Courses for Fall 2016

  • The City: An Introduction to Urban Studies

    This introductory course to Urban Studies is taught in an entirely new format. Led by Prof. Neumann, it will include lectures by Urban Studies faculty who will present their views of the field. It offers an interdisciplinary approach to the history, physical design, spatial form, economy, government, cultures, and social life of cities worldwide. Which are the most urgent issues facing cities today? How will continued urban growth affect the environment? How can we learn from historic approaches to urban planning? Which are the most promising solutions to relieve urban inequality? What can be learned from ‘informal housing’ developments? DPLL LILE WRIT
    URBN 0210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Neumann
  • Fieldwork in the Urban Community

    Each student undertakes a fieldwork project in close collaboration with a government agency, a nonprofit association, or a planning firm, thereby simultaneously engaging with community and learning qualitative research methods skills. In weekly seminar meetings, the class examines a series of urban issues and discusses fieldwork methodology. Students also schedule regular appointments with the instructor. WRIT DPLL
    URBN 1000 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
  • Planning Sustainable Cities

    What does sustainability mean in the context of degraded urban areas? Can sustainable development be achieved in cities? This course offers a comprehensive, yet critical understanding of the competing theories and practices of sustainable development as applied to cities. Topics include sprawl, energy-efficient transportation, brownfields, community land trusts, green architecture, renewable energy, air and water pollution, and waste recycling.
    URBN 1220 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sungu-Eryilmaz
  • Crime and the City

    This course focuses on crime and the making of urban space, as well as how the making of urban space helps to create and categorize criminal subjects and the concept of cultural criminality. In addition to looking at the geography of race, class, and power in a contemporary US setting, this semester we will focus in on gang identity and performance, police tactics and territoriality, graffiti as an act of spatial transgression, homelessness, and notions of socio-spatial justice. As I will show with the course texts and through classroom lectures, studying crime is about studying space, and visa versa. DPLL LILE
    URBN 1230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bloch
  • Downtown Development

    This seminar examines the development and revitalization of the urban core in the United States with a focus on urban planning. Providence is used as a laboratory to explore development from the perspective of the planner, the developer, and city residents. Important concepts are illustrated through field trips, public meetings, and guest speakers. WRIT
    URBN 1870D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Azar
  • Housing and Homelessness

    What is homelessness and where does it come from? Can affordable housing solve the problem? This seminar examines homelessness, low-income housing policies, segregation, gentrification, privatization of public space, and related processes that make it difficult to house the poor. Open to Urban Studies concentrators and by permission based on demonstration of research skills. Enrollment limited to 20.
    URBN 1870F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
  • Cities in Mind: Modern Urban Thought and Theory

    This seminar investigates the place of the city in the history of modern thought and cultural theory, drawing on selected currents in urban thought and theory from Europe and the United States over the last two centuries. Topics include questions of public and private space, citizenship, selfhood, difference and inequality, media and technology, planning, modernism and postmodernism. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors concentrating in Urban Studies. LILE WRIT
    URBN 1870Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zipp
  • Theory of Architecture and Urbanism

    The course introduces the theory of architecture and urbanism. It focuses on the notion that theory is closely related to the crisis of architecture and urbanism as experienced with the rise of the modern metropolis in the mid-19th century. The formation of mass society, the deployment of new materials such as steel, glass and concrete, and the replacement of manual labour by machine production scrutinized the classical concepts of space, architecture and city. The course will follow the changing concept of theory from the advent of the modern metropolis through high modernism, postmodernity, deconstruction and the age of digital production.
    URBN 1921 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gleiter
  • Independent Reading and Research

    A specific program of intensive reading and research arranged in terms of the special needs and interests of the student. Open primarily to concentrators, but others may be admitted by written permission. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    URBN 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bloch
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Morone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Neumann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Orr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Zipp
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Wong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis I in Urban Studies

    A program of intensive reading, research, and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Thesis Advisor in Urban Studies. Mandatory attendance at periodic meetings during the semester is required. Open to Senior Urban Studies concentrators pursuing Honors in Urban Studies. Instructor permission required.
    URBN 1971 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Morone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Neumann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Orr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Sungu-Eryilmaz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Wong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    URBN 1971 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Zipp
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Courses of Interest to Concentrators in Urban Studies

    The following courses offered by other departments will fulfill Core Discipline and Seminar Course requirements of the Urban Studies concentration. (Please refer to the Urban Studies website to determine which requirements are fulfilled by these courses.)

    Please check with the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    Applied Mathematics
    APMA 1650 Statistical Inference I
    Archaeology and Ancient World
    ARCH 1900 The Archaeology of College Hill
    Cognitive, Linguistic, Psych Sciences
    CLPS 0900 Quantitative Methods in Psychology
    Economics
    ECON 1620 Introduction to Econometrics
    Education
    EDUC 1430 Psychology of Race, Class, and Gender
    EDUC 1650 Policy Implementation in Education
    English
    ENGL 0700R Modernist Cities
    Environmental Studies
    ENVS 1400 Sustainable Design in the Built Environment
    Geological Sciences
    GEOL 1320 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Environmental Applications
    History of Art and Architecture
    HIAA 0770 Architecture and Urbanism of the African Diaspora
    History
    HIST 1140 Samurai and Merchants, Prostitutes and Priests: Japanese Urban Culture in the Early Modern Period
    HIST 1550 American Urban History to 1870
    HIST 1965A City as Modernity: Popular Culture, Mass Consumption, Urban Entertainment in Nineteenth-Century Paris
    HIST 1979L Urban History of Latin America
    Political Science
    POLS 1760 Infrastructure Policy
    Public Policy
    PLCY 1910 Social Entrepreneurship
    Sociology
    SOC 1100 Introductory Statistics for Social Research
    SOC 1270 Race, Class, and Ethnicity in the Modern World
    SOC 1340 Principles and Methods of Geographic Information Systems
    SOC 1640 Social Exclusion
    URBN XLIST 0