Child Track - Clinical Child Psychology

Clinical Child Psychology 

The Clinical Child Psychology Track provides in-depth training in clinical child psychology within the context of a variety of treatment settings, including inpatient, partial hospital, outpatient, therapeutic school, and home-based environments. In each setting residents will be involved in assessment, treatment, and consultations tailored to best fit each clinical setting. Residents can work with children and adolescents across the age spectrum and with a wide variety of emotional, behavioral, and neurodevelopmental challenges. Individual, family, and group therapy interventions are utilized, with an emphasis on evidence-based practices best suited for the population being treated.  Children and adolescents represent a wide range of populations in terms of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexuality, and gender identity.  Residents complete three 4-month primary rotations within clinical programs that are affiliated with Bradley Hospital. The clinical psychology residents can rank-order the following rotations (described in detail below), based on their particular interests and training goals: Children’s Partial Hospital Program Rotation, Community-Based Therapeutic School Rotation, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Rotation, Adolescent Inpatient Unit, and Anxiety and OCD Partial Hospital program. In addition, they can participate in supplemental rotations from both the Clinical Child Psychology and Pediatric Psychology Supplemental options.

Clinical Child Psychology Primary Rotations 

Each primary rotation lasts four months. Clinical psychology residents within the Clinical Child Psychology Specialty spend the equivalent of three days per week on their primary rotations.

Children's Partial Hospital Program Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Anne Walters, PhD

In the Children’s Partial Hospital Program rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in assessment, treatment, and consultation with children who present with serious emotional and behavioral challenges. The children (ranging in age from 7-12 years old) display a broad range of psychopathology and typically remain in the program for 3-6 weeks. Typically about 20% of the children present with Autism Spectrum Disorders (mild range), and all children present with high levels of co-morbidity (anxiety disorders, school refusal, mood disorders, psychotic spectrum disorders, ADHD, ODD, family conflict). The program aims to provide intensive therapeutic interventions with children and their families, beginning with a comprehensive family and child assessment, followed by goal setting with the family and child.

Clinical psychology residents will participate and receive supervision in all aspects of the partial hospital program. They will complete clinical and diagnostic evaluations of patients and their families, as well as providing individual, group, and/or family therapies. Clinical psychology residents typically have the opportunity to provide empirically-based treatments for children within individual and group formats and families (as co-therapist) within individual family and multi-family group formats. Residents may have opportunities to consult to program staff regarding appropriate milieu interventions and the outcome of psychological assessments. Residents will also participate in planning and consultation regarding patient transition back to community settings (school and outpatient therapies).

Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with a multidisciplinary treatment team that includes milieu therapists, nurses, teachers, psychologists, social workers, art therapists, occupational therapists, and psychiatrists.

Community-Based Therapeutic School Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Jamie Hollenbeck, PsyD, Lisa Freda, PsyD, Christina Bellanti, PhD, & Melanie Dubard, PhD

In the Community-Based Therapeutic School rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in assessment, treatment, and consultation with youth who have serious emotional, behavioral, and neurodevelopmental challenges that have interfered with their ability to be educated within the public school setting. The students (ranging in age from 3-21 years old) have been referred from school districts in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut for placement at the Bradley School, a community-based therapeutic day school.  We have a diverse population in terms of diagnosis, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status that differs based on the specific school location.  Within each school, there are a variety of classrooms organized by educational, emotional, and neurodevelopmental needs offering opportunities to work with youth with a wide variety of presenting problems and co-morbidities. 

Clinical psychology residents will participate and receive supervision in all aspects of the day treatment program. They may complete cognitive, adaptive, and clinical evaluations, as well as providing individual, and group therapies. Classroom-based cognitive-behavioral interventions are provided to all students, and clinical psychology residents may serve as consultants to the classroom staff as these interventions are developed, implemented, and monitored. In addition, residents may have the opportunity to implement additional evidence-based curricula in specific classrooms, depending on their training goals, and expertise.

Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with multidisciplinary treatment teams that include special education teachers, classroom behavior specialists, school nurses, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, and speech/language pathologists.

OCD and Anxiety Partial Hospital Rotation in the Pediatric Anxiety Research Center
Faculty Supervisor(s): Jennifer Freeman, PhD 

This rotation provides training in empirically supported assessment and treatment of severe obsessive-compulsive/anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in a partial hospital setting. The multidisciplinary team is comprised of clinical psychology and psychiatry residents and fellows, as well as psychologists, psychiatrists, and milieu staff. Mornings and afternoons are spent working with youth with severe anxiety/obsessive-compulsive symptoms within the Bradley Hospital Intensive OCD and Related Disorders Program (morning and afternoon partial hospital programs).

In the OCD and Anxiety program, trainees will have opportunities to assess and treat children and adolescents who present with severe OCD and other functionally impairing anxiety disorders that are likely to benefit from a primary exposure model of treatment. The OCD program provides integrated daily (morning or after-school) hospital- and community-based treatment for children and adolescents (aged 5-18 years) with primary OCD/anxiety and a range of co-morbid disorders such as autism spectrum disorders and other neurodevelopmental disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, mood disorders, and a host of other diagnoses. Patients participate in individual and group-based exposure therapy, as well as psychoeducation, motivational enhancement, family therapy, and psychopharmacologic assessment and treatment. Patients also receive 2-5 home or community visits every week. Clinical psychology residents will be responsible for attending treatment team meetings (on the three days they are in the program) and treating 3 cases in conjunction with a staff psychologist. Treatment will include both individual and family therapy. Clinical psychology residents will also spend time daily in the milieu, working on individual and group-based exposure treatment with patients and working with milieu therapists. Group supervision will be provided during treatment team meetings. Formal individual supervision will occur, however, daily individual supervision occurs in the context of the treatment day. Opportunities for residents to supervise milieu staff will occur during treatment team meetings, as well as during milieu time. Opportunities will also exist for clinical psychology residents to participate in home/community visits if they are interested.

Adolescent Inpatient Rotation
Faculty Supervisor: Katie Affleck, PhD & Jennifer Wolff, PhD 
This rotation provides training in empirically-supported assessment and treatment of severe mood disorders on an inpatient unit. The multidisciplinary team is comprised of clinical psychology and psychiatry residents and fellows, as well as psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, nurses, and milieu staff.  On the AIU, trainees have opportunities to assess adolescents with acute psychopathology and suicidality. Primary presenting problems include depression, severe trauma histories, anxiety, psychosis, behavior problems, substance use, and emerging personality disorders. The AIU serves a diverse patient population in terms of race, socioeconomic status, sexuality, and gender identity. Approximately 40-45% of patients identify as a sexual or gender minority and a third of patients are involved with the Department of Children, Youth, and Families (DCYF).

Clinical psychology residents participate in a range of activities including diagnostic interviews, individual therapy, and group therapy. Clinical psychology residents provide empirically-based individual treatment to 3-4 patients that is tailored to short-term care (average patient length of stay is 9 days). The primary interventions utilized are Cognitive Behavioral and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. Residents will also have exposure to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Motivational Interviewing throughout the rotation. Clinical psychology residents attend morning rounds with the multidisciplinary team and receive individual and group supervision. Opportunities for residents to supervise practicum students and milieu staff are also available.

Adolescent Partial Hospital Rotation (APHP) 
Faculty Supervisor: Elizabeth Frazier, PhD
In the Adolescent Partial Hospital Program (APHP) rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in family, individual, and group therapy with adolescents who present with serious emotional and behavioral challenges. Adolescents display a broad range of psychopathology and typically remain in the program for 2-3 weeks. The program aims to provide intensive therapeutic interventions with adolescents and their families, as well as consultation with their schools. Clinical psychology residents will participate and receive supervision in all aspects of the partial hospital program. They will complete clinical evaluations of patients and their families, as well as provide individual, group, and family therapies. Clinical psychology residents typically have the opportunity to provide empirically-based treatments for adolescents within individual and group formats and for families (as co-therapist initially). Clinical psychology residents will also participate in planning and consultation regarding patient transition back to community settings (school and outpatient therapies). Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with a multidisciplinary treatment team that includes milieu therapists, nurses, teachers, psychologists, occupational therapists, art therapists, social workers, and psychiatrists. Opportunities for in-person and telehealth options are typically available.

