Gender and Sexuality Studies Courses

Please visit Brown's online course catalog for a complete listing of all classes offered.

Fall Semester 2020

Code Title Schedule Instructor
GNSS1711
Speech and Silence, Trust, Rage and Fear: An Inquiry into the Possibility of Intimacy

W 3-5:30

P. Foa
Seminar examines intimate relationships: problems that arise from failures of couples to speak to each other, when instead of silence, they fail to speak openly, honestly, from a position of equality -particularly about their feelings, needs and desires. We examine the moral agency of men and women as it is reflected in what couples do, say and think. We look at whether relationships fail when men or women consciously or unconsciously choose women who fall into oppressive, subordinate postures and examine whether men take advantage of these postures. Class material from literature, films, and readings from philosophical, literary, and legal essays.
GNSS1961Q Conversations in Trans/Feminisms: Theories, Cultures, & Politics Th 4-6:30 S. Whitley
This course explores the bridges and tensions between trans* and feminist movements through academic & activist literature/cultural production. How & why did transfeminism as a critical intervention in relation to feminist theory & politics arise, & why are transfeminist discourses & theories fiercely relevant from the 1960s to the present. How does trans*, as an infinite spectrum of categories, theories, & identities rupture, and/or transcend the gender binary? We will explore the that ways can trans* scholars, artists, and organizations contest gendered meanings, borders, & hierarchies within systems of oppression such as anti-blackness, white supremacy, settler colonialism, homophobia, and xenophobia.
GNSS 1990 GNSS Senior Seminar W 3-5:30
J. Lehnen
A research seminar focusing on the research and writing of the participants. Required of senior concentrators; open to other advanced students by permission.
GNSS2000
Method, Evidence, Critique: Gender and Sexuality Studies across the Disciplines T 4-6:30  D. Davis
Gender and Sexuality Studies is by its very nature transdisciplinary. Can we speak of a single methodology that ties GNSS together? How might scholars work on gender and/or sexuality while respecting disciplinary boundaries and training? We will start with the premise that studies in gender and sexuality are tied together by critique that questions foundational assumptions and takes account of its own position within a given field of knowledge. By studying canonical theoretical texts alongside disciplinary studies characterized by a feminist and/or queer focus, we will investigate how critique operates and how standards of evidence are marshaled in particular disciplines.
GNSS2010N Narrating Debt
W 10-12:30 P. Szendy
There have been many approaches to the problem of debt—a problem that has grown more urgent in the light of the central role played by indebtedness in neoliberal, financialized capitalism. There have been global histories of debt, claims for reparations in postcolonial debates, legal arguments about “odious debt,” psychoanalytical readings of debtor characters, inquiries into specific types of debt, critical studies dedicated to gender/race in the micropolitics of debt. The guiding hypothesis of our seminar is that all these approaches, diverse as they may be, presuppose a more fundamental tie between indebtedness and narrativity, or the possibility of narration.
 GNSS X-list Courses of Interest to Concentrators in Gender and Sexuality Studies  Varies  Varies

Spring Semester 2021

Code TITLE SCHEDULE INSTRUCTOR
GNSS2010N
Narrating Debt
 W 10-12:30 P. Szendy
There have been many approaches to the problem of debt—a problem that has grown more urgent in the light of the central role played by indebtedness in neoliberal, financialized capitalism. There have been global histories of debt, claims for reparations in postcolonial debates, legal arguments about “odious debt,” psychoanalytical readings of debtor characters, inquiries into specific types of debt, critical studies dedicated to gender/race in the micropolitics of debt. The guiding hypothesis of our seminar is that all these approaches, diverse as they may be, presuppose a more fundamental tie between indebtedness and narrativity, or the possibility of narration.
GNSS 0090C
Reproductive Health: Science and Politics

S. Fox
Reproductive health issues such as contraception, abortion, sexually transmitted infections and gay and lesbian health are some of the most controversial and politically charged issues in the US today. After an introduction to the interpretation of medical literature we will explore scientific, political, religious and cultural aspects of these important public policy issues. Successful national and international programs will be discussed. Although all views are welcome, it is expected that students will be respectful of other's opinions and will incorporate the best available scientific data into their conclusions.
 
GNSS 0120
Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies

D. Davis
Explores the interdisciplinary fields of Gender and Sexuality Studies, considering the relation between formations of gender and those of sexuality across a range of historical and disciplinary contexts. Considers how both sexuality and gender are shaped in relation to race and ethnicity, economic inequality, and the postcolonial legacy.
GNSS 1961R
Sex and Money: The History of Paris since 1750

H. Frydman
Paris, seen through the rose-tinted glasses of Hollywood, is the city of love. How did this come to be? And what does this image hide? Across the modern period, shopping and women’s work were sexualized, prostitution was normalized, regulated, and made “safe” for bourgeois clients, nude women performed on music hall stages, and gay cultures emerged in new commercial venues. This class will examine how sexual commerce shaped the identity of the city, how the commercial spaces of the city shaped sexual identities, and how discourses about sexuality contributed to the legitimation of capitalism. We will engage with topics ranging from the construction of gender difference and the emergence of mass media, to the relationship between the expansion of global capitalism and the rise of moral panics.
GNSS 1961S
Boom Towns: Finance and Literature in Latin America

N. Sánchez-Rodríguez
 The "boom" of the 1950s and 1960s is the name given to the most well-known and influential literary movement of Latin America's history. Studying the works of authors such as Gabriel García Márquez and Laura Restrepo, this class explores the implications of using this financial metaphor to refer to the cultural production of the region since the nineteenth century. We will examine the relationship between finance and writing through authors' invention and representation of four fictional boom towns. Through these places and their relation to the commodities that made them possible (bananas, fish, and oil), literature in Latin America has sought to give sense to its "peripheral" position within the capitalist world system and challenged common-sense narratives about economic development, progress and social structures. A special emphasis will be made on the role of finance in the reproduction of gender, race, and class inequalities, as well as facilitating extracting enterprises of profound ecological damage.

Summer Semester 2021

CODE TITLE SCHEDULE INSTRUCTOR
GNSS 1070
On Both Sides of the Lens: Latin American Women Filmmakers   J. Lehnen
Working from a selection of both feature films and documentaries, we will discuss how women filmmakers are employing and changing these two film genres. The class will endeavor to highlight the work of women filmmakers, and through the reading of these films, students will gain an understanding of some of the debates in the field of gender and sexuality, and acquire a grounding in some of the key moments of twentieth-century Latin American cinema, social, political and economic history. Additionally, students will acquire key technical knowledge of film form and the analytical apparatus necessary to critically view and debate film.
GNSS 1101
A Gender Perspective on Women and Enterprise

S. Fox
A distinctive pattern of economic inequality marks the female population of every nation, each with the same mechanisms standing behind the disadvantages. Everywhere, the barriers to women’s economic engagement reach beyond work and salary to encompass property ownership, capital, credit, and markets. When considered as a whole, these barriers constitute economic exclusion, not just economic inequality. To date, policy, scholarship, and activism on the economic status of women have tended to focus on inequality in the formal workplace, but the full pattern is much more visible when women-owned businesses are examined.