Ever since high school, Daniel Traver knew he wanted to study engineering in college to learn how to tackle the global climate crisis.

“The worst outcomes of a warming planet will disproportionately affect historically and currently marginalized communities,” Daniel says. “This idea motivates me, and gives me the urgency to keep working towards solutions and strategies to deal with this crisis.”

At Brown, Daniel is gaining valuable knowledge in the classroom about social justice and sustainability and also taking advantage of opportunities to the test what he’s learned in the real world. He serves on Brown’s Climate Action League, interns on Brown’s Scope 3 Emissions Committee in the Office of Sustainability and does research in the Climate and Development Lab on a greenhouse gas reduction study for the state of Rhode Island. This summer, he will intern with a Rhode Island engineering firm that specializes in energy efficiency for buildings and manufacturing processes.

“The environmental engineering concentration has allowed me to develop a robust problem-solving mindset with the technical background necessary to engage with complex problems surrounding clean energy, building efficiency and other technical issues involving climate change,” says Daniel. “But studying on College Hill has also given me many chances to apply myself outside the classroom and collaborate with amazing students, faculty and staff on worthwhile projects I believe in. I’m so happy to be a part of a community that values both academics and extracurriculars.”

At Brown, he has learned to find balance in his life and make time for a variety of activities. When he isn’t working on sustainability, you’ll find him playing club sports or singing with the Brown Derbies a cappella group.

“I’ve found it important to be both a part of organizations that do work that I believe in and a part of groups with people I love to be around,” says Daniel. “I use many of my non-academic activities as a relaxing break from coursework. Rehearsal with the Derbies are always rejuvenating and give me a needed rest from academics and work.”

Daniel already knows for certain that he’ll keep exploring the intersection between science and policy after Brown, using both for the public good.

“Whatever I do, I intend to work towards technical, social and political solutions for a just and equitable transition to a sustainable energy sector and economy,” Daniel says. “I want to be a part of this ambitious, but necessary effort to decarbonize our society and do so in a way that benefits all communities.”