Courses for Spring 2017

  • Culture, Power and Social Change

    Revolution and Social Movements. Urbanization and Globalization. War and Genocide. These are all examples of social change, and sociology, the discipline for which this course serves as introduction, seeks to understand, and explain, them all and other transformations too. We focus in particular on how technology and power relations help us explain variations in social change, and how culture shapes our recognition and evaluation of those transformations. Although analyzing the USA today is our common ground, our method is both comparative (other societies) and historical (focusing especially on the 20th and 21st centuries).
    SOC 0010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Economic Development and Social Change

    Emphasis on understanding the interrelations among economic, political, and cultural aspects of change in developing countries. The experience of currently developing nations is contrasted to that of nations which industrialized in the 19th century. Compares the different development strategies which have been adopted by currently developing nations and their consequences for social change.
    SOC 0150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
  • The Family

    The state of the contemporary family generates debate within and beyond sociology. That debate is considered by examining different definitions of family, changing gender roles within the family, and the family in cross-cultural context. Special issues include new family forms, such as gay and lesbian families and biological and step-parenthood, as well as changing patterns of work and housework.
    SOC 0170 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Who Am I?

    A study of self in contemporary society. We examine the structural and situational forces that shape the self and their impact on personal development, orientations to the world, and interpersonal behavior; we investigate the development of the self as a way of being in the world that makes everyday doings and, ultimately society, possible. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. Instructor permission required. FYS WRIT
    SOC 0300D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Theory and Practice of Engaged Scholarship (ESP Seminar)

    Efforts are underway across university and college campuses -- in the United States and globally -- to increase opportunities for engaged learning and research. What is engaged scholarship and how does it challenge (and/or complement) more traditional concepts of scholarship and disciplinary knowledge? What are the ethical, practical, and other challenges associated with community-engaged scholarship? The course will use case studies, field work, team projects, and guest speakers from diverse disciplines and sectors to investigate these and other questions. Enrollment limited to Engaged Scholars Program participants. Limited to 20 students per section.
    SOC 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hance
  • Methods of Social Research

    This course introduces students to the frameworks and methods of conducting sociological research -- from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. The aim is that students develop the skills to ask and answer interesting and important questions about sociological phenomenon. The focus is on designing and executing research, from identifying an interesting question and reviewing the relevant literature, to collecting and analyzing data, to drawing reliable inferences and presenting meaningful results. There is a heavy focus on reading and discussing academic research and working in research teams. By the end of the semester students will complete their own research projects.
    SOC 1020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    SOC 1020 C01
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    C: Conference
    SOC 1020 C02
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    C: Conference
    SOC 1020 C03
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    C: Conference
  • Introductory Statistics for Social Research

    Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: measures of central tendencies and variability, sampling, tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Also includes the use of computers in data analysis. Knowledge of elementary algebra is assumed. Enrollment is limited to 144 students.
    SOC 1100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fussell
    SOC 1100 C01
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C02
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    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C03
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    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C04
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    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C05
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    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C06
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    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 L01
    Primary Instructor
    Fussell
    Schedule Code
    L: Lab
  • Market and Social Surveys

    This course covers the theory and practice of survey research. Topics include questionnaire design and formatting; sample design and selection; interviewing techniques; data base design and data entry; and elementary data analysis and report production. Students individually design and conduct a survey on a topic of their choice, and collectively conduct and analyze a sample survey of the Brown student population.
    SOC 1120 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • EPIC: Ethnographic Praxis in Industry

    A community of practitioners and their eponymous annual gathering, EPIC promotes the use and value of ethnography in industry. EPIC people work to ensure that innovation, strategies, processes and products address business opportunities that are anchored in what matters to people in their everyday lives today and over time. This course explores the tools and resources used by ethnographers in industry. We will study the EPIC community as a tribe of ethnographers working in a particular context with its own language, practices and beliefs regarding the use of ethnographic skills.
    SOC 1127 S01
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
  • Migration in the Americas

    Examines historical trends and determinants of immigration in Latin America to the United States and Europe. Each stage of the migration process is examined: decision to migrate, crossing borders, settlement in destinations, and return. The course integrates theories and empirical studies of international migration with hands-on analysis of survey data from the Mexican Migration Project and the Latin American Migration Project, the two largest survey data bases for studying migration in the Americas. Students will learn how to formulate and operationalize research hypotheses, how to read, process, and analyze survey data files, and how to present and interpret research results.
    SOC 1281 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
  • Macro-Organizational Theory: Organizations in Social Context

    Macro-Organizational Theory focuses on the organization and its social/economic environment. This class will explore various definitions of the organization’s environment, and the many types of macro-level organizational structures in which sets of organizations interact, function, compete, and cooperate. Important questions to be asked include the following:

    -What is an organizational environment and how do organizations “deal” with what is outside of their boundaries?

