Courses for Spring 2018

  • Perspectives on Social Interaction: An Introduction to Social Psychology

    An introduction to the discipline of sociology examining the individual in social situations. Explores the social development of the person, the development of interpersonal relationships, and the problems of integrating the individual and social system. For each area, the personal and situational factors that bear upon the issue are investigated. The objective is to deepen understanding of the behavior of people in a social context. WRIT
    SOC 0020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Economic Development and Social Change

    Emphasis on understanding the interrelations among economic, political, and cultural aspects of change in developing countries. The experience of currently developing nations is contrasted to that of nations which industrialized in the 19th century. Compares the different development strategies which have been adopted by currently developing nations and their consequences for social change.
    SOC 0150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
  • Contrasting Societies: Democracy, Dictatorship, and Trump

    How do we explain the rise of Trump and what does it represent? Is it a moment of popular legitimation or a challenge to democracy’s development? To what extent is this turn something peculiar to the US? Does this resemble other transformations in the world? How do the last decades’ technological transformations shape conditions both for domination, and resistance, in these times? This sociology seminar depends on your reading course materials and developing their articulations with your own interests. Beyond each week’s preparation, you will be asked to write three 1500 word essays across the term that reflect that engagement. FYS
    SOC 0300T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Theory and Practice of Engaged Scholarship (ESP Seminar)

    Efforts are underway across university and college campuses -- in the United States and globally -- to increase opportunities for engaged learning and research. What is engaged scholarship and how does it challenge (and/or complement) more traditional concepts of scholarship and disciplinary knowledge? What are the ethical, practical, and other challenges associated with community-engaged scholarship? The course will use case studies, field work, team projects, and guest speakers from diverse disciplines and sectors to investigate these and other questions. Enrollment limited to Engaged Scholars Program participants. Limited to 20 students per section.
    SOC 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hance
  • Methods of Social Research

    This course introduces students to the frameworks and methods of conducting sociological research -- from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. The aim is that students develop the skills to ask and answer interesting and important questions about sociological phenomenon. The focus is on designing and executing research, from identifying an interesting question and reviewing the relevant literature, to collecting and analyzing data, to drawing reliable inferences and presenting meaningful results. There is a heavy focus on reading and discussing academic research and working in research teams. By the end of the semester students will complete their own research projects.
    SOC 1020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Context Research for Innovation

    This course brings design thinking into conversation with qualitative research methods, examining the elements of a comprehensive perspective of context. It introduces students to design research methods, ethnographic research methods, and how they work together. Students will learn how to use these methods to identify and engage in "deep hanging out" with the problem, gap or inefficiency in question. They will then move on to patient contextualized opportunity identification for meaningful innovation. By the end of the course, students will have developed a process for effective, through innovation context analysis. Relevant for designers of products, services, organizations , and experience.
    SOC 1118 S01
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
  • Market and Social Surveys

    This course covers the theory and practice of survey research. Topics include questionnaire design and formatting; sample design and selection; interviewing techniques; data base design and data entry; and elementary data analysis and report production. Students individually design and conduct a survey on a topic of their choice, and collectively conduct and analyze a sample survey of the Brown student population.
    SOC 1120 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Macro-Organizational Theory: Organizations in Social Context

    Macro-Organizational Theory focuses on the organization and its social/economic environment. This class will explore various definitions of the organization’s environment, and the many types of macro-level organizational structures in which sets of organizations interact, function, compete, and cooperate. Important questions to be asked include the following:

    -What is an organizational environment and how do organizations “deal” with what is outside of their boundaries?

    -How are the boundaries of organizations defined/recognized/function?

    -How do environments influence organizational strategy and performance?

    -What are the major theories for assessing macro-level organizational phenomena?

    -What are the many ways in which organizations relate to other organizations?
    SOC 1315 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    SOC 1315 C01
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C02
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C04
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1315 C05
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
  • Violence and Society

    The course focuses on the personal and structural sources and consequences of violence in the U.S. We investigate three levels of violence: interpersonal; institutional, wherein social institutions do violence to individuals or groups; and structural, examining the structures of society that tolerate or promote violence, both within the society and toward other societies. Next, we examine the culture of violence that permeates our society, including the mass media and violence. WE focus on specific forms of violence in our society, including gang violence, bullying, violence within schools, sex trafficking, war, religious violence, and terrorism. WRIT
    SOC 1420 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Legacies of Inequality: The U.S. and Beyond

    Does education equalize or widen gaps between people and nations? Has mass imprisonment reduced crime or exacerbated U.S. racial inequality? Does biology determine destiny, or is society more fluid? This course introduces theory and research on social inequality, emphasizing temporal dimensions of social differentiation. Attention will be paid to the characteristics we are given (race, sex), those we achieve (education, income), and institutions and policies we encounter throughout the life cycle (schools, the justice system). By understanding the complexities of social inequality and the challenges of devising solutions, students will leave as informed citizens, better equipped to enter any profession. Enrollment limited to 20. First year students require instructor permission.
    SOC 1871S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
  • Update on American Society: Social Trends in the Last Decade

    American society is always changing, and national data sources (especially the American Community Survey and Current Population Survey) provide updated information on social trends every year. This course will review the most significant recent social trends based on these sources, including such topics as income and wealth inequality, racial and ethnic change, immigration, marriage and family patterns, home ownership, and residential segregation. Enrollment limited to 30 juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
    SOC 1871V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
  • 20th Century World – A Sociology of States and Empires

    This course introduces students to the sociology of empires and states. With help from key theories and concepts it charts a course through the transformation of pre-WWI empires into nation-states and the international order of today. Using primary sources, chosen by the students, we focus on historical continuities and discontinuities that constitute(d) both empires and states and mark the making of the 20th century. Sources may vary from treaties and declarations to literary, film and art works – like Gore Vidal’s Narratives of Empire or Chaplin’s Dictator – that analyze, portray or reproduce state- and empire-making (or unmaking) efforts.
    SOC 1872L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Korhonen
  • Individual Research Project

    Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Required of intensive concentrators; open to others only by written consent of the Chair of the department. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1970 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S03
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis

    Research seminar for students writing an honors thesis. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1990 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Multivariate Statistical Methods II

    This course is a graduate-level introduction to multivariate regression models for categorical and limited dependent variables. Subject matter includes modeling nominal and ordinal outcomes; truncated distributions; and selection processes. The course also reviews strategies for sample design; handling missing data and weighting in multivariate models. The course employs contemporary statistical software. Special emphasis is placed on model selection and interpretation. Prerequisite: SOC 2010
    SOC 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
  • Contemporary Sociology

    This class offers a review of some of the most interesting contemporary social theorists and the most intense debates in current sociological thought. It thematically reviews the works of Jurgen Habermas on the public sphere, Michel Foucault on disciplinary and governmental modes of power, Bruno Latour on modernity and modern science, Pierre Bourdieu on field and habitus and among others. No prerequisites.
    SOC 2050 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
  • Qualitative Methods

    Emphasis on ethnographic field work through participant observation and interviews. Some attention to content analysis and visual sociology. Technical training in developing observational and interview guidelines, data collection, coding, transcript analysis, and computer applications. Strong emphasis on quality writing. Analysis of ethnographic research in book and article format. Attention to recent developments in ethnography, especially reflexivity and autoethnography.
    SOC 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
  • Techniques of Demographic Analysis

    Procedures and techniques for the collection, evaluation, and analysis of demographic data; measures of population composition, fertility, morality, and migration; construction of life tables, population and projections, population dynamics; responsible use of demographic methodology. Mandatory S/NC.
    SOC 2230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    White
  • Event History Analysis

    An introduction to hazard models and their application to event history data in sociology. Topics include survival distributions, standard parametric models, discrete time approaches, partial likelihood models, and the introduction of covariates. Attention is given to practical application and the estimation of these models with software packages, where possible.
    SOC 2240 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
  • Ethnography: Theory and Practice

    This course is designed to introduce graduate students in sociology and related fields to the study and practice of ethnographic methods. The course engages the epistemological issues involved in ethnographic research and introduces the different approaches researchers utilize to resolve these issues. While examining various qualitative methodological approaches, the course will focus on observational and interview-based research. In addition to gaining a theoretical understanding of the method, students will also learn by doing. Students will develop and enhance their skills in ethnographic data collection, analysis and interpretation, and will use these skills in the production of a scholarly paper.
    SOC 2250 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
  • Teaching Practicum in Sociology

    This course is designed for sociology graduate students whose funding has prohibited a teaching assistantship but who need to complete the departmental teaching requirement. The instructor for this course will default as the department chair but it is the graduate student's responsibility to identify an instructor to work alongside. This partnership must be approved by the director of graduate study.
    SOC 2510 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
  • Comparative Historical Analysis

    The seminar focuses on the application of theory and method in historical sociology. It will combine the reading of exemplary works, both classical and current, in comparative-historical sociology, with an exploration of historical methods that involves methodological readings but focuses on students' use of archives in their own individual research. For graduate students only.
    SOC 2600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
  • Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis for the Social Sciences

    This course is intended for graduate students seeking to learn the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and how to incorporate spatial questions into social science research. The course is primarily a methods course and through required independent project work, students will learn how GIS and spatial analysis are typically employed across the social sciences. By the end students will be proficient in independent use of ArcGIS, most frequently used GIS software package, and will be able to apply the more common tools of spatial analysis. They will also know basics of cartography.
    SOC 2612 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
  • Comparative Political Sociology

    This course explores both classic and contemporary debates in political sociology. The central thematic is the relationship between democracy and power and includes theories of the state, markets, social class and civil society. The debates are explored through historical and comparative lenses, covering both old and new democracies. Some background in political or sociological theory is recommended.
    SOC 2960K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Economic Sociology

    This course provides an overview of the subfield of economic sociology. Economic sociologists examine economic life at all levels of analysis, including individuals, organizations, markets, fields, institutions, and states. Economic sociologists approach the study of economic life using diverse theoretical approaches, from cultural analysis to structural networks. In the first half the term, we will survey the major approaches to economic sociology. In the second half, we will cover specific debates and read exemplars of recent work.
    SOC 2960T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SOC 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 2981 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Directed Research Practicum - MSAR Students Only

    The Directed Research Practicum is a one semester course taken in conjunction with an on- or off-campus research internship. The course consists of a directed reading of methodological texts and research articles selected by the student and the faculty director that are directly relevant to the methodological issues/challenges encountered in the internship. The student and faculty director will meet weekly to review the readings. The practicum may include written assignments, literature reviews, and data analysis exercises. Faculty directors need not be involved with the actual internship work, unless the student is working on the faculty member’s research project.
    SOC 2982 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    SOC 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Sociology

    The following related courses, offered in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in Sociology. Please see the course listing of the sponsoring department for location and time.

    American Studies
    AMST 1700L Bad Rehab: Rehabilitation Regimes of the American Ethic
    Development Studies
    DEVL 2000 Theory and Research in Development I
    Educational Studies
    EDUC 1040 Sociology of Education
    Environmental Studies
    ENVS 0495 Introduction to Environmental Social Science
    ENVS 0705 Equity and the Environment: Movements, Scholarship, Solutions
    Urban Studies
    URBN 1000 Fieldwork in the Urban Community
    SOC XLIST 0