David Winton Bell Gallery

Past Exhibitions

September 6, 2008 - October 19, 2008

Seventeen years after the end of the Soviet Union, Views and Re-Views invites a post-Cold War assessment of Soviet graphic arts. The exhibition suggests that artistic merit may be found in art in the service of political belief and subject to state regulation and that there is a range of stylistic diversity within work that is too often simply (and dismissively) characterized as Socialist Realism. Viewers may also note that with the passage of time it has become possible to see that not all criticisms of the West by Soviet artists are completely spurious or inauthentic. Views and Re-Views includes posters, cartoons, photomontages, and postcards spanning more than six decades, from the time of the Russian Civil War (1918–21) into the late Soviet period. The exhibition includes well-known Soviet graphic works, by such artists as Viktor Deni, Dmitri Moor, El Lissitsky, and Gustav Klutsis, as well as lesser-known, but equally compelling works by the Kukryniksy (a three-artist collaborative), Alexander Zhitomirsky, and others. Drawn from an extensive private collection of Soviet propaganda, the exhibition includes more than 160 images.

Co-curated by Abbott Gleason and Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Alexander Zhitomirsky, Hysterical War Drummer, 1948

Location Gallery and Lobby, John Hay Library, Cogut Center for the Humanities, and the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library
Self and Others: Jesse Burke, Amy Lovera, Annu Palajunnatha Matthew, Linn Underhill, Sage Sohier, Millee Tibbs
June 7, 2008 - July 8, 2008

The artists included in Self and Others explore their identity in relationship to others, i.e. family, friends, or society.  Burke and Sage approach the self through family; Matthew focuses on ethnicity; Underhill and Burke examine gender; Tibbs compares her child and adult selves; and Lovera posits a fictionalized self as girl-adventurer, à la Pippi Longstocking.

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Jesse Burke, from Masculinity, 2005-2007

Location Gallery
Walid Raad: We can make it rain but no one came to ask
April 10, 2008 - May 25, 2008

We Can Make Rain But No One Came to Ask is a project by Walid Raad, a Lebanese-born artist who lives and works in New York. Focusing on the history of car bombings in the Lebanese wars, the project includes a 17-minutes long video and a series of 43 photographs. The allusive title, We Can Make Rain But No One Came to Ask, refers to the impossibility of prognosis, less in terms of weather conditions, and more in terms of the future historical, geopolitical, and cultural conditions.
Raad has created a work  specifically for the List Art Center lobby. The large four-part mural depicts the post 9/11 sociopolitical landscape. The background of each wall of the lobby is painted in a different shade of blue, referencing the sky over New York on September 11, 2001. The rough, sketchy drawings are digitally manipulated courtroom drawings that the artist compiled for a number of years after 9/11, left intentionally unfinished to remain ambiguous in origin and reference.


Curated by Vesela Sretenovic
image: Proposal for wall drawing

Location Gallery and Lobby
Student Exhibition 2008
March 15, 2008 - March 30, 2008

The 28th annual juried Student Exhibition is sponsored by the Bell Gallery and the Department of Visual Art. Murray McMillan and Anne Tait served as jurors.  Both artists teach at Roger Williams University in Bristol. The exhibition is open to all Brown students. It provides students with the valuable experience of showing their work within a professional setting, while at the same time providing the Brown and Providence communities an opportunity to view works by talented young artists. Artists in this year’s exhibition are Dara Bayer, Megan Billman, Anne Blazejack, Cody L. Campanie, Cheih Chin Chiang, Jesse Cohn, Thomas Dahlberg, Sara D’Apolito Dworkin, Lauren Engel, Sarah Faux, Hilary Fischer-Groban, Elizabeth Fisher, Jay Gidwitz, Brooke Hair, Melissa Henry, Henry G. Lee, Katrina Lencek-Inagaki, David Lloyd, Kelly Ma, Alice Malone, Mary MacGill, Sarah Meiklejohn, Rachel Moranis, Sophia Narrett, Stephen Neidich, Rebecca Nelson, Alice Nystrom, Erica Palmiter, Kim Perley, Alex Rosenbaum, Victoria Roth, Malika Rubin-Davis, David Watson Sobel, Lydia Stein, John Szymanski, Jessica Taylor, Miho Tomimasu, Mark Tumiski, Paul Wallace, Christina Wang, Aaron Weinstein, and Hannah Wohl.

image: Megan Billman, Miss Narrative 3, 2007

Location Gallery and Lobby
Cut Folded Dyed & Glued: Sculpture by Imi Hwangbo and Jae Ko
January 26, 2008 - March 5, 2008

Imi Hwangbo and Jae Ko’s abstract works share an elegant simplicity and beauty. Both artists work with simple materials and employ labor-intensive methods. In this they exemplify a current movement of artists who are at ease with technology and instantaneity but seek the hand-crafted and laborious.  In addition, the artists draw on their Korean heritage referencing the country's famed papercrafts and decorative arts.

