Child Rotations

Child Track

Jennifer Wolff, PhD, Track Coordinator

Clinical psychology residents in the Child Track stay within track for the entire training year. This allows for greater depth and breadth of training for clinical psychology residents already committed to working with children, adolescents, and families. The general goal of the Child Track is to promote the achievement of skills in the assessment and treatment of a variety of childhood disorders, while allowing the clinical psychology resident to gain greater depth of experience in specific areas of interest within clinical child and pediatric psychology. Toward this end, clinical psychology residents have access to diverse patient populations, the full developmental spectrum, and a wide range of clinical and research settings that emphasize multidisciplinary assessment, consultation, treatment, and research. 

The Child Track is organized in such a way as to allow clinical psychology residents to focus in one of three areas: Clinical Child PsychologyPediatric Psychology, or Juvenile Justice/Behavioral Health

  • The three clinical psychology residents in Clinical Child Psychology complete three 4-month primary rotations within clinical programs that are affiliated with Bradley Hospital. The residents are able to rank-order the following rotations, based on their particular interests and training goals: Children’s Partial Hospital Program Rotation, Community-Based Therapeutic School Rotation, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Rotation, and Adolescent Inpatient Unit Rotation, OCD and Anxiety Disorders Partial Hospital Rotation. 
  • The two clinical psychology residents in Pediatric Psychology complete three 4-month primary rotations in the pediatric psychology program at Hasbro Children’s Hospital/Rhode Island Hospital.  The pediatric primary rotations are organized in such a way that pediatric clinical psychology residents participate in experiences emphasizing inpatient pediatric psychology, a day treatment hospitalization program for combined medical/psychological concerns, and outpatient/integrated care settings with the focus of learning skills appropriate for a range of levels of care. 
  • The two clinical psychology residents in Juvenile Justice/Behavioral Health complete two 8-month and two 4-month primary rotations within clinical programs that are affiliated with Rhode Island and Bradley Hospitals. Each resident participates in the following rotations: Juvenile Court Clinic Rotation, Substance Use Intensive Outpatient Rotation, and the Juvenile Detention Rotation but the schedule will differ depending on whether the resident has a primary Substance Abuse focus versus a primary Juvenile Justice/Forensic Evaluation focus.

In addition to primary rotations, each clinical psychology resident within the Child Track has 1/2 to 1 day per week to select 2 or more supplemental rotations from a menu of options (see Child Track Rotations below). The supplemental rotations include full day or half day options for 4, 6, 8, or 12 months.

These supplemental rotations provide training within existing or new specialty areas and allow each clinical psychology resident to further design an individualized training experience. All clinical psychology residents in the Child Track also are involved in a research placement with a faculty member chosen based on overlapping interests. Clinical psychology residents are asked to indicate specific mentors in their application. In addition, they participate in a weekly seminar series devoted to topics of interest in clinical child and pediatric psychology (including peer supervision), and they join their colleagues from the other tracks for monthly Grand Rounds and a weekly seminar series devoted to topics of general interest to all clinical psychology residents. 

The Child Track is composed of the following rotations:

Clinical Child Psychology 

The Clinical Child Psychology provides in-depth training in clinical child psychology within the context of a variety of treatment settings, including inpatient, partial hospital, outpatient, therapeutic school, and home-based environments. In each setting residents will be involved in assessment, treatment, and consultations tailored to best fit each clinical setting. Residents are able to work with children and adolescents across the age spectrum and with a wide variety of emotional, behavioral, and neurodevelopmental challenges. Individual, family, and group therapy interventions are utilized, with an emphasis on evidence-based practices best suited for the population being treated.  Children and adolescents represent a wide range of populations in terms of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexuality, and gender identity.  Residents complete three 4-month primary rotations within clinical programs that are affiliated with Bradley Hospital. The clinical psychology residents are able to rank-order the following rotations (described in detail below), based on their particular interests and training goals: Children’s Partial Hospital Program Rotation, Community-Based Therapeutic School Rotation, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Rotation, Adolescent Inpatient Unit, and Anxiety and OCD Partial Hospital program. In addition, they are able to participate in supplemental rotations from both the Clinical Child Psychology and Pediatric Psychology Supplemental options.

Clinical Child Psychology Primary Rotations 

Each primary rotation lasts four months. First rotation runs from July through October, second rotation runs from November through February, and third rotation runs from March through June. Residents within the Clinical Child Psychology Specialty spend the equivalent of three days per week on their primary rotations.

Children's Partial Hospital Program Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Anne Walters, PhD

In the Children’s Partial Hospital Program rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in assessment, treatment, and consultation with children who present with serious emotional and behavioral challenges within a partial hospital setting. The children (ranging in age from 7-12 years old) display a broad range of psychopathology and typically remain in the program for 3-6 weeks.  60% of the population is male, 39% are female, 1% are nonbinary.  Typically about 20% of the children present with Autism Spectrum Disorders (mild range), and all children present with high levels of co-morbidity (anxiety disorders, school refusal, mood disorders, psychotic spectrum disorders, ADHD, ODD, family conflict) .  In terms of demographics, the racial/ethnic and SES breakdown is as follows:  76.7% Caucasian, 5.2% African American, 1% Asian, 1.7% American Indian/Alaska Native, 12.5% Hispanic/Latino, 3.5% mixed race, or 2.4% other. 59.9% have state funded insurance (e.g., Medicaid) and 40.1% have commercial/private insurance. The program aims to provide intensive therapeutic interventions with children and their families, beginning with a comprehensive family and child assessment, followed by goal setting with family and child based on this assessment.

