Faculty Research Grants

"Sacred Sites, Federal Indian Law, and the Future"

IBES Room 130, 85 Waterman Street

The political and social dynamics of American Indian sacred sites and basic human rights protections within the contemporary U.S. are constantly evolving. This panel, including various legal scholars, community leaders, and activists, will explore issues of human rights, self-determination, sovereignty, and potential International legal remedies in order to better understand the contemporary realities of misunderstanding, lack of social justice, U.S. constructed hierarchies of economic and political inequality, and overall legacies of colonialism.

Research Seminar with Yến Lê Espiritu, "Critical Refugee Studies: The Critical and the Creative"

photo of Yến Lê Espiritu

CSREA, 96 Waterman Street, Providence RI 02912

The hyper-focus on refugee suffering, desperation, and neediness in media and social science scholarship have represented refugees as passive recipients of western generosity and increasingly as the targets of racial profiling, surveillance, and detention. This seminar invites participants to chart new approaches to refugee studies that integrate theoretical rigor and policy concerns with refugees' rich and complicated lived worlds—approaches that fuse the critical and the creative.

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Yến Lê Espiritu, "Feminist Refugee Epistemology: Reading Displacement in Vietnamese and Syrian Refugee Art"

Petteruti Lounge, Stephen Robert '62 Center, 75 Waterman Street, Providence RI 02912

Joining the fields of transnational feminist studies with critical refugee studies, this talk introduces the concept feminist refugee epistemology (FRE) to re-conceptualize war-based displacement as not only about social disorder and interruption but also about social reproduction and innovation. FRE does more than critique Western media representation of refugees; it underlines the refugees' rich and complicated lives, the ways in which they enact their hopes, beliefs, and politics, even when they live militarized lives.

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Sofian Merabet, "Strange Hospitality: Gay Syrian Refugees in Lebanon"

IBES Room 130, 85 Waterman Street, Providence RI 02912

This paper engages with the Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon and, specifically, considers how queer-identified Syrians navigate an often-hostile environment in and around the Lebanese capital Beirut. Drawing on hospitality as a philosophical concept and on the sociological notion of the stranger, this paper focuses on discourses and aspirations these refugees express, in terms of language and bodily practices, in the face of what many experience as “hardened borders” within the social fabric of the host country. 

Research Seminar with Leisy J. Abrego, “Legal Violence and the Study of Marginalized Communities: Research Challenges and Responsibilities”

CSREA, 96 Waterman Street, Providence RI

We invite faculty and students to join us for a research seminar with Leisy J. Abrego, Associate Professor in Chicana/o Studies at UCLA, titled "Legal Violence and the Study of Marginalized Communities: Research Challenges and Responsibilities."

The Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series dynamically considers the crucial issues of racial, ethnicity and migration in the contexts of displacement.

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Leisy J. Abrego, “Liberation, Not Integration: Immigrant Activists Making Claims and Making Home in Los Angeles”

Smith-Buonanno, Room 106, 95 Cushing Street, Providence, RI 02912

Undocumented Latino immigrants envision their futures here. Current policies, however, restrict their ability to thrive. Without legalization, they are hindered in their use of the very mechanisms that ensured economic mobility for other immigrants throughout U.S. history: jobs, education, and social services. To this end, one sector of the undocumented immigrant population—the 1.5 generation (often called DREAMers)—has witnessed the benefits of collective mobilization.

Comparative Literature presents Lorgia García-Peña

CSREA, Lippitt House, 96 Waterman Street

"Writing from El Nié: Racexile and the Poetics of Dominicanidad in Diaspora"
Through a historicized reading of Dominican literature of exile and diaspora, this talk explores the ways diasporic Dominican blacks interpellate the nation(s) and archives, reclaiming el nié—neither here nor there— a space of belonging.

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