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Imi Hwangbo, Peri, 2007

Location Gallery
Women's Work: Selections from the Collection
January 1, 2008

Women's Work: Selections from the Collection features the work of Lee Bontecou, Jennifer Bartlett, Hannah Wilke, Maggie Poor, Leslie Dill, Joan Snyder, and Miriam Schapiro.

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Jennifer Bartlett, Day and Night, 1978

Location Lobby
Selections from the Permanent Collection
January 1, 2008

Selections from the Permanent Collection includes landscapes and abstractions by Abbott, Siskind, Motherwell, Muller, La Farge, Callahan, Redon, van Rijn, van Ostade, von Ruisdael, Kandinsky, La Va, Perrott, Brodsky & Utkin, Piranest, and Canaletto.

Curated by Vesela Sretenovic
image: Aaron Siskind, Martha's Vineyard Stone Walls 111A, 1954

Location Lobby
KIDS: Julie Blackmon, Jill Greenberg, Ruud van Empel
November 3, 2007 - December 21, 2007

Julie Blackmon, Jill Greenberg, and Ruud van Empel photograph children, creating fictional images that elicit reactions ranging from amusement to astonishment to shock. While photography of children is as old as the medium itself, the works in this exhibition represent a recent approach aided by digital techniques. Each of these artists uses digital techniques to separate photography from its associations with reality. Blackmon collages elements and Greenberg draws on the images. Van Empel uses the most elaborate techniques, building his images element by element and often compiling more than 100 individual elements in a single image. Extending the late-twentieth-century movement toward “fabricated” imagery, they shift photography further and further away from its association with reality

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Julie Blackmon, Gum, 2005

Location Gallery and Lobby
Jukai: an architectural environment by Yumi Kori
September 8, 2007 - October 21, 2007

JUKAI is an architectural environment by Japanese artist Yumi Kori, conceived specifically for the Bell Gallery. Accompanied by a sound installation by Austrian composer and sound artist Bernhard Gal, this site-specific piece tests the limits of sensory experience, spatial and temporal.

Curated by Vesela Sretenovic
image: installation view of JUKAI 

Location Gallery
Natured Anew: Reflections of the natural world by Doug Bosch, Brian Burkhardt, Bruce Chao, Barbara Takenaga, and Neeta Madaha
June 20, 2007 - July 8, 2007

The artists in Natured Anew—Doug Bosch, Brian Burkhardt, Bruce Chao, Barbara Takenaga, and Neeta Madaharproduce works that are inspired by or comment on the natural world. Employing painting, sculpture, photography, and video, their works range from sublimely beautiful depictions of the cosmos to whimsical ballets of dancing seedpods and humorous hybrid creatures that fuse nature and technology. The artists also share an interest in abstraction and emphasis on systems, repetition, and patterning.

Curated by Jo-Ann Conklin
image: Barbara Takenaga, Blue Tremor, 2003

Location Gallery and Lobby
Urban Landscapes . . . emancipation and nostalgia. Sze Tsung Leong, Sabine Hornig, and Catherine Yass
April 18, 2007 - May 27, 2007

Urban Landscapes…emancipation and nostalgia feature works by British artist Catherine Yass, New York artist Sze Tsung Leong, and German artist Sabrine Hornig. The underlying theme of the exhibition is the transformative character of urban landscapes, involving both physical destruction and construction, and a feeling of emancipation and nostalgia.

Curated by Vesela Sretenovic
image: Catherine Yass, still from Lock 2006

Location Gallery and Lobby
Student Exhibition 2007
March 17, 2007 - April 1, 2007

The David Winton Bell Gallery and the Department of Visual Art at Brown University present Student Exhibition 2007, the 27th annual student exhibition. This year’s jurors are Magaly Ponce, a Chilean-born video and installation artist, and Munir D. Mohamed, a painter originally from Kumasi, Ghana. Artists included in the exhibition are: Olutade Abidoye, Nora Blackall, Galen Broderick, Jessie Chaney, Simon Charlow, Jesse Cohn, Tryn Collins, Kriya Gishen, Oliver Daly, Noel Madison Fetting-Smith, Annie Fish, Lauren Fisher, Tihtina Zenebe Gebre, Sarah Goldstein, Lindsay Harrison, Melissa Henry, Sarah Hotchkiss, Shanay Jhaveri, Lily Kerrigan, Julie Kumar, Sarah Labrie, Gillian Lang, Geddes Levenson, David Lloyd, Yifan Luo, Zachary Miller, Rebecca Nelson, Tasha Ong, Pook Panyarachun, Miranda Elliott Rader, Emily Roberts, Talia Rozensher, Claire Russo, Max Schoening, Jessica Simmons, David Watson Sobel, Sung-A Jang, Lydia Stein, John Szymanski, Jessica Taylor, Meris Tombari, Mark Tumiski, Sushant Wagley, K. Adam White, and Sabine Zimmer.

image: Pook Panyarachun, Untitled, 2007

Location Gallery and Lobby