Fort Apache: Conflict, Conservation, and (Re)Conciliation(?) in Indian Country

Add event to my Google calendar Add event to my Google calendar Share this event on facebook E-mail this event
Thursday, April 05, 2018 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Smith-Buonanno, Room 106

A Talk by John R. Welch

Over the last few hundred years, the Fort Apache and Theodore Roosevelt School National Historic Landmark have been different places for different people—homeland, military post, boarding school, tribal cultural center. The core question is whether and how the colonial outpost most responsible for Apache subjugation can be returned to active duty in support of White Mountain Apache Tribe sovereignty, community, and prosperity. Join archaeologist-preservationist John R. Welch in writing the next chapter on the history of this internationally recognized historic site in the heart of Apacheland.

John R. Welch is a professor, jointly appointed in the Department of Archaeology and the School of Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. Welch works with indigenous communities on projects at the interface of indigenous peoples’ sovereignty—rights and responsibilities derived from authority over people and territory—and stewardship—sustainable and broadly beneficial uses of cultural and biophysical inheritances. Welch is a founding member of the board of the Fort Apache Heritage Foundation. He publishes on Apache history and applied archaeology and directs SFU Archaeology’s online Professional Graduate Program in Heritage Resource Management.

Join archaeologist-preservationist John R. Welch (Simon Fraser University) in examining if and how the colonial outpost most responsible for Apache subjugation, Fort Apache, and Theodore Roosevelt School National Historic Landmark, can be returned to active duty in support of White Mountain Apache Tribe sovereignty, community, and prosperity.

This event is free and open to the public, followed by a reception at the same location. 

Supported by Friends of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, generous donors to the Shepard Krech III Lecture Fund, the Joukowsky Institute of Archaeology and the Ancient World, and the Native American and Indigenous Studies at Brown program.