Courses for Spring 2021

  • Social Forces: An Introduction to Sociology

    Social forces constrain and empower us, bond us together and push us apart. Sociology explores the workings of societies large and small: nations, organizations, communities, families, and other groups. How do societies shape action and identity, and why are social pressures so hard to defy? How do societies distribute wealth and power, and why do inequalities so often coalesce around race, ethnicity, class, and gender? How do established practices persist, and when do movements arise to challenge them? Examining such themes across a range of issues and topics, this course provides a springboard for future study throughout the social sciences.
    SOC 0010 S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction. 19 students will rotate in-person every week. The course meets synchronously whether students are in-person or remote.
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
  • Race, Immigration, and the Making of Inequality

    In what ways has the interpretation of race and immigration shaped the current system of stratification in American society? This course focuses on answering this question from a historical and contemporary perspective.  Using a sociological approach, we analyze the meaning of ethno-racial formation and categorization and survey the different processes that contribute to ethno-racial inequality. Engaging empirical research, we pay special attention to how individuals and groups interpret and experience the institutional arrangements that perpetuate exclusion and disadvantage by race and immigration status. The course aims to provide the analytical tools required to understand race relations in everyday life.
    SOC 0030 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
  • Sex, Gender, and Society

    An introduction to the sociological study of sex and gender. More specifically, this course explores how sexuality is perceived, defined, and experienced in the context of society. How sexuality influences our lives, is reflected in social norms, attitudes and beliefs, through public and private policies and practices, and the social institutions is also investigated. This class also focuses on how prevalent gender differences really are in our society and examines the social construction of gender.
    SOC 0230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Organizations and Society

    We live in a society of organizations. We are born inside organizations, we are educated inside organizations, we work inside organizations, and when we die, we will be buried by organizations. Organizations are therefore central to processes that shape individual lives and societal trends, from widening income inequality, to the spread of innovations, to struggles over public policy. This course introduces the field of Organizational Studies, examining organizations as complex, multifaceted social settings. By investigating how organizations and society shape each other, students will build skills for informed, socially-responsible engagement in an increasingly organizational society.
    SOC 0300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Wetts
    SOC 0300 C01
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 0300 C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 0300 C03
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 0300 C04
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 0300 C05
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 0300 C06
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Inequalities and Health

    We start from the assumption that the social organization of society shapes definitions and experiences of health and illness, the distribution of diseases, and the responses to them. We explore the relevance of social structure and social interaction to health and well-being, emphasizing socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, and social contexts such as relationships, families, schools, and neighborhoods. This is not a "sociology of medicine" course. It will not emphasize the profession of medicine, health care policy, or health care organizations. Enrollment limited to 19 first year students. Instructor permission required.
    SOC 0300K S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction.
    Primary Instructor
    Short
  • Social Inequality: Change and Continuity in the U.S.

    Although we like to believe the U.S. is the land of opportunity, it has lower equality of opportunity than most developed countries. What does inequality of opportunity in the U.S. look like and how has it changed or remained stable over the last several decades? We will examine theories, characteristics, and trends of socioeconomic inequality in the U.S., focusing on how this inequality shapes children’s life chances. In the process, this course will help us think about what an ideal level of equality of opportunity might look like and social changes that could help us achieve it.
    SOC 0300N S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction.
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
  • Theory and Practice of Engaged Scholarship

    Efforts are underway across university and college campuses -- in the United States and globally -- to increase opportunities for engaged learning and research. What is engaged scholarship and how does it challenge (and/or complement) more traditional concepts of scholarship and disciplinary knowledge? What are the ethical, practical, and other challenges associated with community-engaged scholarship? The course will use case studies, field work, team projects, and guest speakers from diverse disciplines and sectors to investigate these and other questions. Limited to 40 students per section.
    SOC 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hernandez
  • Methods of Social Research

    This course introduces students to the frameworks and methods of conducting sociological research -- from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. The aim is that students develop the skills to ask and answer interesting and important questions about sociological phenomenon. The focus is on designing and executing research, from identifying an interesting question and reviewing the relevant literature, to collecting and analyzing data, to drawing reliable inferences and presenting meaningful results. There is a heavy focus on reading and discussing academic research and working in research teams. By the end of the semester students will complete their own research projects.
    SOC 1020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Leadership in Organizations

    What is leadership? What makes a great leader? Can leadership be learned? Improved? This course explores various theoretical approaches to leadership using a combination of lectures and case-study analysis. Additionally, it aims at developing your personal leadership skills by using self-exploration and reflection, self-assessment instruments, role-play, and feedback from peers.
    SOC 1060 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ozkazanc-Pan
  • Introductory Statistics for Social Research

    Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: measures of central tendencies and variability, sampling, tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Also includes the use of computers in data analysis. Knowledge of elementary algebra is assumed. Enrollment is limited to 144 students.
    SOC 1100 S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction. Lectures will be given with up to 19 students present in the room, and will be recorded for other students to view online. Students may enroll online or in-person section meetings.
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    SOC 1100 C01
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 1100 C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 1100 C03
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 1100 C04
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
    SOC 1100 C05
    Schedule Code
    C: Discussion Section/Conference
  • Context Research for Innovation

    This course brings design thinking into conversation with qualitative research methods, examining the elements of a comprehensive perspective of context. It introduces students to design research methods, ethnographic research methods, and how they work together. Students will learn how to use these methods to identify and engage in "deep hanging out" with the problem, gap or inefficiency in question. They will then move on to patient contextualized opportunity identification for meaningful innovation. By the end of the course, students will have developed a process for effective, through innovation context analysis. Relevant for designers of products, services, organizations , and experience.
    SOC 1118 S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction. Monday lecture will be held online for all registered students. Wednesdays and Fridays will be discussion days. Wednesdays will be an online lecture for half of the class and Fridays will be an in-person lecture for the other half. The groups will rotate every week on Wednesdays and Fridays. Instructor will consult with the class as needed.
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
  • Remaking the City

    Cities are being reshaped by immigration, economic restructuring, and other forces. This course reviews these changes from several perspectives, including the patterns and causes of change, the role of politics and public policy, and how different groups of people (by class, race, and national origin) manage under the new conditions. Readings will emphasize historical and cross-national comparisons.
    SOC 1330 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
  • Technology and Development

    A “smart” global order is currently being created, where information and communication technologies dominate public arenas and private lives. Much of the debates on new technologies have focused on the global North, yet the impact on the global South is equally significant. In this course, we will explore the history, present and possible futures of the use of technologies for transforming economic, social and political lives. The technologies discussed will range from the steam power leading to the first industrial revolution to today’s mobile phone technologies, workforce automation, as well as facial-recognition and other surveillance technologies.
    SOC 1460 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
  • Power, Knowledge and Justice in Global Social Change

    How bad is climate change, and how much worse it will get? How are global inequalities’ changing? What are their consequences? How is white supremacy implicated here? What is our responsibility in analyzing/engaging these questions? You have at least an implicit response to these questions and others addressing global transformations. This course will help refine your understandings by inviting you to consider the actors, structures, norms and powers shaping how change works and why we judge its expressions as we do. Across some 20 areas of global change, we compare conceptions of power and justice in their various articulations.
    SOC 1490 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Alternatives to Violence

    We examine nonviolence as a method for resolving serious social conflict. We consider psychological and sociological approaches to understanding why people choose violence, as a precursor to studying theories of nonviolence. We investigate practioners of nonviolence throughout history and analyze nonviolence as a response to such issues as the death penalty, war, and terrorism.
    SOC 1870E S01
    If enrollments exceeds 19, the course will be 100% remote.
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Demographics and Development

    Assesses the social and economic determinants and consequences of changes in fertility, mortality, and migration and their impact on the size, distribution, and composition of population in developing societies. Implications of the evolving population structure for planning and policy. Enrollment limited to 20.
    SOC 1870K S01
    Primary Instructor
    White
  • Sociology of Health Inequality in Global Perspective

    Arguably no resource is more important for social life than health. Health, however, is unequally distributed both within and across populations. This course critically investigates the determinants of health inequality, examining evidence from across the globe. It draws together key readings from the stratification literature, the sociology of development, and public health to consider how health is structured in High and Low and Middle Income countries.
    SOC 1872S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pheiffer
  • Feminist Perspectives in Criminal Justice

    This course examines the intersection of gender and the criminal justice system in the U.S. It is designed to explore theoretical and empirical research that relates to gender and criminal justice involvement. We will also examine policy implications of these issues, paying particular attention to how multiple statuses of individuals (gender, race/ethnicity, social class, sexuality, and so forth) affect social and institutional responses.
    SOC 1873F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Umeh
  • Research Ethics