Clinical psychology residents will participate and receive supervision in all aspects of the partial hospital program. They will complete clinical and diagnostic evaluations of patients and their families, as well as providing individual, group, and/or family therapies. Residents typically have the opportunity to provide empirically-based treatments for children within individual and group formats and for families (as co-therapist) within individual family and multi-family group formats. Residents may have opportunities to consult to program staff regarding appropriate milieu interventions and the outcome of psychological assessments. Residents will also participate in planning and consultation regarding patient transition back to community settings (school and outpatient therapies).

Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with a multidisciplinary treatment team that includes milieu therapists, nurses, teachers, psychologists, social workers, art therapists, occupational therapists, and psychiatrists.

Community-Based Therapeutic School Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Jamie Hollenbeck, PsyD, Christina Bellanti, PhD, Melanie Dubard, PhD, & James Brcak, PsyD

In the Community-Based Therapeutic School rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in assessment, treatment, and consultation with youth who have serious emotional, behavioral, and neurodevelopmental challenges that have interfered with their ability to be educated within the public school setting. The students (ranging in age from 3-21 years old) have been referred from school districts in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut for placement at the Bradley School, a community-based therapeutic day school.  We have a diverse population in terms of diagnosis, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status that differs based on the specific school location.  Within each school, there are a variety of classrooms organized both by educational and emotional/neurodevelopmental needs offering opportunities to work with youth with a wide variety of presenting problems and co-morbidities. 

Clinical psychology residents will participate and receive supervision in all aspects of the day treatment program. They may complete cognitive, adaptive, and clinical evaluations, as well as providing individual, and group therapies. Classroom-based cognitive-behavioral interventions are provided to all students, and clinical psychology residents may serve as consultants to the classroom staff as these interventions are developed, implemented, and monitored. In addition, residents may have the opportunity to implement additional evidence-based curricula in specific classrooms, depending on their training goals, and expertise.

Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with multidisciplinary treatment teams that include special education teachers, classroom behavior specialists, school nurses, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists, and speech/language pathologists.

OCD and Anxiety Partial Hospital Rotation in the Pediatric Anxiety Research Center
Faculty Supervisor(s): Jennifer Freeman, PhD and Abbe Garcia, PhD

This rotation provides training in empirically-supported assessment and treatment of severe obsessive-compulsive/anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in a partial hospital setting. The multidisciplinary team is comprised of psychology and psychiatry residents and fellows, as well as psychologists, psychiatrists, and milieu staff. Mornings and afternoons are spent working with youth with severe anxiety/obsessive-compulsive symptoms within the Bradley Hospital Intensive OCD and Related Disorders Program (morning and afternoon partial hospital programs).

In the OCD and Anxiety program, trainees will have opportunities to assess and treat children and adolescents who present with severe OCD and other functionally impairing anxiety disorders that are likely to benefit from a primary exposure model of treatment. The OCD program provides integrated daily (morning or after-school) hospital- and community-based treatment for children and adolescents (aged 5-18 years) with primary OCD/anxiety and a range of co-morbid disorders such as autism spectrum disorders and other neurodevelopmental disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, mood disorders, and a host of other diagnoses. Patients participate in individual and group-based exposure therapy, as well as psychoeducation, motivational enhancement, family therapy, and psychopharmacologic assessment and treatment. Patients also receive 2-5 home or community visits every week. Residents will be responsible for attending treatment team meetings (on the three days they are in the program) and treating 3 cases in conjunction with a staff psychologist. Treatment will include both individual and family therapy. Residents will also spend time daily in the milieu, working on individual and group-based exposure treatment with patients and working with milieu therapists. Group supervision will be provided during treatment team meetings. Formal individual supervision will occur, however, daily individual supervision occurs in the context of the treatment day. Opportunities for residents to supervise milieu staff will occur during treatment team meetings, as well as during milieu time. Opportunities will also exist for residents to participate in home/community visits if they are interested.

Adolescent Inpatient Rotation
Faculty Supervisor: Jennifer Wolff PhD and Marc Perkel PsyD
This rotation provides training in empirically-supported assessment and treatment of severe mood disorders on an inpatient unit. The multidisciplinary team is comprised of psychology and psychiatry residents and fellows, as well as psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, nurses, and milieu staff.  On the AIU, trainees have opportunities to assess adolescents with depressive symptoms who present with a range of co-occurring issues (including suicidality, non-suicidal self-injury, substance use, and behavior problems). Though the majority of patients present with a primary mood disorder, most patients have at least two diagnoses and residents also have the opportunity to work with patients with severe trauma histories, anxiety disorders, psychosis, developmental disabilities, and emerging personality disorders. Residents are responsible for conducting an initial diagnostic assessment and functional analysis. Some adolescents also may require additional cognitive evaluations. The initial assessment is then used to develop a case conceptualization and inform the selection of specific DBT/CBT skills to deliver in short-term treatment on the AIU. Residents will have opportunities to conduct skills groups on the unit, as well as supervise milieu staff who conduct individual skills training. Residents typically carry a case-load of 3-4 patients and provide individual therapy. Therapeutic interventions are typically brief as the average length of stay is typically 7-10 days, though residents do have the opportunity to provide long term individual therapy for patients who are unable to be discharged to a lower level of care and are hospitalized for a longer period of time. Residents will attend morning rounds, case conferences, and group supervision. Supervision includes didactics, review of videotaped sessions, discussion of empirical articles, and treatment planning. The AIU aims to provide empirically supported treatment to adolescents and their families; thus the primary interventions utilized are based in Cognitive Behavioral and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. Residents will also have exposure to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy over the course of the rotation. The AIU serves a diverse patient population that is representative of the diversity of the surrounding area. Patients represent a wide range of populations in terms of race, socioeconomic status, sexuality, and gender identity. Approximately 45% of the patient population identify as LGBTQ, 1/3 are involved with the Department of Children Youth and Families, and 80% report a history of trauma. 

Adolescent Partial Hospital Rotation (APHP) 
Faculty Supervisor: Elizabeth Frazier, PhD
In the Adolescent Partial Hospital Program (APHP) rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in family, individual, and group therapy with adolescents who present with serious emotional and behavioral challenges within a partial hospital setting. The adolescents (ranging in age from 12-18 years old) display a broad range of psychopathology and typically remain in the program for 2-3 weeks. The program aims to provide intensive therapeutic interventions with adolescents and their families, as well as consultation with their schools. Clinical psychology residents will participate and receive supervision in all aspects of the partial hospital program. They will complete clinical evaluations of patients and their families, as well as provide individual, group, and family therapies. Residents typically have the opportunity to provide empirically-based treatments for adolescents within individual and group formats and for families (as co-therapist initially). Residents will also participate in planning and consultation regarding patient transition back to community settings (school and outpatient therapies). Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with a multidisciplinary treatment team that includes milieu therapists, nurses, teachers, psychologists, occupational therapists, art therapists, social workers, and psychiatrists.

Clinical Child Psychology Supplemental Rotations

One day per week throughout the training year is available for supplemental rotations. Supplemental rotations involve half day or full day experiences, and rotation length may be 4, 6, 8, or 12 months. Each clinical child psychology resident is asked to select at least one pediatric supplemental and one clinical child supplemental, though additional supplementals typically are chosen, as long as scheduling allows.

Anxiety Clinic Rotation 
Faculty Supervisor(s): Jennifer Herren, PhD & Michael Walther, PhD
(available as a Supplemental Rotation only for Clinical Child Psychology and Pediatric Psychology residents)
The purpose of the PARC Anxiety Clinic rotation is to allow trainees to gain more specialized and long-term experience in the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, with an emphasis on pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The patient population includes primarily outpatient child and adolescent cases with diagnoses including OCD, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Separation Anxiety Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, and school avoidance. Children with Selective Mutism, Trichotillomania, and Tic Disorders may be seen as well.  The focus of the training is on the delivery of principle-based CBT. While specific CBT intervention is case and diagnosis dependent, use of exposure therapy is emphasized. This rotation offers the opportunity to see cases at an outpatient level that have stepped down from a partial level of care, have co-morbid medical problems and/or physical complaints, involve family-based exposure interventions, as well as have other comorbid diagnoses, such as Autism Spectrum Disorder and depressive disorders.  This supplemental rotation requires participation for half a day per week. 

Autism Intensive Behavior Treatment (IBT) Program Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Karyn Blane, PsyD
(available as a Supplemental Rotation only for Clinical Child Psychology and Pediatric Psychology residents)
This rotation provides the opportunity for clinical psychology residents to acquire knowledge and experience with applied behavior analytic (ABA) treatment methodology and individualized interventions for children across SES levels with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This specialized training focuses on understanding the science of ABA and involves the systematic application of behavioral methods to promote behavior change and the learning of new skills in the home and community settings. In addition, parent training and generalization of skills are essential components of the treatment. The age range of the population is 2-7 years old. Residents can participate in this supplemental rotation for a half day or one full day per week. Trainees can participate as members of treatment teams by directing individualized discrete trial training programs, consulting with families to promote consistency across environments, planning and implementing social and play opportunities for children, and developing techniques to monitor and assess the effectiveness of intensive behavior treatment programs. Practical solutions and recommendations are emphasized across this rotation in order to support optimal progress for the children and families, and to maintain skills across settings.

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Assessment Clinic Rotation 
Faculty Supervisor(s): Stephen Sheinkopf, PhD
(available as a Supplemental Rotation only for Clinical Child Psychology and Pediatric Psychology residents)
The purpose of this rotation is to allow residents to obtain more specialized training in the assessment and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder in late infancy and early childhood. There is a heavy emphasis on differential diagnosis and case conceptualization, as well as translating evaluation findings into meaningful recommendations for education and treatment. The resident will gain experience in clinical assessment methods, including appropriate psychometric assessments, formal and informal observational methods, and semi-structured interviews. The resident’s experience will be tailored to their background and goals. The resident will be responsible for report writing. Typically, there are 1-2 new evaluations scheduled each month, with additional follow-up visits in which the resident participates. Residents can participate in this supplemental rotation for half a day or one full day per week. The full day option offers additional exposure to ongoing follow-up visits and brief consultations. 