    -How are the boundaries of organizations defined/recognized/function?

    -How do environments influence organizational strategy and performance?

    -What are the major theories for assessing macro-level organizational phenomena?

    -What are the many ways in which organizations relate to other organizations?
    SOC 1315 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    SOC 1315 C01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C02
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C03
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C04
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C05
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
  • Sociology of Medicine

    The aim of this course is to give conceptual framework and some analytic tools to examine the context of health, illness and well-being at the micro, meso and macro levels. The focus of our attention will be on health inequalities: how they are produced, their relationships with socioeconomic status, and how to minimize their effects. Special attention will be given to the phenomenon of medicalization, to the ways in which a diagnosis is socially constructed, issues of social justice and equity, and the implications of biotechnological innovation and the rise of health and wellness-oriented culture.
    SOC 1550 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Maturo
  • Sophomore Seminar in Sociology of Development

    This seminar provides an introduction to the study of development. It looks at the diversity of understandings of the concept of development as well as its practical importance in the world. Students will read texts that present pressing questions and issues concerning development practices, policies, and theories. Efforts to connect broad theoretical debates to understanding contemporary problems will be encouraged. Enrollment limited to 20 sophomores. WRIT
    SOC 1871D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • Who Governs Markets?

    This Course will introduce students to problems of market regulation. It begins with discussion of key turning points and debates around markets and states that shaped contemporary capitalism. We will then explore a wide array of governance institutions and mechanisms, raging from international organizations, private certification agencies to bottom-up social movements and protection rackets. Students will have an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to exploring one particular industry or company through design of a case study. They cases will help develop our understanding of how policies, labor and social movements or forces of competition influenced particular industries. Enrollment limited to 20.
  • First-Generation College Students: A Sociological Perspective: A Sophomore Seminar

    Colleges have expanded their focus on diversity to include the social class origins of prospective students. One consequence is the emergence of the notion of first-generation college students: those who are the first in their families to attend college. We examine the challenges facing first-gens as they pursue higher education, focusing on two sources of difficulty: gaining admission and acclimating oneself to college, both academically and socially. Our goals are two-fold: (1) To understand the social barriers, compromises, and internal conflicts that first-generation college students face, and, (2) consider how institutional and structural forces impact and shape these students. SOPH DPLL
    SOC 1872G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Sociology of FIRE: Finance, Insurance, + Real Estate

    This seminar explores the sociology of finance, insurance, and real estate (the “FIRE” sector). Topics covered include: the causes and consequences of the growth of finance, the morality of life insurance, gender discrimination, race and the role of the state in the mortgage market, the interplay between innovation and regulation, and the 2008 financial crisis. We will ask whether the benefits of modern finance are worth its costs, and whether finance merely reflects existing social and economic inequalities, or if there are mechanisms by which finance creates or reinforces those inequalities.
    SOC 1872H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
  • Revolutions and Social Change

    Revolutions are some of history’s most dramatic events, causing rapid social transformations to arise from direct human action. But what exactly is a revolution? What causes revolutions? How do revolutions unfold? What do revolutions accomplish? How can revolutions change the world? In this course, you will answer these questions by examining and comparing a wide range of revolutions across history and the world, from France and Russia to Cuba and Iran. You will explore their social and political dynamics, focusing on their causes, courses, and outcomes, and by the course's end will understand the role of revolutions in history.
    SOC 1872I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Wilmot
  • Social Innovation and Disruption: The Case of Modern Turkey

    This course explores life in contemporary Turkey with a focus on change agents. The founders of modern Turkey severed ties from the fading Ottoman Empire through a series of intense and disorienting social reforms. This set a precedent for sudden, sweeping social engineering of a top-down nature. Contemporary Turkish innovators, entrepreneurs and other disruptors are navigating issues of politics, culture and economy in new ways that serve as models for the citizen-centered design of Turkey’s future.
    SOC 1872T S01
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
  • Senior Seminar

    Advanced research seminar for sociology concentrators. Students take each semester in senior year to work on an honors thesis. Participants examine methods for analyzing, writing, and presenting thesis material and apply peer review techniques in assessing each other's work. Culminates in presentation of thesis to the department. Students doing independent study research may also participate with the instructor's permission. Required for "honors" in sociology. WRIT
    SOC 1950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Individual Research Project

    Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Required of intensive concentrators; open to others only by written consent of the Chair of the department. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1970 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S03
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S14
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    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S15
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    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis

    Research seminar for students writing an honors thesis. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1990 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Multivariate Statistical Methods II