    Is covert research inherently unethical? Is it okay to inflict harm upon research participants for the sake of scientific learning? Is it unethical to misrepresent or lie to research participants? What happens to research participants after the research is over? What happens to the research findings? And who is regulating these things? In this course, we will explore case studies that underscore the importance of ethical research. We will examine the evolution and efficacy of internal research boards. We will study the development of posthumanism and relational ethics to understand evolving thought on the treatment of humans and non-human animals in research. Finally, students will develop their own research ethics framework based on their understanding of material presented in the course.
    SOC 1873R S01
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
  • Senior Seminar

    Advanced seminar for sociology and social analysis and research (SAR) concentrators. Participants examine methods for analyzing, writing, and presenting capstone and thesis material and apply peer review techniques in assessing each other's work. Culminates in presentation of capstone or thesis to the department. Required for all sociology and social analysis and research (SAR) concentrators.
    SOC 1950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gonzalez Van Cleve
  • Individual Research Project

    Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Required of intensive concentrators; open to others only by written consent of the Chair of the department. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Gonzalez Van Cleve
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Ozkazanc-Pan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Wetts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shih
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis

    Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Gonzalez Van Cleve
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Wetts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Multivariate Statistical Methods II

    This course is a graduate-level introduction to multivariate regression models for categorical and limited dependent variables. Subject matter includes modeling nominal and ordinal outcomes; truncated distributions; and selection processes. The course also reviews strategies for sample design; handling missing data and weighting in multivariate models. The course employs contemporary statistical software. Special emphasis is placed on model selection and interpretation. Prerequisite: SOC 2010
    SOC 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
  • Contemporary Sociology

    This class offers a review of some of the most interesting contemporary social theorists and the most intense debates in current sociological thought. It thematically reviews the works of Jurgen Habermas on the public sphere, Michel Foucault on disciplinary and governmental modes of power, Bruno Latour on modernity and modern science, Pierre Bourdieu on field and habitus and among others. No prerequisites.
    SOC 2050 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
  • Qualitative Methods

    Emphasis on ethnographic field work through participant observation and interviews. Some attention to content analysis and visual sociology. Technical training in developing observational and interview guidelines, data collection, coding, transcript analysis, and computer applications. Strong emphasis on quality writing. Analysis of ethnographic research in book and article format. Attention to recent developments in ethnography, especially reflexivity and autoethnography.
    SOC 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gonzalez Van Cleve
  • Techniques of Demographic Analysis

    Procedures and techniques for the collection, evaluation, and analysis of demographic data; measures of population composition, fertility, morality, and migration; construction of life tables, population and projections, population dynamics; responsible use of demographic methodology.
    SOC 2230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
  • Sociology of Discrimination

    In recent decades, open expressions of prejudice and discrimination have become less socially acceptable. Inequalities along lines of race, class, and gender, however, persist. We will examine the social scientific literature on discrimination in its interpersonal and structural forms. We will also discuss what is not discrimination given that this term is often used (incorrectly) synonymously with disparities to refer to inequalities that originate through other processes. We will investigate causes, definitions, measurement, effects, and possible policy responses to discrimination. This course will draw on both qualitative and quantitative approaches to the study of discrimination.
    SOC 2260B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
  • The Souls of Sociology: W.E.B Du Bois and Critical Sociologies of Race

    This course investigates Du Bois’ empirical and theoretical sociological work and its implications for contemporary sociology. W.E.B Du Bois is recognized as a pioneer of sociology of race, but his work is seldom explored. The first part of this course we discuss in-depth Du Bois work to construct the bases for a Du Boisian sociology. The second part we will read contemporary theories of race through the lens of Du Bois’ work. The final section we will read contemporary empirical works in the field of race and ethnicity, reflect how we would conduct them differently from a Du Boisian perspective.
    SOC 2260G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
  • Master's Thesis and Proposal Writing Seminar

    Sociology 2420 is a graduate seminar on the craft of social-science writing. Writing is not easy for most of us, and it can sometimes be frustrating. Through out-of-class writing and recurrent in-class review the course explores strategies for making your writing more effective, more productive, and hopefully more enjoyable. The seminar’s goal is to help graduate students to advance and complete their writing tasks, whatever they are working on. It is open to students working on a variety of goals such as writing their MA, their dissertation proposal, a research proposal, or a journal article.
    SOC 2420 S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction. Course will meet in person with those who are unable to participate joining us remotely. In case of high enrollment, students will break into 2 groups and attend class in person on alternate class days.
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
  • Sociology Paper Writing Seminar

