Lectures, Discussions + Conferences

"How Structural Racism Works," Our History Lives in Our Homes

Pembroke Hall, Room 305 - 172 Meeting Street, Providence, RI 02912

Please join us on Friday, March 4, at 12:00 pm (lunch provided) for “How Structural Racism Works,” a lecture by Tom Shapiro, Pokross Professor of Law and Social Policy and Director of the Institute on Assets and Social Policy at Brandeis. Tom Shapiro will speak over lunch about his research, particularly the role homeownership, race and intergenerational inheritance, which led to his book, The Hidden Cost of Being African American: How Wealth Perpetuates Inequality.

How Structural Racism Works: A Roundtable Conversation

Building for Environmental Research & Teaching (BERT), Room 130 - 85 Waterman Street, Providence, RI 02912

Please join us on Wednesday, February 17, at 6:30 pm for “How Structural Racism Works,” a Brown faculty and Postdoctoral Fellow roundtable discussion, led by Tricia Rose, Director, Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA) and sponsored by the Office of the Provost. The discussion will focus on the role of structural racism in contemporary US society and its relationships to neoliberalism, racial ideology, immigration, gender, poverty and more.

How Structural Racism Works: Inaugural Lecture

Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center for the Creative Arts - 154 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912

Structural racism–the normalized and legitimized range of policies, practices, and attitudes that routinely produce cumulative and chronic adverse outcomes for people of color, especially black people–is the main driver of racial inequality in America today. Professor Tricia Rose's compelling new in-progress research, video and public engagement project called "How Structural Racism Works" serves as the foundation for this important lecture/workshop series. Over the course of the spring and fall 2016 semesters, the project considers five key areas that propel structural racism: housing, education, wealth, criminal justice, and mass media.

What I Am Thinking About Now: Jayanti Owens, "Gender, Race, and Early Childhood Behavior Problems Across Two Decades"

CSREA Conference Room, Hillel 303

Coloring the "Boys Will be Boys" Chronicle: Gender, Race, and Early Childhood Behavior Problems Across Two Decades

Jayanti Owens, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Public Policy.

The BreakBeat Poets: Performance + Book Signing

George Houston Bass Performing Arts Space, Churchill House

Just as blues influenced the Harlem Renaissance and Jazz influenced the Black Arts Movement, Hip-Hop's musical and cultural force has shaped the aesthetics and given rise to a new generation of American poets.

Join us as we welcome contributors to the new poetry anthology The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop-- a multi-generational examination of life and poetry in the age of hip hop. The book features 78 poets, born between 1961-1999, who are employing traditional and wildstyle poetics to narrate a new country and city landscape.

Eduardo Mendieta, "The Five Institutions of U.S. Racism: On Angela Y. Davis's Abolitionism"

Hillel, Meeting Room (2nd Floor), 80 Brown Street

In this talk, Professor Mendieta will consider the under-examined and original philosophical contributions of Angela Y. Davis. He will argue that she bridges Marxist inspired historical materialism, through the mediation of Marcusian critical theory,Foucauldian genealogies of punishment and confinement, Black feminist analysis, the intersectionality of race, gender, and class, and a century old American autochthonous Black critical political philosophy. 

First Readings: The New Jim Crow Lecture

Smith-Buonanno, Room 106

Following up on The New Jim Crow: The Past, Present and Future of Policing and Mass Incarceration in America

Please join us to extend the conversation about Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow with a panel of activists and scholars with deep experience in civil and human rights law, the politics of mass incarceration, and contemporary efforts, on and off campus, to address the intersection of policing, prisons, and race.

Commencement Forum: A Conversation with Tracee Ellis Ross ’94

Salomon Center, Room 101 (De Ciccio Family Auditorium)

Tracee Ellis Ross '94, an honorary degree recipient, is widely recognized for her comedic roles as Joan Clayton in Girlfriends and more recently as Dr. Rainbow Johnson in the series black-ish. Ms. Ross graduated from Brown University in 1994 with a bachelor’s degree in theater arts and will be awarded an honorary degree during this year’s Commencement. Professor Tricia Rose '93 PhD, Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, will interview Ms. Ross and Vice Provost for the Arts Michael Steinberg will introduce the forum.

"The Gospel of Healing Volume I: Black Churches Respond to HIV/AIDS" Film Screening + Panel Discussion

Smith-Buonanno, Room 106, 95 Cushing Street

The Gospel of Healing Volume I: Black Churches Respond to HIV/AIDS is a documentary film that profiles five innovative models of faith-based HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and/or care primarily targeting African American communities. Viewers will learn how these HIV health ministries were established, what factors contribute to their effectiveness in their communities, what were their common views on faith, healing and the role of the church as the Black community’s primary source of social justice and leadership, in the post-civil rights era.

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