Courses for Spring 2018

  • Fieldwork in the Urban Community

    Each student undertakes a fieldwork project in close collaboration with a government agency, a nonprofit association, or a planning firm, thereby simultaneously engaging with community and learning qualitative research methods skills. In weekly seminar meetings, the class examines a series of urban issues and discusses fieldwork methodology. Students also schedule regular appointments with the instructor. WRIT DPLL
    URBN 1000 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
  • The United States Metropolis, 1945-2000

    This lecture and discussion course will provide students with an introduction to the history, politics, and culture of United States cities and suburbs from the end of World War II to the close of the twentieth century. Readings are drawn from recent work in the political, social, and cultural history of U.S. cities as well as primary sources rooted in the period under study. DPLL WRIT
    URBN 1200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zipp
  • Planning Sustainable Cities

    What does sustainability mean in the context of urban areas? Can sustainability be achieved in cities? If so, in what contexts and how? In this course, we will explore theoretical elements of sustainable development and their applications to urban planning. We will also explore various practices in important subfields of planning -- land use, transportation, brownfields redevelopment, affordable housing, renewable energy, food systems, economic development, and governance. This is a project-based course and includes lectures, discussions, workshops, case studies, selected guest speakers, a final project and a mandatory field trip. The approach is interdisciplinary and open to non-concentrators.
    URBN 1220 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sungu-Eryilmaz
  • The Politics of Community Organizing

    Introduces key issues concerning community organizing. Focuses on the life, skills, and tactics of Saul Alinsky and the national organization he founded, the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF). Analyzes the work of the IAF in a number of urban settings. Seeks to develop theories and models for studying community mobilization in urban America. Priority given to Political Science and Urban Studies concentrators. DPLL WRIT
    URBN 1870J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Orr
  • The Cultural and Social Life of the Built Environment

    This seminar investigates the relationship between people and place. It considers the ways that people create and experience the human-made landscape, how they understand place through various aesthetic forms, and political conflict over space and place. We look mostly at the history and contemporary development of cities and suburbs in the United States. Students will prepare a final project on a specific aspect of the built environment; they will be encouraged to focus their research on Providence or another local community. Enrollment limited to 20. Priority given to Urban Studies concentrators and seniors; instructor permission required otherwise. WRIT
    URBN 1870N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zipp
  • The City, the River, and the Sea: Social and Environmental Change at the Water's Edge

    This course examines urban social and environmental change at the water’s edge, focusing in particular on urban rivers, coastal areas, and deltas. Beginning with key frameworks for understanding the relationship between people and place, students explore the history and current concerns of urbanization, within the larger and increasingly urgent inquiry on human dwelling and water/waterways. The course is then organized around key topics and case studies from around the world, framed by historical and scientific data but also explored through ethnography, narrative non-fiction, and documentary work to understand how water, urban dwelling, and change are variously experienced, enacted, and presented. WRIT
    URBN 1870S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
  • Transportation: An Urban Planning Perspective

    This seminar explores how urban planners in the U.S. plan for and around various transportation networks. We will examine how these networks are designed and funded, which modes get priority over others, and ultimately how transportation shapes the built environment. Realworld examples of plans and projects from Providence and Rhode Island are used throughout the course. Important concepts are illustrated through field trips and guest speakers. WRIT
    URBN 1870T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Azar
  • Independent Reading and Research

    A specific program of intensive reading and research arranged in terms of the special needs and interests of the student. Open primarily to concentrators, but others may be admitted by written permission. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    URBN 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Morone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Neumann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Orr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Zipp
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Wong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis II in Urban Studies

    A program of intensive reading, research, and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Thesis Advisor in Urban Studies. Mandatory attendance at periodic meetings during the semester is required. Open to Senior Urban Studies concentrators pursuing Honors in Urban Studies. Instructor permission required.
    URBN 1972 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Morone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Neumann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Orr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Sungu-Eryilmaz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Wong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1972 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Zipp
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Courses of Interest to Concentrators in Urban Studies

    The following courses offered by other departments will fulfill Core Discipline, Seminar, and Complementary Course requirements of the Urban Studies concentration. (Please refer to the Urban Studies website to determine which requirements are fulfilled by these courses.)

    Please check with the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    Anthropology
    ANTH 0820 Youth, Art, and the Promised City: Recreating the Green Book
    ANTH 1301 Anthropology of Homelessness
    Applied Mathematics
    APMA 0650 Essential Statistics
    APMA 1650 Statistical Inference I
    APMA 1660 Statistical Inference II
    Archaeology and the Ancient World
    ARCH 1720 How Houses Build People
    Cognitive, Linguistic, Psychological Sciences
    CLPS 0900 Quantitative Methods in Psychology
    Economics
    ECON 1620 Introduction to Econometrics
    Education
    EDUC 1110 Introductory Statistics for Education Research and Policy Analysis
    EDUC 1720 Urban Schools in Historical Perspective
    English
    ENGL 0100N City Novels
    ENGL 1710I Harlem Renaissance
    Environmental Studies
    ENVS 1555 Urban Agriculture: The Importance of Localized Food Systems
    ENVS 1580 Environmental Stewardship
    History of Art and Architecture
    HIAA 0560 Popes & Pilgrims in Renaissance Rome
    Medieval Studies
    MDVL 0360 Cities: Medieval Perspectives
    Political Science
    POLS 1310 African American Politics
    POLS 1600 Political Research Methods
    Public Policy
    PLCY 1200 Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation
    Sociology
    SOC 1020 Methods of Social Research
    SOC 1100 Introductory Statistics for Social Research
    URBN XLIST 0