    This is a special seminar for graduate students in Sociology on the art of writing research papers for publication. The goals of the course are to: 1) learn the process of writing by drafting or redrafting a complete research paper, one section at a time 2) participate in the process of critical peer review 3)become knowledgeable about the process of submission/publication in peer-reviewed journals in Sociology and related social science fields 4) become more familiar with the often hidden processes of journal review , publication ethics, and interpreting/responding to editorial decisions
    SOC 2460 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
  • Teaching Practicum in Sociology

    This course is designed for sociology graduate students whose funding has prohibited a teaching assistantship but who need to complete the departmental teaching requirement. The instructor for this course will default as the department chair but it is the graduate student's responsibility to identify an instructor to work alongside. This partnership must be approved by the director of graduate study.
    SOC 2510 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Blume
  • Spatial Data Analysis Techniques in the Social Sciences

    Survey course of statistical methods that can be used to analyze spatial and/or clustered data at the individual and aggregate levels. Topics include multilevel analysis; fixed effects approaches; spatial choice; spatial autocorrelation, heterogeneity and dependence. Application with real data. Not a course about Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or mapping techniques.
    SOC 2960G S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction.
    Primary Instructor
    Candipan
  • Sociology of Organizations Graduate Seminar

    The sociology of organizations offers a burgeoning and vibrant literature, with relevance not only for self-identified organizational sociologists, but also for scholars in fields as diverse as politics, development, industrial relations, finance, education, health care, and the arts. This seminar offers an intensive exploration of the "state of play" in contemporary macro-organizational theory. Shared and individual readings, coupled with weekly discussions and email dialogues, allow students to refine and extend their thinking on a series of important and controversial topics in the recent literature. Although this course has no formal prerequisites, the syllabus is aimed primarily at graduate students who enjoy some prior familiarity with organizational theory, whether in sociology or a kindred discipline. Enrollment limited to 15.
    SOC 2960M S01
    This course will be taught in seminar format. We will meet in person, if feasible. However, if enrollment exceeds the socially-distanced room capacity, or if a sufficient number of students require or prefer remote instruction, we will meet virtually via Zoom.
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Applications in Geographic Information Systems

    This course is for graduate students seeking to develop their GIS skills further and to gain practice applying GIS methods in a research-oriented setting. The course is organized around a set of social science topics—as opposed to sequential coverage of various methods—and the focus is on getting from research question to analytical results to interpretation of findings. The course emphasizes practice matching concept to tool, as well as identifying appropriate tools and combining them successfully. Independent research skills using GIS are developed via the reading of published literature, the guided replication of results, and the interpretation of findings.
    SOC 2961B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mwenda
  • Sociology of Power

    The goal of the course is to both engage with the many different and often conflicting theoretical paradigms in sociology that have shaped the debate on power as well as to explore in depth the various empirical manifestations of power. The goal of the course is two-fold: first to familiarize ourselves with the rich set of theoretical tools that sociology provides for exposing, engaging and reconstituting power and second to fully grapple with the challenges of producing social science research that can build on and advance the normative and empirical debate on power. Undergrads by permission of instructor.
    SOC 2961D S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction. 7 students will rotate in-person every week.
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
  • Computational Methods for Social Scientists

    This course will teach students the fundamentals of computational methods for social science research, with an emphasis on techniques for analyzing large-scale textual data. The first part of the course will provide students with basic technical skills necessary to conduct computational research, including introducing them to Python programming and web-scraping. The second part of the course will focus on automated text analysis, highlighting key methods appropriate for inductive or deductive inquiry, such as topic modeling and dictionary-based methods. The course assumes no previous knowledge of programming and is most appropriate for graduate students in the social sciences or humanities.
    SOC 2961M S01
    This course will be hybrid with a combination of online and in-person instruction. 7 students will rotate in-person every week.
    Primary Instructor
    Wetts
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SOC 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 2981 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gonzalez Van Cleve
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Ozkazanc-Pan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Rauscher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hirschman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Wetts
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Lopez Sanders
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Qian
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2981 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Directed Research Practicum - MSAR Students Only

    The Directed Research Practicum is a one semester course taken in conjunction with an on- or off-campus research internship. The course consists of a directed reading of methodological texts and research articles selected by the student and the faculty director that are directly relevant to the methodological issues/challenges encountered in the internship. The student and faculty director will meet weekly to review the readings. The practicum may include written assignments, literature reviews, and data analysis exercises. Faculty directors need not be involved with the actual internship work, unless the student is working on the faculty member’s research project.
    SOC 2982 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Dissertation Preparation

    For Sociology PhD graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    SOC 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Graduate Thesis Prep