Early Childhood Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Christine Low, PhD, Rebecca Newland, PhD, & Rebecca Silver, PhD
(available as a Supplemental Rotation only for Clinical Child Psychology and Pediatric Psychology residents)
This rotation provides the opportunity for residents to receive specialized training in early childhood mental health. There are two components to the early childhood rotation: assessment and treatment of young children and families and early childhood mental health consultation, primarily in early care and education settings. The specific experience will depend on the time availability of the resident.

The Early Childhood Outpatient Program serves families of children ages birth through eight, providing family-based outpatient treatment. Presenting problems typically include emotion and behavior dysregulation, anxiety and selective mutism, concerns about noncompliance, tantrums, and disruptive behaviors, difficulties at childcare/school, adjustment to family transitions and stressful life events, and questions about typical versus atypical development and behavior. The families served are diverse in many ways, particularly in terms of family constellation (e.g., multigenerational families, involved in child welfare) and socioeconomic status. The resident will have the ability to prioritize seeing families that match their training goals (e.g., presenting problems, age, ethnicity, language). The resident will participate in the initial evaluation of the child and the family, provide feedback to the family about recommendations and treatment plan, and provide outpatient therapy, which may include relationship-based treatment, parent behavior management training, and developmentally-appropriate cognitive-behavioral therapy. Residents can participate for a half-day to a full-day/two half-days per week, for a minimum of 6 months. Full-day trainees will also have the opportunity to participate in early childhood mental health consultation in early care and education settings. This service involves assessment of identified children at their early learning program (including classroom observations, standardized questionnaires, and interviews with family caregivers and teachers), feedback and recommendations provided to families and childcare staff, and individualized follow-up supports and coaching to implement recommendations in the classroom. This consultation service serves children and families across the state, and prioritizes programs who accept state childcare subsidies; approximately 10% of children served are in foster care. 

Outpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents (DBT-A) Rotation
Faculty Supervisor(s): Kerri Kim, PhD

(available as a Supplemental Rotation only for Clinical Child Psychology and Pediatric Psychology residents)
This rotation provides the opportunity for clinical psychology residents to acquire knowledge and experience with high-fidelity Dialectical Behavior Therapy for adolescents (DBT-A) and their caregivers by serving as co-leaders in an 18-session, multi-family skills training group. The Outpatient DBT-A program at Bradley Hospital (Mindful Teen) serves male and female adolescents (ages 13-18) who present with suicidality and/or nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), as well as associated diagnostic comorbidity (most commonly mood and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, substance abuse disorders, and ADHD). Given their level of clinical acuity and diagnostic complexity, these adolescents have typically made minimal progress in standard outpatient therapy and have often had multiple hospitalizations and/or admissions to higher levels of care (such as partial hospital and/or residential programs). Residents participating in this rotation will develop familiarity with an empirically validated, manual-based DBT skills training protocol designed for adolescents and their caregivers.  Residents will have the opportunity to observe and progressively participate in the teaching and review of DBT skills (including mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, interpersonal effectiveness, and middle path skills).  Residents will co-lead group with an intensively DBT trained clinician, receive supervision from a licensed psychologist focused on case conceptualization and development of DBT-specific competencies, will participate in weekly group planning, and will be provided with readings and other didactic experiences to foster their understanding of DBT treatment. The Mindful Teen Program serves a diverse population, with approximately 35-40% of youth enrolled in Mindful Teen identifying as a sexual minority. Also about half of youth enrolled in Mindful Teen have Medicaid coverage, whereas the other half pay for the program through commercial insurance plans or out-of-pocket.

Groups are held on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons (3:45-5:45pm) with supervision and group planning meetings typically occurring the hour prior to group. A minimum 6-month commitment of 4 hours per week is required for this supplemental rotation.

Outpatient Psychotherapy for children/teens with Developmental Disabilities: Verrecchia Clinic Rotation 
Faculty Supervisors: Karen Cammuso, PhD, Shivali Sarawgi, PhD, Valerie Vorderstrasse, PsyD 
(available as a Supplemental Rotation only for Clinical Child Psychology and Pediatric Psychology residents)
The Verrecchia Clinic Rotation provides residents with the opportunity to gain experience in providing outpatient therapy services (e.g., parent training, individual and group therapy) with children, adolescents, and young adults with developmental challenges, including Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).  The clinic is part of Bradley Hospital’s Outpatient Services.  Patients are school-aged (5-22) and include referrals from the community as well as from partial and inpatient levels of care.  Patients in this clinic often exhibit complex psychiatric (e.g., depression, mood dysregulation, anxiety, ADHD, and disruptive behavior disorders) and medical (e.g., genetic disorders, sleep and feeding problems) presentations unique to individuals with developmental disabilities.  The focus of the training is learning to use specialized evidence based therapies, as well as strategies to support neurodiverse patients in the therapy setting.  Groups offered include parent training, CBT/exposure therapy for anxiety, and adapted DBT (anticipated).  Residents can co-lead groups based upon schedule availability.  A minimum six-month commitment of four hours per week is required, and residents may participate for up to 8 hours weekly. 

Pediatric Psychology 

The Pediatric Psychology provides in-depth training in pediatric psychology within a general medical setting. It is designed to teach clinical psychology residents assessment, treatment, and consultation skills across a continuum of care settings. 

