Global News Digest

2016-2017 Heimark Artist in Residence: Black Spatial Relics

Thursday, October 06, 2016

The 2016-2017 Heimark Artist in Residence is pleased to announce the Black Spatial Relics (BSR) program.  The BSR residency supports the development of two new performance works that address and incorporate the public history of slavery and contemporary issues of justice. The 2016-2017 Black Spatial Relics artists-in-residence are ChE Ware and Jaymes Jorsling.

Georgetown joins Brown, U-Va. and others in looking anew at slavery

Tuesday, September 06, 2016

Georgetown University’s attempt to understand and atone for its deep involvement with slavery links the Jesuit school with a line of others that have undertaken similar journeys in the past decade to uncover painful episodes of their history.

The rising influence of the Black Lives Matter movement in higher education in the past two years has brought new urgency to questions about slavery and its connections to colleges founded in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Mémorial de l'Esclavage de Brown University (Providence, USA) par Martin Puryear

Monday, August 15, 2016

Le monument de granit, fonte de bronze et acier a été créé par le grand sculpteur afro américain Martin Puryear et inauguré par l'Université Brown de Providence (Rhode Island) en septembre 2014.

Il atteste les liens que l'université entretient avec l'histoire de la traite transatlantique et le labeur des Africains et des Afro-Américains, réduits en esclavage ou libres, qui ont contribué à construire l'université, l'état de Rhode Island et la nation américaine.

Many Colleges Profited From Slavery. What Can They Do About It Now?

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

"Lke many campuses, Georgetown University is scrutinizing its historical ties to slavery. But unlike most, it’s going beyond plaques and apologies — actually tracking down the descendants of slaves it sold in the early 19th century to keep its doors open."

The Black Radical Tradition: Freedom, Emancipation, and the Question of the Human

Saturday, April 16, 2016

An interview with Anthony Bogues, Asa Messer Professor of Humanities and Critical Theory, Professor of Africana Studies, and Director of the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice at Brown University. He visited Pitt during the Year of Humanities to give a lecture titled "The Black Radical Tradition: Freedom, Emancipation, and the Question of the Human." This interview focuses on his life and work, and the relationship of his work to the broader public.

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