Lectures, Discussions + Conferences

Beloved Kin and Memory Lands: Keynote Presentations by Christine M. DeLucia and Lisa Brooks

, Petteruti Lounge, Room 201

Noted historians, both separately and in conversation, will offer a scholarly reconsideration of histories of King Philip’s War. Christine M. DeLucia is Associate Professor of History at Mount Holyoke College and author of Memory Lands: King Philip’s War and the Place of Violence in the Northeast. Lisa Brooks is Professor of English andRead More

What I Am Thinking About Now: Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman, “A Tenuous Hold, Or Black Feminist Meditations on the Black Masculine”

, Room 103

Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman, Associate Professor of American Studies and English at Brown University.

“A Tenuous Hold, Or Black Feminist Meditations on the Black Masculine”
In general, black people are vulnerable to demise or disappearanceRead More

What I Am Thinking About Now: Anthony Bogues, “Black Critique: Race, Freedom and Capitalism”

, Room 103

Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Anthony Bogues, Asa Messer Professor of Humanities and Critical Theory and Director of the Center of the Study of Slavery and Justice at Brown University.

“Black Critique: Race, Freedom & Capitalism”
There is currently aRead More

What I Am Thinking About Now: Lisa Biggs, “Black Women, Prisoner Art, and Transformation”

, Room 103

Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Lisa Biggs, Assistant Professor, Department of Africana Studies/Rites and Reason Theatre, Brown University.

“Black Women, Prisoner Art, and Transformation”
Though largely overlooked in dominant discourses about mass incarceration,Read More

Policing, Warfare, Incarceration: A History of Urban Violence

Department of Africana Studies/Rites and Reason Theatre, History, CSREA and CSSJ
, Stephen Robert Hall 101

Please join Harvard Assistant Professor of History and of African and African American Studies, Elizabeth Hinton, for her lecture, Policing, Warfare, Incarceration: ARead More

Hip Hop Lecture Series: Akua Naru in conversation with Tricia Rose

, Carmichael Auditorium, Room 130

Professor Tricia Rose’s 1994 award-winning book, Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America, is considered foundational text for the study of hip hop, one that has defined what is now an entire field of study. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Black Noise, Professor Rose and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at BrownRead More

J. Kēhaulani Kauanui, “Decolonization in Settler Colonial Context: Challenging the ‘Logic of Elimination of the Native’”

, Joukowsky Forum

In hegemonic legal discourse, as well as dominant academic paradigms, discussions of decolonization most often take (former) franchise colonies as their point of reference. Postcolonial theory itself emerged from the study of the cultural legacy of colonialism and imperialism, and how it endures after putative decolonization. But what sort of decolonization is possible in settler colonialRead More

‘Blood and Soil!’: White Supremacy and the American City

CSREA, History and American Studies
, Joukowsky Forum

“'Blood and Soil!’: White Supremacy and the American City” - a talk by Nathan D.B. Connolly, Herbert Baxter Adams Associate Professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. This presentation is part of a series titled “Segregated: Structural Racism and the Shaping of American Cities,” which examines how space and race have intersected in American cities for generations to produce dramaticRead More

“95 and 6 to Go” Screening and Filmmaker Q. and A.

, Room 120

In this moving portrait, filmmaker Kimi Takesue finds an unlikely collaborator while visiting her resilient Japanese-American grandfather in Hawai’i. A recent widower in his 90s, Grandpa Tom immerses himself in his daily routines until he shows unexpected interest in his granddaughter’s stalled romantic screenplay and offers advice both shrewd and surprising. Tom’s creative script revisionsRead More

Algorithmic Justice: Race, Bias, and Big Data

Data Science Initiative and the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America
, Carmichael Auditorium, Room 130

Data are not objective; algorithms have biases; machine learning doesn’t produce truth. These realities have uneven effects on people’s lives, often serving to reinforce existing systemic biases and social inequalities. At the same time, data can be used in the service of social justice, and taking control of the data produced about people and its use is more andRead More

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