The Pediatric Psychology training opportunities are organized to provide clinical psychology residents with primary rotations emphasizing three different settings of pediatric psychology: 1) inpatient pediatric psychology, 2) partial hospitalization (day treatment) pediatric psychology, and 3) clinic-based consultation and integrated care pediatric psychology. Children with co-occurring medical and psychological problems constitute the primary treatment population. Training is provided with a variety of pediatric populations via hospital clinics and services (see descriptions below). Trainees also maintain long-term treatment cases via year-long participation on the oncology service. Behavioral interventions constitute the primary therapeutic modalities. Experiences in family and group therapies are also incorporated. Trainees complete all three of the primary rotations listed, as well as supplemental rotations from the Pediatric Psychology and Clinical Child Psychology options.

Pediatric Psychology Primary Rotations

Each primary rotation lasts four months. First rotation runs from July through October, second rotation runs from November through February, and third rotation runs from March through June. Residents in the Pediatric Psychology Specialty will participate in all three of the following primary rotations, organized by level of care provided.

Inpatient Care Rotation
Faculty Supervisors: Vanessa Laurent, PhD, Emily Katz, MD, Margaret Mannix, PhD

The Medical/Psychiatric Inpatient Program serves a diverse population of children and adolescents struggling with co-occurring psychiatric and medical illness requiring inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Patients come from all areas of the country for treatment. Treatment may address concerns related to eating disorders, somatoform disorders, gastrointestinal illnesses, diabetes, seizures, pain syndromes, and complex presentations needing diagnostic clarification. This 16-bed unit in Hasbro Children’s Hospital is staffed by pediatricians, psychologists, psychiatrists, and other health professionals who collaborate to provide acute psychiatric and medical care. This includes multidisciplinary assessments leading to individualized care plans, individual therapy, family therapy, daily group therapy, community meetings, and milieu therapy. Trainees will spend two months gaining exposure to all elements of the program by serving as a clinician for cases in the program. Patients on the Medical/Psychiatric Inpatient Program often step down to the Partial Hospitalization (day treatment) Program.

The Pediatric Consultation/Liaison experience entails two months of participation with the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry team consulting to Hasbro Children's Hospital's medical inpatient floors. The team consists of both psychiatry and psychology trainees.  Common referral questions include pain complaints, eating disorders, adjustment to chronic illness, problems with adherence to medical regimens, and suicidality. Patients with known developmental disorders are often followed by the CL service.  Since this service provides care to all of Hasbro Children's Hospital, families are ethnically diverse from a wide variety of cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Residents and fellows are expected to serve as the primary clinician on new consultations and to provide follow-up care as indicated. More specifically, residents and fellows will: evaluate medically ill children for co-morbid mental health disorders that may be playing a role in their medical presentation and treatment; provide evaluation and disposition planning of pediatric patients medically admitted in the wake of suicidal or self-injurious behaviors; develop behavioral plans for patients who are having difficulty coping with their illness or participating in their care; provide short-term psychological treatment and psychoeducation to patients and their families; work closely with medical, nursing, social work, child life, and PT/OT staff to coordinate care, especially behavioral treatments to medically hospitalized children; provide psychoeducation to staff members and families to help them provide developmentally and psychologically appropriate care to minimize the patient's distress or discomfort and prevent or limit iatrogenic trauma to patients and their families; and participate in twice-weekly team rounds. 

Partial Hospitalization Care Rotation
Faculty Supervisors: Rebecca Laptook, PhD, Holly Manning, PhD, Katherine Reynolds, PhD, Jack Nassau, PhD, Matt Willis, MD & Julie Thayer, PsyD

The Partial Hospitalization Care rotation uses the Hasbro Children’s Partial Hospital Program setting to provide intensive training in interventions for youth with co-occurring pediatric illness and psychiatric conditions in a day treatment model. The purpose of this rotation is to help the trainee develop competence in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families with complicated medical, emotional, and behavioral presentations. 

The Hasbro Children’s Partial Hospital Program (HCPHP) uses a family systems oriented, day hospital format to treat children with a wide range of pediatric illnesses that have been refractory to standard treatment. The children treated at the HCPHP have either a medical illness complicated by psychological factors (e.g., diabetes with treatment non-adherence), a psychiatric illness complicated by physical factors (e.g., a restrictive eating disorder with cardiac involvement), or both. Children treated range in age from 6 to 18 years and attend the program five days a week, 8 hours a day, for a median length of stay of 17 days. The HCPHP has a multidisciplinary staff, including psychologists, pediatricians, child psychiatrists, pediatric nurses, nutritionists, teachers, and milieu therapists. Residents participate fully as members of the multidisciplinary treatment team and have close collaboration with colleagues from all disciplines during their training. Trainees will learn how to assess individual, family and academic needs of patients and how to develop interventions within an interdisciplinary framework. Since the program has a strong family intervention focus, residents observe and participate in family systems therapy.

Clinic-Based Consultation and Integrated Care Rotation
Faculty Supervisors: Heather Pelletier, PhD, Julie Boergers, PhD, Janet Anderson, EdD

The Clinic-Based Consultation and Integrated Care Rotation gives trainees exposure to the practice of pediatric psychology consultation in multiple settings and with a variety of patient populations. Trainees participate in four half-day clinics. The purpose of this rotation is to help trainees develop competence in the provision of outpatient care and familiarize with models of psychologist involvement in integrated care settings.

The Pediatric GI Disorders Rotation is a multidisciplinary clinical program for children with GI-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s, colitis), recurrent abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome, encopresis, and feeding difficulties.  The Pediatric GI Disorders Rotation is organized through the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology. Residents participate in the evaluation and treatment of GI-related disorders with a diverse population, including the opportunity to work with younger patients (ages 2-5), patients with developmental delays, and low SES families.

The Pediatric Sleep Disorders Clinic is a multidisciplinary program providing comprehensive assessment and family-based, culturally tailored treatment of child and adolescent sleep problems.  The clinic serves a population that is racially, ethnically, and socio-economically diverse.  Comorbid conditions, including neurodevelopmental disorders and obesity, are common.  Trainees have an opportunity to work with video or in-person interpreters.  Typical presenting problems include bedtime refusal, insomnia, difficulty maintaining sleep, delayed sleep phase, sleepwalking, sleep terrors, nighttime fears, excessive daytime sleepiness, and snoring/breathing difficulties.  Trainees conduct both initial evaluations and follow-up visits for patients with sleep disorders.

The Pediatric Cardiology Rotation entails providing integrated behavioral health services in Hasbro’s Pediatric Heart Center. Common referral questions are wide-ranging and include individual and familial adjustment to chronic illness, preparation for medical procedures, transition to increased responsibility for medical care in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, behavioral factors contributing to postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), and complaints of cardiac symptoms without cardiac origin (i.e. often co-occurring with depression or anxiety). There is some opportunity for trainees to tailor cases to their interest.  Trainees on the rotation will communicate with an interdisciplinary treatment team that includes the disciplines of cardiology, nursing, exercise physiology, diagnostic imaging, psychology, and social work. Treatment provided is typically CBT-based individual and family therapy. Trainees conduct both initial evaluations and follow-up visits independently and/or using a co-therapy model with supervisor.

Pediatric Psychology Supplemental Rotations 

Pediatric GI Disorders
Faculty Supervisor: Heather Pelletier, PhD

The Pediatric GI Disorders Rotation is a multidisciplinary clinical program for children with GI-related disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s, colitis), recurrent abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome, encopresis, and feeding difficulties. The Pediatric GI Disorders Rotation is organized through the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology. Residents participate in the evaluation and treatment of GI-related disorders with a diverse population, including the opportunity to work with younger patients (ages 2-5), patients with developmental delays, and low SES families.

Feeding Disorders Clinic
Faculty Supervisor: Sarah Hagin, PhD

The Pediatric Feeding Disorders rotation is a unique interdisciplinary outpatient clinical program for children with significant nutritional and feeding disorders associated with chronic illness or disability. The Feeding Disorders program is organized through the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and involves the disciplines of Pediatric GI, Nutrition, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Speech Pathology, and Pediatric Psychology. Psychology trainees will participate as members of this interdisciplinary team, conducting evaluations and cotreating children and families with a family-oriented and behaviorally based approach to treatment. The Pediatric Feeding Disorders team serves a highly diverse population, including patients from a wide variety of racial and ethnic groups, ages (0-8), and diagnoses (e.g., developmental delays, ASD). Trainees will also have the opportunity to work with interpreters on a regular basis.

Oncology Service
Faculty Supervisor: Margaret Mannix, PhD 

The Pediatric Hem/Onc Rotation is a multidisciplinary clinical program for children with cancer or hematological disorders and their families. Psychology trainees provide evaluation and treatment and consult to members of the multidisciplinary team (pediatric hematologists/oncologists, social workers, nurses, child life specialists, rehabilitation therapists). Since this service provides care to all of pediatric oncology patients at Hasbro Children's Hospital, families are ethnically diverse from a wide variety of cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Common referral concerns include adjustment to diagnosis, pain management, difficulty with procedures or treatment regimens, anxiety, depression, and bereavement. Oncology patients with pre-morbid developmental disorders will be referred to clinicians on this service. Depending on their medical status and the needs of the family, patients are seen during inpatient stays, during outpatient visits to the Tomorrow Fund Clinic, or during outpatient visits at the Psychology Clinic. Opportunities also exist for group therapy, didactic presentations to families, and consultation to schools.

Pediatric Sleep Disorders Clinic
Faculty Supervisor: Julie Boergers, PhD

Sleep Clinic is a multidisciplinary program providing comprehensive assessment and family-based, culturally tailored treatment of child and adolescent sleep problems.  The clinic serves a population that is racially, ethnically, and socio-economically diverse.  Comorbid conditions, including neurodevelopmental disorders and obesity, are common.  Trainees have an opportunity to work with video or in-person interpreters.  Typical presenting problems include bedtime refusal, insomnia, difficulty maintaining sleep, delayed sleep phase, sleepwalking, sleep terrors, nighttime fears, excessive daytime sleepiness, and snoring/breathing difficulties.  Trainees conduct both initial evaluations and follow-up visits for patients with sleep disorders.

