The Khipu Model: An Indigenous Political Theory and Research Methods

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Thursday, March 15, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Alumnae Hall, Crystal Room

A Talk by Mariaelena Huambachano

Indigenous peoples have distinctive forms of constructing, validating, and acquiring knowledge. Based on this understanding, Mariaelena Huambachano developed an Indigenous research-based framework, the “Khipu Model.” Andean communities kept records and told stories through the colorful, knotted string devices known as Khipus, and Huambachano adapted the Khipu to “hear, record and elucidate” Quechua and Māori knowledge systems. Learn how her framework gives “voice” to and represents Indigenous ways of knowing and being at every stage of empirical research, and how the “Khipu Model” articulates an Indigenous Political Theory of self-determination, decolonization of methodologies, and social justice.

Mariaelena Huambachano is an interdisciplinary Indigenous scholar at Brown University whose work centers on the intersections of Indigenous studies, public policy, and environmental and sustainable development, with a particular focus on comparative and transnational Indigenous knowledge systems of North America, Oceania, and Latin America. Through her “Right to Food Security/Sovereignty” project, Huambachano works with Indigenous farming communities such as Wai Ariki Onerahi (Food Forest) and Women of Choquecancha, and utilizes a Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) theory and community-based research to understand the role of Indigenous knowledge systems to improve food security and environmental policies. 

 Join interdisciplinary scholar Mariaelena Huambachano (Brown University) as she shares her research framework, the Khipu Model. Learn how this model gives voice to and represents Indigenous ways of knowing and being, and articulates an Indigenous Political Theory of self-determination, decolonization of methodologies, and social justice. 

This event is free and open to the public, followed by a reception in Manning Hall. 

Supported by the Friends of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology.