Courses for Spring 2019

  • Perspectives on Society: An Introduction to Sociology

    An introduction to the discipline of sociology from both a micro and macro perspective. Students explore how different sociological paradigms lead to contrasting understandings of capitalism, the state, class, race, and gender. In addition, students learn new ways to think about social problems in the United States, in the developing world, and in world history.
    SOC 0010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Economic Development and Social Change

    Emphasis on understanding the interrelations among economic, political, and cultural aspects of change in developing countries. The experience of currently developing nations is contrasted to that of nations which industrialized in the 19th century. Compares the different development strategies which have been adopted by currently developing nations and their consequences for social change.
    SOC 0150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
  • Theory and Practice of Engaged Scholarship (ESP Seminar)

    Efforts are underway across university and college campuses -- in the United States and globally -- to increase opportunities for engaged learning and research. What is engaged scholarship and how does it challenge (and/or complement) more traditional concepts of scholarship and disciplinary knowledge? What are the ethical, practical, and other challenges associated with community-engaged scholarship? The course will use case studies, field work, team projects, and guest speakers from diverse disciplines and sectors to investigate these and other questions. Enrollment limited to Engaged Scholars Program participants. Limited to 40 students per section.
    SOC 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hance
  • Methods of Social Research

    This course introduces students to the frameworks and methods of conducting sociological research -- from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. The aim is that students develop the skills to ask and answer interesting and important questions about sociological phenomenon. The focus is on designing and executing research, from identifying an interesting question and reviewing the relevant literature, to collecting and analyzing data, to drawing reliable inferences and presenting meaningful results. There is a heavy focus on reading and discussing academic research and working in research teams. By the end of the semester students will complete their own research projects.
    SOC 1020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Introductory Statistics for Social Research

    Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: measures of central tendencies and variability, sampling, tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Also includes the use of computers in data analysis. Knowledge of elementary algebra is assumed. Enrollment is limited to 144 students.
    SOC 1100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    SOC 1100 L01
    Schedule Code
    L: Lab
    SOC 1100 L02
    Schedule Code
    L: Lab
    SOC 1100 L03
    Schedule Code
    L: Lab
    SOC 1100 L04
    Schedule Code
    L: Lab
    SOC 1100 L05
    Schedule Code
    L: Lab
    SOC 1100 L06
    Schedule Code
    L: Lab
  • Law and Society

    A broad exploration of contemporary social-science scholarship on law and legal institutions, covering competing theoretical perspectives and drawing examples from diverse empirical settings. Lectures and discussions survey different ways in which social scientists study legal life, seeking contrasts and commonalities across the various perspectives. Coverage includes: Social-psychological models of rule-following and rule-breaking; social-structural linkages between law and the economy, stratification, and politics; and the dynamic relationship between law and social change--including the role of lawyers, judges and juries in giving law "independent causal significance." Strongly recommended: previous coursework in the social sciences.
    SOC 1114 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Context Research for Innovation

    This course brings design thinking into conversation with qualitative research methods, examining the elements of a comprehensive perspective of context. It introduces students to design research methods, ethnographic research methods, and how they work together. Students will learn how to use these methods to identify and engage in "deep hanging out" with the problem, gap or inefficiency in question. They will then move on to patient contextualized opportunity identification for meaningful innovation. By the end of the course, students will have developed a process for effective, through innovation context analysis. Relevant for designers of products, services, organizations , and experience.
    SOC 1118 S01
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
  • Market and Social Surveys

    This course covers the theory and practice of survey research. Topics include questionnaire design and formatting; sample design and selection; interviewing techniques; data base design and data entry; and elementary data analysis and report production. Students individually design and conduct a survey on a topic of their choice, and collectively conduct and analyze a sample survey of the Brown student population.
    SOC 1120 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Future of Work

    The Future of Work refers to technological advances in brain science, AI, blockchain, machine and deep learning that have the potential to substantially change our work experiences, organizations and society. These changes can bring many positive benefits and also raise ethical concerns when technology is used to predict human behavior, replace employees, create a contingent/low-wage workforce, or drive autonomous vehicles. This class will examine how the world of work is changing, how these changes relate to organizations and entrepreneurship, and what skills are necessary to shape the Future of Work in ways that are sustainable, ethical and inclusive.
    SOC 1220 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ozkazanc-Pan
  • What Do Schools Do?