SibLink Group
Faculty Supervisors: Wendy Plante, PhD

The Pediatric Sibling Group Rotation is part of SibLink, a clinical and research program that addresses the needs of siblings of children with chronic medical, neurodevelopmental, and behavioral disorders. This is an opportunity for residents to learn about chronic illness from another child’s eye, to learn a model for integrating clinical service and research, and to conduct manualized group treatments for children. Groups are organized for siblings 4-7 and 8-13 years old and are designed to foster sibs’ understanding of and positive adaptation to their brothers’ and sisters’ conditions. Trainees conduct intake and follow-up evaluations and serve as leaders of sibling groups. 

Pediatric Cardiology Clinic
Faculty Supervisors: Janet Anderson, EdD

The Pediatric Cardiology Rotation entails providing integrated behavioral health services in Hasbro’s Pediatric Heart Center. Common referral questions are wide-ranging and include individual and familial adjustment to chronic illness, preparation for medical procedures, transition to increased responsibility for medical care in children and adolescents with congenital heart disease, behavioral factors contributing to postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), and complaints of cardiac symptoms without cardiac origin (i.e. often co-occurring with depression or anxiety). There is some opportunity for trainees to tailor cases to their interest. Trainees on the rotation will communicate with an interdisciplinary treatment team that includes the disciplines of cardiology, nursing, exercise physiology, diagnostic imaging, psychology, and social work. Treatment provided is typically CBT-based individual and family therapy. Trainees conduct both initial evaluations and follow-up visits independently and/or using a co-therapy model with supervisor.

Trainees in the Pediatric Psychology may choose Supplemental Rotations from the Pediatric Psychology and/or Clinical Child Psychology Specialty options.

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Faculty

Juvenile Justice/Behavioral Health 

Two clinical psychology residents may specialize in either adolescent substance use or forensic mental health with the Juvenile Justice/Behavioral Health. Each clinical psychology resident completes two 8-month primary rotations followed by two 4-month primary rotations within clinical programs affiliated with Rhode Island and Bradley Hospitals. Specifically, the clinical psychology resident will complete a combination of rotations at the Rhode Island Family Court Mental Health Clinic, Adolescent Substance Use Program, and Rhode Island Training School. Training emphasis is on the necessary integration of substance use and mental health assessment and treatment for youth who are justice-involved or at-risk for justice involvement and thereby exponentially at-risk for poor long-term behavioral health outcomes.  All experiences will emphasize interdisciplinary collaborations in providing integrated behavioral health assessment and treatment and inter professional learning across multiple disciplines, including, but not limited to, psychology, medicine, nursing, juvenile justice and social work. The clinical psychology resident participates in the following primary rotations: Rhode Island Training School Rotation, Rhode Island Family Court Mental Health Clinic Rotation, and Adolescent Substance Use Program Rotation.

All of the Juvenile Justice/Behavioral Health rotations serve a diverse population. A majority of youth are racial/ethnic minorities, with a large representation of Latino families. Trainees will have exposure to working with interpreters. In addition, the range of diagnostic presentations are also diverse including trauma-related disorders, substance use, anxiety, depression, developmental disorders, and behavioral disorders.

Adolescent Substance Use focus – Primary Rotations

The clinical psychology resident will complete three primary rotations for varied periods of time from 4- to 12-months (See below for specific durations).  The clinical psychology resident who focuses on adolescent substance use within the Juvenile Justice/Behavioral Health Specialty spends the time on each primary rotation to provide an in-depth experience specific to substance use.

Adolescent Substance Use Rotation (8-months: 3 half days; 4-months: 2 half days)
Faculty Supervisor(s): Robert Miranda, Jr. PhD, Elisabeth Frazier, PhD
This rotation provides training in empirically supported assessment and treatment of adolescent substance use disorders in an intensive outpatient setting and a step-down outpatient level of care.   Youth may be court-involved, school-referred, or privately referred.  This rotation provides training and exposure to individual, group, and family-based substance abuse treatment.  The multidisciplinary team is comprised of psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, licensed mental health clinicians, and milieu staff. Clinical psychology residents will have opportunities to assess adolescents with recent substance use who present with a range of co-occurring issues (including suicidality, non-suicidal self-injury, and behavior problems). Residents are responsible for conducting an initial diagnostic assessment and conducting evidence-based (motivational enhancement, cognitive-behavioral) individual, group, and family-based treatment in an intensive outpatient setting and step-down level of care. Co-therapy may also occur. Clinical psychology residents will participate in and receive supervision (individual and group) in all aspects of the substance use treatment services.

Rhode Island Training School (Juvenile Detention) Rotation (8-months 1 full day and 2 half days; 4-months 2 full days and 2 half days)
Faculty Supervisor(s): Elisabeth Frazier, PhD, Dawn Nero, PhD, and Elizabeth Lowenhaupt, MD
In the Juvenile Detention rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in assessment, treatment, and consultation with detained (pre-adjudicated) and incarcerated (post-adjudicated) youth who have serious emotional, behavioral, and developmental challenges. The youth (ranging in age from 12-19 years old) reside in the Rhode Island Training School, the state’s sole juvenile detention facility, in two separate facilities (one for detention and one for post-adjudicated youth).  The emphasis of training is on learning and implementing evidence-based substance use and dual diagnosis individual, group, and family-based treatment, as well as learning and conducting evidence-based forensic substance abuse and dual diagnosis assessment for juvenile detainees.  

