Lectures, Discussions + Conferences

Seeing Beyond the Veil: Race-ing Key Concepts in Political Theory (Day 1 of 2)

Presented by the Department of Political Science, the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, and the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women.
, Room 305

Download a complete conference program with agenda and speaker information.

How does work on race push us to reformulate or abandon established concepts in political theory? Participants in this conference draw on the archive of black politicalRead More

Karen Inouye, “The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration”

, Room 106

The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration reexamines the history of imprisonment of U.S. and Canadian citizens of Japanese descent during World War II. Karen M. Inouye explores how historical events can linger in individual and collective memory and then crystallize in powerful moments of political engagement. Drawing on interviews and untapped

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Pawan Dhingra, “The Racialization of ‘Honorary Whites’: Asian Americans and New Conceptions of Race”

, Petteruti Lounge (Room 201)

As scholars formulate race beyond the black-white binary, immigrants classified as “honorary whites” have proven both crucial and elusive. Current racial formulations delineate three main categories: whites, honorary whites, and collective blacks. Whites and collective blacks represent the binary poles of a racial hierarchy, where practically all attention to raceRead More

Tanya K. Hernández, “Multiracials and Civil Rights: Mixed-Race Stories of Discrimination”

, Room 130

In her new book “Multiracials and Civil Rights: Mixed-Race Stories of Discrimination,” Professor Tanya Katerí Hernández explores the question of how to pursue racial equality in a growing multiracial world. The growth of a mixed-race population has led some commentators to proclaim that multiracial discrimination is distinct in nature fromRead More

“Equitable Care for the Incarcerated: Perspectives on the Past, Present, and Future”

, Room 108

Mass incarceration in the United States disproportionately affects communities of color and LGBTQ individuals, which results in profound and negative effects on community health. This discussion is part of a series titled, “The Impact of Incarceration on Community, Health, and Wellness,” which aims to provide an introduction to important themes that contribute to the overall experiences andRead More

Martha S. Jones, "Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America"

, Room 130, 85 Waterman Street, Providence RI 02912

Birthright Citizens tells how African American activists radically transformed the terms of citizenship for all Americans. Before the Civil War, colonization schemes and black laws threatened to deport former slaves born in the United States. Birthright Citizens recovers the story of how African American activists remade national belongingRead More

Black Alumni Reunion Event: “Telling Us Who We Are: The Importance of Black Arts, Media, and Culture Today”

This conversation among alumni artists, journalists, and producers considers the important and changing role of media, art, and storytelling in shaping community and racial and ethnic imaginations in contemporary society.

Moderator: Tricia Rose AM’87 PhD’93, P’14, Chancellor’s Professor of Africana Studies, Associate Dean of the Faculty for Special Initiatives,Read More

A Conversation with Chris Hayes ’01

, Martinos Auditorium, 154 Angell St, Providence, RI 02906

"An essential and groundbreaking text in the effort to understand how American criminal justice went so badly awry." —Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of Between the World and Me

In A Colony in a NationNew York Times best-selling author and Emmy Award-winning news anchor Chris Hayes ’01 upends the national conversation on policing and democracy.Read More

Commencement Forum: Tricia Rose '93 PhD, "How Structural Racism Works"

IBES 130 (Carmichael Auditorium), 85 Waterman Street, Providence, RI 02912

This presentation shares ideas from Tricia Rose's on-going research project, which aims to make accessible to the public what structural racism is and how it works in society. The project examines the connections between policies and practices in housing, education and other key spheres of society to reveal the intersectional and compounding effects of systemic discrimination as a significant force in American society today. 

Elsa Stamatopoulou, "Indigenous Peoples' Cultural Heritage as a Human Right: Today's Emergency"

Petteruti Lounge, Stephen Robert '62 Center, 75 Waterman St, Providence RI 02912

What does it mean to see Indigenous Peoples’ Cultural Heritage as a Human Right and why does it matter? How can we correct the invisibility imposed by a settler colonial system of “the doctrine of discovery” and of “empty lands”? How can we create a true pluricultural democracy, where the identity, culture, traditional knowledge and history of Native Americans and all Indigenous Peoples, and others will be respected and protected, instead of being destroyed by state and non-state actors? In this country, the Bears Ears and Chaco struggles today are linked to Standing Rock, to Wounded Knee and to many previous struggles since the time of colonization that have inspired the Indigenous Movement in this country and around the world. The preservation of Indigenous Peoples’ Cultural heritage is a human rights matter for all.
 

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