an introduction to the key issues involved in the evaluation of social and cultural programs. We will briefly review the purpose and types of evaluation strategies. The emphasis of the seminar will focus on the articulation of program theory, distinguishing between program outputs and outcomes, and the challenge of determining program impact.

Have you ever wondered how public humanists integrate their projects and ways of thinking into their dissertations? Come hear Micah Salkind, JNBC Interdisciplinary Opportunities Fellow and 6th year Ph.D. candidate in American Studies, discuss his fieldwork in Chicago’s house music communities, as well as his incorporation of new oral histories, existing archives, and ethnographic research into his dissertation.

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