Clinical psychology residents may also serve as consultants to the RI Training School staff as assessments are submitted and interventions are implemented. Clinical psychology residents will participate in and receive supervision (individual and group) in all aspects of the juvenile detention services. Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with multidisciplinary treatment teams that include psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, juvenile program workers, probation officers, child welfare case workers, judges, correctional administrators, and special education teachers.

RIFC Mental Health Clinic Rotation (4-months; 2 full days and 2 half days)
Faculty Supervisor(s): Kathleen Kemp, PhD
In the Mental Health Clinic rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in forensic mental health and substance use assessment of children and adolescents with open status or delinquency petitions, including some proportion of juvenile drug court offenders. The court clinic population includes juveniles court-ordered by Rhode Island Family Court (RIFC) judges to receive a comprehensive mental health, trauma-focused, and/or dual diagnosis evaluation.  In addition to conducting comprehensive mental health evaluations (that include both juvenile and caregiver), trainees may also have the experience of performing emergency (acute risk) assessments, as well as participating in consultations to the bench.   The emphasis of training is on learning procedures of evidence-based forensic mental health and dual diagnosis assessment and writing forensic behavioral health reports, as well as providing testimony related to submitted forensic reports and clinical consultations. There may also be some opportunities to provide treatment services in the outpatient court clinic setting. Clinical psychology residents will participate in and receive supervision in all aspects of the juvenile court clinic services.  Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with a multidisciplinary treatment team that includes case managers, social workers, psychologists, judges, probation, and child welfare workers.  

Forensic Mental Health focus – Primary Rotations

The clinical psychology resident will complete three primary rotations for varied periods of time from 4- to 12-months (See below for specific durations).   The clinical psychology resident who focuses on forensic mental health within the Juvenile Justice/Behavioral Health Specialty spends the time on each primary rotation to provide an in-depth experience on that rotation.

RIFC Mental Health Clinic Rotation (8-months; 1 full day and 2 half days)
Faculty Supervisor(s): Kathleen Kemp, PhD
In the Mental Health Clinic rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in forensic mental health and substance use assessment of children and adolescents with open status or delinquency petitions, including some proportion of juvenile drug court offenders. The court clinic population includes juveniles court-ordered by Rhode Island Family Court (RIFC) judges to receive a comprehensive mental health, trauma-focused, and/or dual diagnosis evaluation.  In addition to conducting comprehensive mental health evaluations (that include both juvenile and caregiver), trainees may also have the experience of performing emergency (acute risk) assessments, as well as participating in consultations to the bench.   The emphasis of training is on learning procedures of evidence-based forensic mental health and dual diagnosis assessment and writing forensic behavioral health reports, as well as providing testimony related to submitted forensic reports and clinical consultations. There may also be some opportunities to provide treatment services in the outpatient court clinic setting. Clinical psychology residents will participate in and receive supervision in all aspects of the juvenile court clinic services.  Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with a multidisciplinary treatment team that includes case managers, social workers, psychologists, judges, probation, and child welfare workers.  

Rhode Island Training School (Juvenile Detention) Rotation (8-months 1 full day and 2 half days; 4-months 1 full day and 3 half days)
Faculty Supervisor(s): Elisabeth Frazier, PhD, Dawn Nero, PhD, and Elizabeth Lowenhaupt, MD
In the Juvenile Detention rotation, the clinical psychology resident has the opportunity to develop competency in assessment, treatment, and consultation with detained (pre-adjudicated) and incarcerated (post-adjudicated) youth who have serious emotional, behavioral, and developmental challenges. The youth (ranging in age from 12-19 years old) reside in the Rhode Island Training School, the state’s sole juvenile detention facility, in two separate facilities (one for detention and one for post-adjudicated youth).  The emphasis of training is on learning and implementing evidence-based substance use and dual diagnosis individual, group, and family-based treatment, as well as learning and conducting evidence-based forensic substance abuse and dual diagnosis assessment for juvenile detainees.   

Clinical psychology residents may also serve as consultants to the RI Training School staff as assessments are submitted and interventions are implemented. Clinical psychology residents will participate in and receive supervision (individual and group) in all aspects of the juvenile detention services. Clinical psychology residents gain experience working collaboratively with multidisciplinary treatment teams that include psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, juvenile program workers, probation officers, child welfare case workers, judges, correctional administrators, and special education teachers.

Adolescent Substance Use Rotation (4-months: 3 half days)
Faculty Supervisor(s): Robert Miranda, Jr., PhD & Elisabeth Frazier,  PhD
This rotation provides training in empirically supported assessment and treatment of adolescent substance use disorders in an intensive outpatient setting and a step-down outpatient level of care.  Youth may be court-involved, school-referred, or privately referred.  This rotation provides training and exposure to individual, group, and family-based substance abuse treatment.  The multidisciplinary team is comprised of psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, licensed mental health clinicians, and caseworkers.  Clinical psychology residents will have opportunities to assess adolescents with recent substance use who present with a range of co-occurring issues (including suicidality, non-suicidal self-injury, and behavior problems). Residents are responsible for conducting an initial diagnostic assessment and conducting evidence-based (motivational enhancement, cognitive-behavioral) individual, group, and family-based treatment in an intensive outpatient setting and step-down level of care. Co-therapy may also occur. Clinical psychology residents will participate in and receive supervision (individual and group) in all aspects of the substance use treatment services.

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