    This course is a graduate-level introduction to multivariate regression models for categorical and limited dependent variables. Subject matter includes modeling nominal and ordinal outcomes; truncated distributions; and selection processes. The course also reviews strategies for sample design; handling missing data and weighting in multivariate models. The course employs contemporary statistical software. Special emphasis is placed on model selection and interpretation. Prerequisite: SOC 2010
    SOC 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
  • Contemporary Sociology

    This class offers a review of some of the most interesting contemporary social theorists and the most intense debates in current sociological thought. It thematically reviews the works of Jurgen Habermas on the public sphere, Michel Foucault on disciplinary and governmental modes of power, Bruno Latour on modernity and modern science, Pierre Bourdieu on field and habitus and among others. No prerequisites.
    SOC 2050 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
  • The Souls of Sociology: W.E.B Du Bois and Critical Sociologies of Race

    This course investigates Du Bois’ empirical and theoretical sociological work and its implications for contemporary sociology. W.E.B Du Bois is recognized as a pioneer of sociology of race, but his work is seldom explored. The first part of this course we discuss in-depth Du Bois work to construct the bases for a Du Boisian sociology. The second part we will read contemporary theories of race through the lens of Du Bois’ work. The final section we will read contemporary empirical works in the field of race and ethnicity, reflect how we would conduct them differently from a Du Boisian perspective.
    SOC 2260G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • Welfare States

    This seminar examines the political sociology of welfare states and social policies in the United States and abroad. It reviews major theories accounting for the origins and subsequent development of welfare states, explains the "exceptional" nature of American social policy, and discusses recent welfare reforms via institutional histories and in depth case studies.
    SOC 2300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
  • Sociology Paper Writing Seminar

    This is a special seminar for graduate students in Sociology on the art of writing research papers for publication. The goals of the course are to: 1) learn the process of writing by drafting or redrafting a complete research paper, one section at a time 2) participate in the process of critical peer review 3)become knowledgeable about the process of submission/publication in peer-reviewed journals in Sociology and related social science fields 4) become more familiar with the often hidden processes of journal review , publication ethics, and interpreting/responding to editorial decisions
    SOC 2460 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Teaching Practicum in Sociology

    No description available.
  • Spatial Thinking in Social Science

    This course reviews ways in which social scientists have incorporated concepts about space, place, and distance into their theories and research. Examples are drawn from many substantive areas, including the spatial organization of communities, spatial inequalities, and mobility. Separate laboratory meetings introduce methods of spatial analysis encountered in the course readings, including an introduction to GIS and related mapping tools.
    SOC 2610 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
  • Special Topics in Population

    No description available.
    SOC 2960L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Short
  • Statistical Methods for Hierarchical and Panel Data

    A survey course providing an applied introduction to statistical methods for analyzing clustered and panel data. Topics include multilevel analysis, fixed effects models, and growth models. Our focus will be applied, with an introduction to underlying theory and emphasis on application and interpretation. Overall goals include highlighting the framework and assumptions for each approach; studying applications; understanding disciplinary and theoretical preferences for particular approaches; providing experience with software; and studying issues that arise in empirical research.
    SOC 2960S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
  • Applications in Geographic Information Systems

    This course is for graduate students seeking to develop their GIS skills further and to gain practice applying GIS methods in a research-oriented setting. The course is organized around a set of social science topics—as opposed to sequential coverage of various methods—and the focus is on getting from research question to analytical results to interpretation of findings. The course emphasizes practice matching concept to tool, as well as identifying appropriate tools and combining them successfully. Independent research skills using GIS are developed via the reading of published literature, the guided replication of results, and the interpretation of findings.
    SOC 2961B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
  • Sociology of Power

    The goal of the course is to both engage with the many different and often conflicting theoretical paradigms in sociology that have shaped the debate on power as well as to explore in depth the various empirical manifestations of power. The goal of the course is two-fold: first to familiarize ourselves with the rich set of theoretical tools that sociology provides for exposing, engaging and reconstituting power and second to fully grapple with the challenges of producing social science research that can build on and advance the normative and empirical debate on power. Undergrads by permission of instructor.
    SOC 2961D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SOC 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 2981 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Directed Research Practicum - MSAR Students Only

    The Directed Research Practicum is a one semester course taken in conjunction with an on- or off-campus research internship. The course consists of a directed reading of methodological texts and research articles selected by the student and the faculty director that are directly relevant to the methodological issues/challenges encountered in the internship. The student and faculty director will meet weekly to review the readings. The practicum may include written assignments, literature reviews, and data analysis exercises. Faculty directors need not be involved with the actual internship work, unless the student is working on the faculty member’s research project.
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    SOC 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep