Lectures, Discussions + Conferences

Grad Student Race and Ethnicity Professional Development Workshop

CSREA, Lippitt House, 96 Waterman Street

CSREA has launched a race and ethnicity focussed graduate student professionalization and development series to support graduate student research on race and ethnicity, build research community across disciplines, and support our graduate student professional development.

We invite graduate students to send their RSVPs to [email protected] for any one or all of the seminars listed below. Seats are limited.

Symposium: The U.S. Immigration Regime and the Politics of Belonging [VIDEO]

IBES 130 (Carmichael Auditorium)

On April 7, 2017, CSREA will be presenting a symposium entitled, The U.S. Immigration Regime and the Politics of Belonging. How have immigration laws developed over the past century and how do these policies continue to affect the country today? For example, what are the legacies of IRCA and IRRIRA and how are these policies being amended and applied today?

Third Rail Series Lecture and Diversity and Inclusion Summit Plenary: Robin DiAngelo, "White Fragility and Its Impact on Diversity and Inclusion Efforts on Campus" [VIDEO]

Pembroke Hall, Room 305, 172 Meeting Street, Providence RI 02912

CSREA is delighted to partner with the Office of Institutional Diversity to bring Robin DiAngelo to campus as part of the Diversity & Inclusion Summit, and to serve as CSREA's annual Third Rail Lecture Series speaker. Her talk is entitled, "White Fragility and Its Impact on Diversity and Inclusion Efforts on Campus."

Sarah Haley, "Gender, Punishment, and Jim Crow Modernity"

Petteruti Lounge, Stephen Robert '62 Center, 75 Waterman Street

Black women’s imprisonment in the South during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was central to the development of carceral capitalism and consolidated normative conceptions of race, gender, and sexuality. This talk will examine how the criminalization of black women shaped the development of modern political, economic, and cultural life under Jim Crow, while also considering women’s resistance and refusal in southern prisons as practices of black radicalism and abolitionist feminism.

Sarah Haley, "Gender, Punishment, and Jim Crow Modernity"

Petteruti Lounge, Stephen Robert '62 Center, 75 Waterman Street

Black women’s imprisonment in the South during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was central to the development of carceral capitalism and consolidated normative conceptions of race, gender, and sexuality. This talk will examine how the criminalization of black women shaped the development of modern political, economic, and cultural life under Jim Crow, while also considering women’s resistance and refusal in southern prisons as practices of black radicalism and abolitionist feminism.

Jeanine Staples, "You Need Another Lover: How White Supremacist Patriarchal Ideologies Prompt The Generation Of Toxic Lover Identities In Black Women And How Those Identities Are Killing Us" [VIDEO]

Pembroke Hall, Room 305

In this public lecture, scholar, educator, and activist Jeanine Staples will share her groundbreaking research on the five toxic lover identities defensively constructed among marginalized women who have suffered from unmediated relational and social t/Terrors. In her presentation, Dr. Staples will illuminate the complex sociocultural and socioemotional consequences of these identities and offer a solution that can salvage not only the souls and soma of these women, but also the social and emotional justice movements they have founded and advance for the benefit of all humankind.

#NoDAPL Teach-In

MacMillan Hall, Room 115

A Teach-In about Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline and the resistance movement #NoDAPL. Hosted by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA).

Friday, December 9, 2016
12:15pm - 1:45pm
MacMillan Hall, Room 115
167 Thayer Street, Providence RI 02912

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