    Education is an important institution in modern societies. Schools influence all of our lives from an early age. Schools are the largest employer in many communities and are widely considered the major force for social equality. What does this mean for society? What do schools do? Why do some students learn more than others? How do schools reduce or reproduce social inequality? How do schools influence society and how does society shape schools? We will consider these and other related questions in this course.
    SOC 1230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
  • Migration in the Americas

    This course examines historical trends and determinants of migration from Latin America to the United States. Each stage of the migration process is examined: the decision to migrate, getting across international borders, settlement and integration in destinations, and return to places of origin. This is a GELT (Global Experiential Learning and Teaching) class. During the spring recess the class will travel to Mexico City and the U.S.-Mexico border at San Diego-Tijuana. Two years of college Spanish or the equivalent is required. Introductory statistics and/or research methods is strongly recommended. Enrollment limited to 12.
    SOC 1281 S01
    Interested students should apply online by 5:00pm on Friday, October 26th at https://goo.gl/forms/Ge8ORjIljkYCZMlJ2.
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
  • Macro-Organizational Theory: Organizations in Social Context

    Macro-Organizational Theory focuses on the organization and its social/economic environment. This class will explore various definitions of the organization’s environment, and the many types of macro-level organizational structures in which sets of organizations interact, function, compete, and cooperate. Important questions to be asked include the following:

    -What is an organizational environment and how do organizations “deal” with what is outside of their boundaries?

    -How are the boundaries of organizations defined/recognized/function?

    -How do environments influence organizational strategy and performance?

    -What are the major theories for assessing macro-level organizational phenomena?

    -What are the many ways in which organizations relate to other organizations?
    SOC 1315 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    SOC 1315 C01
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C03
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C04
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
  • Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems

    An introduction to the fundamental principles and methods of geographic information systems (GIS). Topics include (a) handling different types of geographic datasets, (b) geo-analytical and modeling tools in GIS, (c) conceptual and theoretical aspects of GIS application development, and (d) errors and uncertainty analysis of GIS applications. Laboratory assignments and the project work provide hands on experiences in GIS. Enrollment limited to 21 juniors and seniors.
    SOC 1340 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mwenda
  • Social Structure and Personal Development

    The relationship between one's place in the social structure and one's own personal growth. Investigates the social aspects of individual growth and change throughout the life course. Also examines social factors involved in the failure to find a meaningful place for oneself in society.
    SOC 1430 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Sociology of Medicine

    The aim of this course is to give conceptual framework and some analytic tools to examine the context of health, illness and well-being at the micro, meso and macro levels. The focus of our attention will be on health inequalities: how they are produced, their relationships with socioeconomic status, and how to minimize their effects. Special attention will be given to the phenomenon of medicalization, to the ways in which a diagnosis is socially constructed, issues of social justice and equity, and the implications of biotechnological innovation and the rise of health and wellness-oriented culture.
    SOC 1550 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reynolds
  • Comparative Urban Political Economy

    For the first time, most people across the globe live in cities. Inequalities within both nations and cities are increasingly similar across national boundaries. This course ask how the politics of formal and informal institutions in cities produce and change inequalities of shelter, work, race, and other social identities, across urban space. We analyze cases from across the globe, along with a range of social science methods and theoretical perspectives.
    SOC 1871X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bradlow
  • The Sociology of Time

    Time is a shared social construction around which people construct their daily lives, plan their futures, and remember their histories. Time, however, is also contested. Variations in social and political power throughout history have shaped how we measure, experience, and control time. In other words, a minute is not just a minute; a day not just a day. But rather, units of time – and their conceptualization, measurement, and distribution – determine the ebbs and flows of the social world. This course will consider how people spend their time alongside the historical and institutional lineages of contemporary understandings of time.
    SOC 1871Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bouek
  • Global Sociology: Capitalism, Colonialism and the Making of the Modern World

    This course focuses on Providence and Rhode Island to look at the embeddedness of local lives in global social processes. Sociology often takes the nation as a bounded unit of analysis. Yet, the history of the modern world is one of empires, colonialism and transnational connections. These global racial and colonial histories are frequently ignored or silenced. This course seeks to question our sense of place in the world: If we acknowledge that the world has always been global, how does that change our understanding of contemporary issues? How should we rethink sociology to break with its colonial origins?
    SOC 1872E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • First-Generation College Students: A Sociological Perspective: A Sophomore Seminar

    Colleges have expanded their focus on diversity to include the social class origins of prospective students. One consequence is the emergence of the notion of first-generation college students: those who are the first in their families to attend college. We examine the challenges facing first-gens as they pursue higher education, focusing on two sources of difficulty: gaining admission and acclimating oneself to college, both academically and socially.Our goals are two-fold: (1) To understand the social barriers, compromises, and internal conflicts that first-generation college students face, and, (2) consider how institutional and structural forces impact and shape these students.
    SOC 1872G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Individual Research Project

    Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Required of intensive concentrators; open to others only by written consent of the Chair of the department. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Johnson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Ozkazanc-Pan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis

    Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Multivariate Statistical Methods II

    This course is a graduate-level introduction to multivariate regression models for categorical and limited dependent variables. Subject matter includes modeling nominal and ordinal outcomes; truncated distributions; and selection processes. The course also reviews strategies for sample design; handling missing data and weighting in multivariate models. The course employs contemporary statistical software. Special emphasis is placed on model selection and interpretation. Prerequisite: SOC 2010
    SOC 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
  • Contemporary Sociology

