Gender and Sexuality Studies Courses

Please visit Brown's online course catalog for a complete listing of all classes offered.

Fall Semester 2019

Code Title Schedule Instructor
GNSS0120
Intro to Gender 
& Sexuality Studies

M W F        1-1:50
D. Davis
Explores the interdisciplinary fields of Gender and Sexuality Studies, considering the relation between formations of gender and those of sexuality across a range of historical and disciplinary contexts. Considers how both sexuality and gender are shaped in relation to race and ethnicity, economic inequality, and the postcolonial legacy.
GNSS1520 Latin American Horror W 3-5:30 J. Lehnen
Latin American horror film is often overlooked within the world of film studies. This course will delve into the dark and intriguing world of the Latin American horror film genre. We will study Latin American horror cinema considering works across time periods, national contexts, and directors. This course will ask the following questions: How does the genre express individual and national anxieties in the cultural, social, political and economic realms? To what degree does horror film serve as a social barometer that explores, negotiates, and at times reifies social anxieties about difference, identity, sexuality, normativity, repression, technology, the environment, etc.?
GNSS1720 Technologies of/and the Body: Mediated Visions T 4-6:30 G. Koch
The relationship between body and machinery, technology and biology is often thought in terms of the mechanical doll, the animated robot and other hybrid figures. Science fiction films for example offer double visions of the gendered body: women are masters/slaves of the technology and still symbolic bodies of biological surviving of the human species. We will explore mediated visions in films and other media of different kinds spanning a bridge between SciFi-films and performance art. We will also study theoretical texts (Donna Haraway et al.) on the problem of the merging of technology and body.
GNSS1810 Independent Study & Research N/A Various
Independent reading and research for upper-level students under the direction of a faculty member. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
GNSS1961N Scenes of Instruction: Pedagogy, Punishment, Perversion M 5:30-8 D. Zechner
This course investigates the interrelation between pedagogy, sexuality, and violence. It seeks to investigate the classroom as a site of violent interaction and a potentially sexualized space. Appraising the erotic dimension of the production and transmission of knowledge, the course will critically trace a discourse of the utmost actuality and relevance: from campus rape culture, via the prominent question of consent, through current debates around Title IX, the connection between learning and sex marks a highly problematic dimension of our academic environments deserving of scholarly attentiveness and critical scrutiny. 
GNSS1970 Directed Research & Thesis N/A Various
Independent research under the direction of a faculty member, leading to a thesis. Required of honors candidates. Open to seniors only. Instructor permission required. 
GNSS1990 GNSS Senior Seminar W 3-5:30 J. Lehnen
A research seminar focusing on the research and writing of the participants. Required of senior concentrators; open to other advanced students by permission.
GNSS2010M The Question of Critique
W 10-12:30 S. Stewart-Steinberg
This course will explore the spaces and times of the work of critique. A return to the question is timely, for over the past two decades and in a broad range of disciplines we have witnessed what may be described as a sense of exhaustion or fatigue with “theory” and other forms of critical work. The course will ask what it means to speak of “limits” of critique: can critique be limited, and if so: how and why? It will also ask about the political impact and stakes of critique in our contemporary moment. 
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Spring Semester 2020

Code TITLE SCHEDULE INSTRUCTOR
GNSS1510 Transnational Sexualities W 3-5:30 A. Zengin
The goal of this course is to explore the formation of both normative and non-normative sexualities within the intertwinement of local, national and global social contexts. Using historical and cross-cultural research on gender and sexuality, the course will explore how social forces such as global capitalism, citizenship, nationalism, human rights, securitization, neoliberalism, settle colonialism, tourism, mass media and migration shape and produce desires, sexual identities, sexual labor, sexual practices, bodies and genders. 
GNSS1711 Speech and Silence, Trust and Fear: A Feminist Philosophical Inquiry into Sex Equality tbd P. Foa
This seminar examines problems that arise in marriage from the failures of couples to speak to each other, and when they do, from their failures to speak openly, honestly, and from a position of social equality. We examine from a metaphysical and moral perspective the agency in men and women as it is reflected in what couples say and think. We look at whether marriages fail when women consciously choose or unconsciously fall into oppressive, subordinate postures and examine whether men take advantage of these postures. Class materials will be primarily novels and films, supplemented with philosophical, sociological, and legal essays.
GNSS1820 Independent Study & Research N/A Various
Independent reading and research for upper-level students under the direction of a faculty member. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. 
GNSS1961O Masquerade as Critique tbd L. Pires
Critique is most often figured as an act that reveals a reality that was previously hidden, as though one were pulling back a curtain or lifting a veil. But, as the critic Craig Owens points out, “in a culture in which visibility is always on the side of the male, invisibility on the side of the female…are not the activities of unveiling, stripping, laying bare…unmistakably male prerogatives”? This seminar develops an alternate genealogy of critique informed by feminist and queer of color perspectives. It eschews the modernist drive toward transparency, instead examining masquerade, mimicry, code-switching, duplicity, fugitivity, passing, and appropriation. 
GNSS1961P Poetics of the World: The Making and Unmaking of the African Diaspora tbd N. Olla
This course critically engages with the meaning and making of African Diaspora literature by examining a range of novels, poetry, and memoirs, as well as theoretical texts. Part of the work of this course will be to examine the genre of Afro-diasporic literature. What does it mean to belong to a diaspora? How do writers from across the diaspora communicate with one another? What unexpected models of sociality and community does this literature produce? How do writers engage with one another across national boundaries? Our discussions will delve into themes of opacity, entanglement, identity, race, gender, and sexuality. 
GNSS1980 Directed Research & Thesis N/A Various
Independent research under the direction of a faculty member, leading to a thesis. Required of honors candidates. Open to seniors only. Instructor permission required.
GNSS2000 Method, Evidence, Critique: Gender and Sexuality Studies across the Disciplines
T 3-5:30                                  
D. Davis                                              
Gender and Sexuality Studies is by its very nature transdisciplinary. Can we speak of a single methodology that ties GNSS together? How might scholars work on gender and/or sexuality while respecting disciplinary boundaries and training? We will start with the premise that studies in gender and sexuality are tied together by critique that questions foundational assumptions and takes account of its own position within a given field of knowledge. By studying canonical theoretical texts alongside disciplinary studies characterized by a feminist and/or queer focus, we will investigate how critique operates and how standards of evidence are marshaled in particular disciplines.
GNSS2020M The Question of Critique
 W 10-12:30 S. Stewart-Steinberg
This course will explore the spaces and times of the work of critique. A return to the question is timely, for over the past two decades and in a broad range of disciplines we have witnessed what may be described as a sense of exhaustion or fatigue with “theory” and other forms of critical work. The course will ask what it means to speak of “limits” of critique: can critique be limited, and if so: how and why? It will also ask about the political impact and stakes of critique in our contemporary moment.
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