“They Tried to Bury Us. They Didn’t Know We Were Seeds.”

Nick & Vivi reflecting on Arshile Gorky’s The Artist and His Mother at Whitney Museum of American Art, NYCNick & Vivi reflecting on Arshile Gorky’s The Artist and His Mother at Whitney Museum of American Art, NYCEach winter, soon after welcoming a New Year, my family and friends enter the time of commemoration and remembrance.  On a frigid day of January 14, 1990, my dad and I began our 3-days long vigil at a Moscow airport. We were not alone. We joined a strange community that was united in grief, fear and hope waiting anxiously for each plane arriving from Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan.

(Distributed February 10, 2016)

Transatlantic Conversations: Dramaturgy as Public Humanities

Transatlantic Conversations, hosted by the Pomona College Department of Theatre and Dance was a collaborative class and devised theatre project that looked at the ways people of Africa, the African Diaspora and the west engage with each other.

(Distributed January 25, 2016)
Lecture

Talking About Audience Engagement is one thing, Measuring it is Another

Friday, February 5, 2016
12:00pm - 1:00pm

Nightingale-Brown House

Since Nina Simon published The Participatory Museum in 2010 and Anne Bergeron and Beth Tuttle released The Art & Science of Engagement in 2013, the topic of how museums and cultural institutions can engage visitors has exploded and field leaders like the IMLS have invested heavily in spurring innovations that activate participation.

Lecture

Lunch Talk: Micah Salkind

Thursday, March 24, 2016
12:00pm - 1:00pm

Nightingale-Brown House

Have you ever wondered how public humanists integrate their projects and ways of thinking into their dissertations? Come hear Micah Salkind, JNBC Interdisciplinary Opportunities Fellow and 6th year Ph.D. candidate in American Studies, discuss his fieldwork in Chicago’s house music communities, as well as his incorporation of new oral histories, existing archives, and ethnographic research into his dissertation.
Lecture

Notes from Doha

Thursday, March 10, 2016
12:00pm - 1:00pm

Nightingale-Brown House

While many cultural institutions in the US and Europe struggle to find funding to support programs and collections, cities in the Persian Gulf are on a tear, building up significant art collections and opening new museums at a dizzying pace. Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Sharjah and Doha are at the front of this race, investing billions in new educational and cultural institutions that they hope will provide the foundation for a future post-oil economy.

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