    This class offers a review of some of the most interesting contemporary social theorists and the most intense debates in current sociological thought. It thematically reviews the works of Jurgen Habermas on the public sphere, Michel Foucault on disciplinary and governmental modes of power, Bruno Latour on modernity and modern science, Pierre Bourdieu on field and habitus and among others. No prerequisites.
    SOC 2050 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
  • Culture and Social Structure

    An analysis of the interrelations of religious ideas, value patterns, and various forms of knowledge on the one hand, and of the societal structures and changes in organizations and roles on the other hand. Offered in alternate years.
    SOC 2090 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Qualitative Methods

    Emphasis on ethnographic field work through participant observation and interviews. Some attention to content analysis and visual sociology. Technical training in developing observational and interview guidelines, data collection, coding, transcript analysis, and computer applications. Strong emphasis on quality writing. Analysis of ethnographic research in book and article format. Attention to recent developments in ethnography, especially reflexivity and autoethnography.
    SOC 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
  • Techniques of Demographic Analysis

    Procedures and techniques for the collection, evaluation, and analysis of demographic data; measures of population composition, fertility, morality, and migration; construction of life tables, population and projections, population dynamics; responsible use of demographic methodology. Mandatory S/NC.
    SOC 2230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
  • Master's Thesis and Proposal Writing Seminar

    Sociology 2420 is a graduate seminar on the craft of social-science writing. Writing is not easy for most of us, and it can sometimes be frustrating. Through out-of-class writing and recurrent in-class review the course explores strategies for making your writing more effective, more productive, and hopefully more enjoyable. The seminar’s goal is to help graduate students to advance and complete their writing tasks, whatever they are working on. It is open to students working on a variety of goals such as writing their MA, their dissertation proposal, a research proposal, or a journal article.
    SOC 2420 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • Teaching Practicum in Sociology

    This course is designed for sociology graduate students whose funding has prohibited a teaching assistantship but who need to complete the departmental teaching requirement. The instructor for this course will default as the department chair but it is the graduate student's responsibility to identify an instructor to work alongside. This partnership must be approved by the director of graduate study.
    SOC 2510 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
  • Global and Transnational Sociology

    The new phase of capitalism, commonly called "globalization," has radically transformed the postwar order. In this seminar, we will review several debates regarding current political-economic transformations, including: What caused the shift to neo-liberalism? What external economic pressures do states experience? Can domestic factors mediate such pressures? How do developing countries react to the new international environment? And what role does the United States and international organizations play in the new order?
    SOC 2960F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
  • Sociology of Organizations Graduate Seminar

    The sociology of organizations offers a burgeoning and vibrant literature, with relevance not only for self-identified organizational sociologists, but also for scholars in fields as diverse as politics, development, industrial relations, finance, education, health care, and the arts. This seminar offers an intensive exploration of the "state of play" in contemporary macro-organizational theory. Shared and individual readings, coupled with weekly discussions and email dialogues, allow students to refine and extend their thinking on a series of important and controversial topics in the recent literature. Although this course has no formal prerequisites, the syllabus is aimed primarily at graduate students who enjoy some prior familiarity with organizational theory, whether in sociology or a kindred discipline. Enrollment limited to 15.
    SOC 2960M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Social Theory Now

    Most courses in social theory cover either “classical theory” (stopping around WWII) or “contemporary theory” (stopping in the early 1990s). This course offers a broad overview of recent trends and new directions in social theory. It focuses on works published since 2000 by sociologists and by theorists that have been influential in sociology. The course covers conversations in “metatheory” around mechanisms and fields, science studies approaches to the body and nature, diverging interpretations of the place of culture, debates around identity, and critical perspectives including feminist theory and postcolonial theory.
    SOC 2960Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
  • Sociology of Education

    This course provides an overview of Sociology of Education, covering substantive, theoretical, and methodological issues in the field. Beginning with classical theories of education, the course will then provide an overview of the relationship between education and society, with a focus on its role in reducing and reproducing inequality. We will discuss causes and consequences of educational inequality, paying particular attention to education and the labor market. In the process, we will engage with ascriptive forms of stratification, including gender, race, and ethnicity. The focus of the course is education in the U.S., but we will occasionally incorporate international comparisons.
    SOC 2961E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SOC 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 2981 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Ozkazanc-Pan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Directed Research Practicum - MSAR Students Only

    The Directed Research Practicum is a one semester course taken in conjunction with an on- or off-campus research internship. The course consists of a directed reading of methodological texts and research articles selected by the student and the faculty director that are directly relevant to the methodological issues/challenges encountered in the internship. The student and faculty director will meet weekly to review the readings. The practicum may include written assignments, literature reviews, and data analysis exercises. Faculty directors need not be involved with the actual internship work, unless the student is working on the faculty member’s research project.
    SOC 2982 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Dissertation Preparation

    For Sociology PhD graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    SOC 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep