David Winton Bell Gallery

Past Exhibitions

KNOT: An installation by Annabel Daou
January 23, 2009 - March 8, 2009

The Bell Gallery presents a solo-exhibition of Annabel Daou, a Lebanese-born and New York-based artist. Entitled KNOT, the three-part exhibition consists of twelve notebooks with a continuously drawn line that are laid out on a table much like a map; a site-specific wall drawing that transcribes the lines of the notebooks into the gallery space; and a twelve-fold accordian brochure that charts the notebook drawings into a single line. The title KNOT alludes to an inherent reversibility between the text and image, reading and seeing, reflection and experience, creation and interpretation.The project is a collaboration between the artist and the writer David Markus, in which twelve words chosen by Markus — aporia sacrifice muse island place game object trauma donimation distance that — serve as guidelines for Daou's visual exploration of linguistic meaning.

Curated by Vesela Sretenovic
image: detail of wall drawing

Location Gallery
Warhol's People
January 23, 2009 - March 8, 2009

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Dorothy Hamill

Location Lobby
The Sizes of Things in the Mind's Eye: Elizabeth King
November 8, 2008 - December 21, 2008

The Sizes of Things in the Mind's Eye is a mid-career survey of the work of sculptor Elizabeth King. King makes meticulously crafted objects that raise questions about life and artifice, and the nature of being. Her uncanny self-portraits, articulated arms, artificial eyes, and tissue samples are created in a range of natural materials: from porcelain, wood, bronze, and basalt to kidskin, and human hair and eye lashes. The exhibition includes 65 sculptures, film animations, installation pieces, drawings, and photographs produced since the late 1970s. Elizabeth King: The Sizes of Things in the Mind's Eye was organized by the Visual Arts Center of Richmond, Virginia.

image: Pupil, 1987-90

Location Gallery
September 6, 2008 - October 19, 2008

Seventeen years after the end of the Soviet Union, Views and Re-Views invites a post-Cold War assessment of Soviet graphic arts. The exhibition suggests that artistic merit may be found in art in the service of political belief and subject to state regulation and that there is a range of stylistic diversity within work that is too often simply (and dismissively) characterized as Socialist Realism. Viewers may also note that with the passage of time it has become possible to see that not all criticisms of the West by Soviet artists are completely spurious or inauthentic. Views and Re-Views includes posters, cartoons, photomontages, and postcards spanning more than six decades, from the time of the Russian Civil War (1918–21) into the late Soviet period. The exhibition includes well-known Soviet graphic works, by such artists as Viktor Deni, Dmitri Moor, El Lissitsky, and Gustav Klutsis, as well as lesser-known, but equally compelling works by the Kukryniksy (a three-artist collaborative), Alexander Zhitomirsky, and others. Drawn from an extensive private collection of Soviet propaganda, the exhibition includes more than 160 images.

Co-curated by Abbott Gleason and Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Alexander Zhitomirsky, Hysterical War Drummer, 1948

Location Gallery and Lobby, John Hay Library, Cogut Center for the Humanities, and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library
Self and Others: Jesse Burke, Amy Lovera, Annu Palajunnatha Matthew, Linn Underhill, Sage Sohier, Millee Tibbs
June 7, 2008 - July 8, 2008

The artists included in Self and Others explore their identity in relationship to others, i.e. family, friends, or society.  Burke and Sage approach the self through family; Matthew focuses on ethnicity; Underhill and Burke examine gender; Tibbs compares her child and adult selves; and Lovera posits a fictionalized self as girl-adventurer, à la Pippi Longstocking.

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Jesse Burke, from Masculinity, 2005-2007

Location Gallery
Walid Raad: We can make it rain but no one came to ask
April 10, 2008 - May 25, 2008

We Can Make Rain But No One Came to Ask is a project by Walid Raad, a Lebanese-born artist who lives and works in New York. Focusing on the history of car bombings in the Lebanese wars, the project includes a 17-minutes long video and a series of 43 photographs. The allusive title, We Can Make Rain But No One Came to Ask, refers to the impossibility of prognosis, less in terms of weather conditions, and more in terms of the future historical, geopolitical, and cultural conditions.
Raad has created a work  specifically for the List Art Center lobby. The large four-part mural depicts the post 9/11 sociopolitical landscape. The background of each wall of the lobby is painted in a different shade of blue, referencing the sky over New York on September 11, 2001. The rough, sketchy drawings are digitally manipulated courtroom drawings that the artist compiled for a number of years after 9/11, left intentionally unfinished to remain ambiguous in origin and reference.


Curated by Vesela Sretenovic
image: Proposal for wall drawing

Location Gallery and Lobby
Student Exhibition 2008
March 15, 2008 - March 30, 2008

The 28th annual juried Student Exhibition is sponsored by the Bell Gallery and the Department of Visual Art. Murray McMillan and Anne Tait served as jurors.  Both artists teach at Roger Williams University in Bristol. The exhibition is open to all Brown students. It provides students with the valuable experience of showing their work within a professional setting, while at the same time providing the Brown and Providence communities an opportunity to view works by talented young artists. Artists in this year’s exhibition are Dara Bayer, Megan Billman, Anne Blazejack, Cody L. Campanie, Cheih Chin Chiang, Jesse Cohn, Thomas Dahlberg, Sara D’Apolito Dworkin, Lauren Engel, Sarah Faux, Hilary Fischer-Groban, Elizabeth Fisher, Jay Gidwitz, Brooke Hair, Melissa Henry, Henry G. Lee, Katrina Lencek-Inagaki, David Lloyd, Kelly Ma, Alice Malone, Mary MacGill, Sarah Meiklejohn, Rachel Moranis, Sophia Narrett, Stephen Neidich, Rebecca Nelson, Alice Nystrom, Erica Palmiter, Kim Perley, Alex Rosenbaum, Victoria Roth, Malika Rubin-Davis, David Watson Sobel, Lydia Stein, John Szymanski, Jessica Taylor, Miho Tomimasu, Mark Tumiski, Paul Wallace, Christina Wang, Aaron Weinstein, and Hannah Wohl.

image: Megan Billman, Miss Narrative 3, 2007

Location Gallery and Lobby
Cut Folded Dyed & Glued: Sculpture by Imi Hwangbo and Jae Ko
January 26, 2008 - March 5, 2008

Imi Hwangbo and Jae Ko’s abstract works share an elegant simplicity and beauty. Both artists work with simple materials and employ labor-intensive methods. In this they exemplify a current movement of artists who are at ease with technology and instantaneity but seek the hand-crafted and laborious.  In addition, the artists draw on their Korean heritage referencing the country's famed papercrafts and decorative arts.

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Imi Hwangbo, Peri, 2007

Location Gallery
Women's Work: Selections from the Collection
January 1, 2008

Women's Work: Selections from the Collection features the work of Lee Bontecou, Jennifer Bartlett, Hannah Wilke, Maggie Poor, Leslie Dill, Joan Snyder, and Miriam Schapiro.

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Jennifer Bartlett, Day and Night, 1978

Location Lobby
Selections from the Permanent Collection
January 1, 2008

Selections from the Permanent Collection includes landscapes and abstractions by Abbott, Siskind, Motherwell, Muller, La Farge, Callahan, Redon, van Rijn, van Ostade, von Ruisdael, Kandinsky, La Va, Perrott, Brodsky & Utkin, Piranest, and Canaletto.

Curated by Vesela Sretenovic
image: Aaron Siskind, Martha's Vineyard Stone Walls 111A, 1954

Location Lobby
KIDS: Julie Blackmon, Jill Greenberg, Ruud van Empel
November 3, 2007 - December 21, 2007

Julie Blackmon, Jill Greenberg, and Ruud van Empel photograph children, creating fictional images that elicit reactions ranging from amusement to astonishment to shock. While photography of children is as old as the medium itself, the works in this exhibition represent a recent approach aided by digital techniques. Each of these artists uses digital techniques to separate photography from its associations with reality. Blackmon collages elements and Greenberg draws on the images. Van Empel uses the most elaborate techniques, building his images element by element and often compiling more than 100 individual elements in a single image. Extending the late-twentieth-century movement toward “fabricated” imagery, they shift photography further and further away from its association with reality

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Julie Blackmon, Gum, 2005

Location Gallery and Lobby
Jukai: an architectural environment by Yumi Kori
September 8, 2007 - October 21, 2007

JUKAI is an architectural environment by Japanese artist Yumi Kori, conceived specifically for the Bell Gallery. Accompanied by a sound installation by Austrian composer and sound artist Bernhard Gal, this site-specific piece tests the limits of sensory experience, spatial and temporal.

Curated by Vesela Sretenovic
image: installation view of JUKAI 

Location Gallery