Speakers

Katherine Goldman, Staff

Kathrine Goldman holds a B.A. in Political Science and Modern Languages from Union College and an M.A. in Spanish American Literature from Rutgers University. She is currently the manager of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Prior to joining the Center, she worked as a translator, editor and teacher in the United States and Chile. Goldman is on the board of the Cultural Organization for the Arts, a non-profit that brings arts programs to public schools and volunteers as an interpreter for asylum seekers through the CARA Pro Bono Project and other organizations.

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, Faculty

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Brown University and an affiliated faculty with the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, IL. 

Clara Elizabeth Goodale, class of 1939

Clara Elizabeth Goodale graduated from Pembroke College in 1939 with an A.B. in European History. She then attended a secretarial school in Worcester, Massachusetts, to learn typing and shorthand. She worked as Secretary to President Wriston for 7 years before marrying her husband – a Brown graduate. Coming from a family of several Pembrokers, Goodale was active as an alumna and was elected President of the Alumnae Association. She later became the first female alumna trustee of Brown’s Corporation in 1965. She passed away on December 10, 2010.

Arlene Elizabeth Gorton, class of 1952 - First Interview

Arlene Gorton graduated from Pembroke College in 1952 with an A.B. in English literature. While at Pembroke she played softball and badminton, captaining the softball team her senior year and ranking as the top singles badminton player. After graduating, Gorton went to the University of North Carolina for two years, before returning to New England where she taught at Connecticut College for seven years. In 1961, she returned to Pembroke as the Director of Physical Education and as a professor in the Physical Education department.

Arlene Elizabeth Gorton, Faculty - Second Interview

Arlene Gorton graduated from Pembroke College in 1952 with an A.B. in English literature. While at Pembroke she played softball and badminton, captaining the softball team her senior year and ranking as the top singles badminton player. After graduating, Gorton went to the University of North Carolina for two years, before returning to New England where she taught at Connecticut College for seven years. In 1961, she returned to Pembroke as the Director of Physical Education and as a professor in the Physical Education department.

Rae Gould, Staff

Dr. Rae Gould joined the Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative at Brown University in 2019 as Associate Director. Her primary responsibilities include oversight of developing an undergraduate concentration in Native American and Indigenous Studies, programming to support and supplement academic developments, and tribal outreach.

Maria Manuela Goyanes, class of 2001

Maria Manuela Goyanes (she/her/hers) is the Artistic Director of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company (Woolly). Prior to joining Woolly, she served as the Director of Producing and Artistic Planning at The Public Theater. During her tenure there, Goyanes oversaw the day-to-day execution of a full slate of plays and musicals at the Public’s five-theater venue at Astor Place and the Delacorte Theater for Shakespeare in the Park.

Susan E. Graber, class of 1971

Susan E. Graber grew up in a suburb on Long Island, New York with her parents and older brother. Knowing she wanted to major in science, she chose to attend Pembroke College, as a coordinate college that offered the benefits of a big university science education with the comfort and security of a small female college. Following graduation, she received a graduate degree in physics from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton. She worked at Bell Laboratory doing applied research and development. Graber is married and has three children.

Edna Frances Graham, class of 1950

Edna Frances Graham was born in Providence, Rhode Island. She graduated from Classical High School before pursuing French studies at Pembroke College. She taught in Rhode Island immediately after graduation, then went to Venezuala where she worked for an oil company. In 1987 Graham earned a master’s degree in Conservation from the University of Rhode Island. She served as a charter member of the East Providence Historical Society, founding and organizing the Hunt House Museum as well as Rumford Antiques on Cape Cod.

Deborah J. Greenberg, class of 1979

The daughter of a Fulbright Professor, Deborah J. Greenberg was born in Chicago, began travelling the world from a young age, and lived in Mexico and Italy. She attended the University of Chicago for one year and then transferred to Brown University where she was involved in theatre and dance, and majored in semiotics. After graduating in 1979, Greenberg lived in Providence for a year before moving to New York to pursue acting. While in New York she had a small part in “All My Children,” then went on to work in the public affairs department at the Guggenheim Museum.

Shibei Guo, class of 2020

Shibei Guo grew up in Wuhan, China. She attended high school in Singapore before beginning her college education at New York University. After her first year at NYU, Guo transferred to Brown University where she concentrated in applied math, computer science, and economics. She graduated in 2020 during the COVID-19 global pandemic.  