Clinical Child Psychology Supplemental Rotations

One day per week throughout the training year is available for supplemental rotations. Supplemental rotations involve half day or full day experiences, and rotation length may be 4, 6, 8, or 12 months. Each clinical child psychology resident is asked to select at least one pediatric supplemental and one clinical child supplemental, though additional supplementals typically are chosen, as long as scheduling allows. Trainee may choose Supplemental Rotations from the Pediatric Psychology and/or Clinical Child Psychology Specialty options (see additional supplemental options under Pediatric Psychology description).

Anxiety Clinic Rotation 
Faculty Supervisor(s): Jennifer Herren, PhD & Michael Walther, PhD
The purpose of the PARC Anxiety Clinic rotation is to allow trainees to gain more specialized and long-term experience in the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, with an emphasis on pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The patient population includes primarily outpatient child and adolescent cases with diagnoses including OCD, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Separation Anxiety Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, and school avoidance. Children with Selective Mutism, Trichotillomania, and Tic Disorders may be seen as well.  The focus of the training is on the delivery of principle-based CBT. While specific CBT intervention is case and diagnosis-dependent, the use of exposure therapy is emphasized. This rotation offers the opportunity to see cases at an outpatient level that have stepped down from a partial level of care, have co-morbid medical problems and/or physical complaints, involve family-based exposure interventions, as well as have other comorbid diagnoses, such as Autism Spectrum Disorder and depressive disorders.  This supplemental rotation requires participation for half a day per week.  

Autism Intensive Behavior Treatment (IBT) Program Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Karyn Blane, PsyD
This rotation provides the opportunity for clinical psychology residents to acquire knowledge and experience with applied behavior analytic (ABA) treatment methodology and individualized interventions for children across SES levels with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This home-based training focuses on understanding the science of ABA and involves the systematic application of behavioral methods to promote behavior change and the learning of new skills in the home and community settings. In addition, parent training and the generalization of skills are essential components of the treatment. The age range of the population is 2-7 years old. Clinical psychology residents can participate in this supplemental rotation for a half-day or one full day per week. Trainees can participate as members of treatment teams by directing individualized discrete trial training programs, consulting with families to promote consistency across environments, planning and implementing social and play opportunities for children, and developing techniques to monitor and assess the effectiveness of intensive behavioral treatment programs. Practical solutions and recommendations are emphasized across this rotation to support optimal progress for the children and families, and to maintain skills across settings. Trainees must have reliable transportation to be able to fully participate in this rotation. 

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Assessment Clinic Rotation 
Faculty Supervisor(s): Casey Cragin, PsyD
The purpose of this rotation is to allow clinical psychology residents to obtain more specialized training in the assessment and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder in toddlerhood and early childhood. There is a heavy emphasis on differential diagnosis and case conceptualization, as well as translating evaluation findings into meaningful treatment and educational recommendations. The clinical psychology resident will gain experience in clinical assessment methods, including semi-structured interviews, formal and informal observational methods, and selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of appropriate psychometric assessments. The clinical psychology resident’s experience will be tailored to their background and goals. Typically, there are 1-2 new evaluations scheduled each month, with additional follow-up visits in which the clinical psychology resident participates. Clinical psychology residents can participate in this supplemental rotation for one half-day or full-day per week. The full-day option offers additional exposure to comprehensive report writing and ongoing family consultation and treatment.  

