Faculty Research Grants

Panel Discussion: “Institutional Racism: The Sociology of Race and Organizations”

, Petteruti Lounge, Room 201

This event brings together three scholars working at the intersection of the sociology of race and the sociology of organizations to discuss how organizations “do” race and their role in producing or contesting racial inequality. The panelists will discuss how to conceptualize organizations as “racialized,” and how these forces shape everything from college student protests to prisoner re-Read More

Beloved Kin and Memory Lands: Panel Discussion

, Petteruti Lounge, Room 201

This panel explores ways at Brown that we can live up to our responsibilities to this land and its people. Comments from Brown University faculty, staff, and students:

  • Lorén Spears, Executive Director, Tomaquag Museum and Adjunct Lecturer, John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and
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Beloved Kin and Memory Lands: Keynote Presentations by Christine M. DeLucia and Lisa Brooks

, Petteruti Lounge, Room 201

Noted historians, both separately and in conversation, will offer a scholarly reconsideration of histories of King Philip’s War. Christine M. DeLucia is Associate Professor of History at Mount Holyoke College and author of Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast. Lisa Brooks is Professor of English andRead More

Beloved Kin and Memory Lands: Poetry Reading by Cheryl Savageau

, Room 305

Cheryl Savageau will read from her poetry collections, Dirt Road Home: Poems (1995), which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and Mother/Land (2006). Of Abenaki and French Canadian heritage, Savageau was born in central Massachusetts. Her poetry retells Abenaki stories, often focusing on the unrecognized lives of women and the working class; her work is enrichedRead More

“Equitable Care for the Incarcerated: Perspectives on the Past, Present, and Future”

, Room 108

Mass incarceration in the United States disproportionately affects communities of color and LGBTQ individuals, which results in profound and negative effects on community health. This discussion is part of a series titled, “The Impact of Incarceration on Community, Health, and Wellness,” which aims to provide an introduction to important themes that contribute to the overall experiences andRead More

"Sacred Sites, Federal Indian Law, and the Future"

IBES Room 130, 85 Waterman Street

The political and social dynamics of American Indian sacred sites and basic human rights protections within the contemporary U.S. are constantly evolving. This panel, including various legal scholars, community leaders, and activists, will explore issues of human rights, self-determination, sovereignty, and potential International legal remedies in order to better understand the contemporary realities of misunderstanding, lack of social justice, U.S. constructed hierarchies of economic and political inequality, and overall legacies of colonialism.

Research Seminar with Yến Lê Espiritu, "Critical Refugee Studies: The Critical and the Creative"

photo of Yến Lê Espiritu

CSREA, 96 Waterman Street, Providence RI 02912

The hyper-focus on refugee suffering, desperation, and neediness in media and social science scholarship have represented refugees as passive recipients of western generosity and increasingly as the targets of racial profiling, surveillance, and detention. This seminar invites participants to chart new approaches to refugee studies that integrate theoretical rigor and policy concerns with refugees' rich and complicated lived worlds—approaches that fuse the critical and the creative.

Critical Migration and Refugee Studies Series: Yến Lê Espiritu, "Feminist Refugee Epistemology: Reading Displacement in Vietnamese and Syrian Refugee Art"

Petteruti Lounge, Stephen Robert '62 Center, 75 Waterman Street, Providence RI 02912

Joining the fields of transnational feminist studies with critical refugee studies, this talk introduces the concept feminist refugee epistemology (FRE) to re-conceptualize war-based displacement as not only about social disorder and interruption but also about social reproduction and innovation. FRE does more than critique Western media representation of refugees; it underlines the refugees' rich and complicated lives, the ways in which they enact their hopes, beliefs, and politics, even when they live militarized lives.

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