Nicole Kathleen Harrison, class of 1992

Nicole “Nikki Strong” Harrison was born and raised in Spanish Harlem in New York City. She attended the Chapin School in New York through the A Better Chance Program. During her time in high school, Harrison was an avid dancer and actor, which she then went on to pursue at Brown University. After completing her degree from the Department of Theater, Speech, and Dance, in 1992, she began her wide-ranging career as educator, activist, and radio personality.

Penelope Claire Hartland, class of 1940

Penelope Claire Hartland was born on June 17, 1918 in Fiona, Massachusetts and graduated from Pembroke College in 1940. As a student in Pembroke College, she studied Economics, served as President of the Student Government Association, and was Editor of the school newspaper, The Pembroke Record. She went on to receive her Ph.D. in economics from Radcliffe. In 1946, she returned to Brown as one of the school's first female professors, but left the University after learning that she would not be promoted to associate professor.

Anna Peña Hass, class of 1917

Anna Peña Hass was born in Providence, RI, but moved to Massachusetts at a young age. Engaged at the end of high school, and wishing to be married, Hass was persuaded by her mother to attend Pembroke for a few years before moving to Cuba with her husband. Upon leaving college, Anna slowly became involved with the Communist Party. She was eventually arrested and tried by the Supreme Court. The case resolved itself by 1957. Hass continued her political protesting, but eventually resigned to a quieter life running a bookstore. 

Dorothy Ann Haus, class of 1964

Dorothy Haus was born and raised in Brattleboro, Vermont. Her father was an uneducated millionaire and her mother was a Pembroke College graduate (class of 1922). It was expected that she and her siblings would attend college. Haus decided on Pembroke after she saw the campus and started in the fall of 1958. Her father died during her freshman year and when her mother died during her junior year, she moved back to Vermont to take care of her family. During that time, Haus met her husband, a Providence College graduate, and they married in 1963.

Katherine May Hazard, class of 1933

Katherine May Hazard was born in 1911 in Edgewood, Rhode Island, to John and Ethel Hazard. She attended a public high school in Cranston, Rhode Island, before moving on to Pembroke College, where she studied mathematics. At Pembroke, she participated in Industrial Group, Class Fistball, Math Group, and Handbook Committee. After college, she worked for the Works Progress Administration before settling down to teach math at the elementary and junior high school level. Hazard passed away on August 1, 1991. 

Candace Heald, class of 1974

Since 2007, Candace Lee Heald has served as the Director of AHA! New Bedford’s 2nd Thursday FREE Art and Culture Night. AHA! is the longest continuously funded grant for place-making and the creative economy from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and continues to have one of the best returns on financial investment in the Commonwealth. Heald was one of the authors for the original AHA! grant in 1999 and has been on the Steering Committee from the beginning as Program Chair or Steering Committee Chair until she was hired as staff.

Annalisa Heppner, staff

Annalisa Heppner, MA, is the Project Manager for the Circumpolar Laboratory Inventory Project at the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology at Brown University. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Tennessee and her master's degree from the University of Alaska Anchorage. She has been an archaeologist for over a decade, with experience all over the USA, but especially in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Heppner is passionate about the role of Indigenous people in archaeology and museum management.

Dorothy Allen Hill, class of 1930

Dorothy Allen Hill received her both a Bachelor’s degree (1930) and a Master’s degree (1958) in English from Brown University. She taught English at East Providence High School, then worked at Brown University’s John Hay Library from 1965-1974. She volunteered at the Providence Athenaeum and was active in the Handicraft Club of Providence. She lived in Rumford, Rhode Island for many years, and summered in Charlestown, Rhode Island. Hill died on April 1, 2005.

Helen Anderson Hoff, class of 1923

Helen Anderson Hoff grew up in a small town between New Brunswick and Princeton, New Jersey. She was the eldest of ten children and came from an old New Jersey agricultural family. She attended elementary school in a one-room schoolhouse and then commuted by train to high school, where the school superintendent convinced her to apply to college. Hoff began Pembroke in 1919, the first from her town to go to college. At Pembroke College, she studied European History. After marrying in 1928, she obtained a Master's degree in American History from Ohio State University.