Early Childhood Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Christine Low, PhD, Rebecca Newland, PhD, & Rebecca Silver, PhD
This rotation provides the opportunity for clinical psychology residents to receive specialized training in early childhood mental health. The rotation focuses on early childhood mental health consultation, primarily in early care and education settings. This service involves assessment of identified children at their early learning program (including classroom observations, standardized questionnaires, and interviews with family caregivers and teachers), feedback and recommendations provided to families and childcare staff, and individualized follow-up supports and coaching to implement recommendations in the classroom. This consultation service serves children and families across the state, and prioritizes programs who accept state childcare subsidies; approximately 10% of children served are in foster care.  Clinical psychology residents participate for a half-day per week, for a minimum of 6 months. 

Outpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents (DBT-A) Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Kerri Kim, PhD

The purpose of the Outpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents (DBT-A) rotation is to allow trainees to gain experience in providing high-fidelity DBT skills training to multi-problem adolescents, either in a standard multifamily group setting or in an adapted teen-only version. Generally, the Outpatient DBT-A program at Bradley Hospital (Mindful Teen) serves male and female adolescents (ages 13-18) who present with suicidality and/or nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), as well as associated diagnostic comorbidity (most common mood and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, substance abuse disorders, and ADHD). Given their level of clinical acuity and diagnostic complexity, these adolescents have typically made minimal progress in standard outpatient therapy and have often had multiple hospitalizations and/or admissions to higher levels of care (such as partial hospitalization and/or residential programs). The latter adapted group is provided in partnership with Compass Lincoln House, a Lifespan DBT-A residential program providing care to females (ages 13-18) who are referred and placed by the Department of Children, Youth, and Families. Residents participating in this rotation will develop familiarity with an empirically validated, manual-based DBT-A skills training protocol through serving as a group co-leader. Specifically, residents will have the opportunity to observe and progressively participate in the teaching and review of DBT-A skills (including mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, interpersonal effectiveness, and middle path skills).  They will also be able to develop their mindfulness skills and lead adolescents (and caregivers) in various mindfulness exercises. Residents will co-lead the 18-session group with an intensively DBT trained clinician, receive supervision from a licensed psychologist focused on case conceptualization and development of DBT-specific competencies, and participate in weekly group planning. They will also be provided with readings and other didactic experiences to foster their understanding of DBT treatment as appropriate. The Mindful Teen Program serves a diverse population, with approximately 35-40% of youth enrolled in Mindful Teen identifying as a sexual minority. About half of youth enrolled in Mindful Teen have Medicaid coverage, whereas the other half pay for the program through commercial insurance plans or out-of-pocket.

Groups are held on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons (3:45-5:45pm) with supervision and group planning meetings typically occurring the hour before the group. Tuesday is the standard multi-family skills training group, whereas Thursday is the adapted teen-only skills training group for Lincoln House residents. A minimum 6-month commitment of 4 hours per week is required for this supplemental rotation.

Outpatient Psychotherapy for children/teens with Developmental Disabilities: Verrecchia Clinic Rotation 
Faculty Supervisors: Karen Cammuso, PhD & Shivali Sarawgi, PhD 
The Verrecchia Clinic Rotation provides clinical psychology residents with the opportunity to gain experience in providing outpatient therapy services (e.g., parent training, individual and group therapy) with children, adolescents, and young adults with developmental challenges, including Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).  The clinic is part of Bradley Hospital’s Outpatient Services.  Patients are school-aged (5-22) and include referrals from the community as well as from partial and inpatient levels of care.  Patients in this clinic often exhibit complex psychiatric (e.g., depression, mood dysregulation, anxiety, ADHD, and disruptive behavior disorders) and medical (e.g., genetic disorders, sleep and feeding problems) presentations unique to individuals with developmental disabilities.  The focus of the training is learning to use specialized evidence-based therapies, as well as strategies to support neurodiverse patients in the therapy setting.  Groups offered include parent training, CBT/exposure therapy for anxiety, and adapted DBT (anticipated).  Residents can co-lead groups based on schedule availability.  A minimum six-month commitment of four hours per week is required, and clinical psychology residents may participate for up to 8 hours weekly. 

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