Departmental Prizes

For Undergraduate Students


Ruth Simmons Prize in Gender and Women's Studies

The Pembroke Center is pleased and honored to offer the Ruth Simmons Prize in Gender and Women’s Studies. The prize is awarded annually for an outstanding honors thesis on questions having to do with women or gender. In the spring, the Pembroke Center invites faculty in all fields to nominate honors theses for the prize. A committee of faculty who teach and write in the area of gender studies will make the selection.

If you wish to make a nomination, please send the following to Box 1958 by 4:00 pm on the current nomination deadline date (April 20, 2018):

  • thesis adviser’s evaluation
  • a copy of the thesis

The Ruth Simmons Prize carries with it an award of $1,000.

Full list of recipients of the Ruth Simmons Prize in Gender and Women's Studies

Congratulations to the 2018 Ruth Simmons Prize recipient

Deborah Pomeranz
Ethnic Studies

 

 

 

"Policing the City: How Discourses of Public Safety Reshaped New York" 

Policing the City explores different forms of policing that emerged in response to moral panics about crime and sexual economies in late 1970s New York City. The city government, civilian patrols, and feminist organizations each had different definitions of and strategies for achieving public safety, but all excluded the most marginalized New Yorkers from their visions of urban citizenship. These discourses of public safety laid the groundwork for New York's turn toward broken windows policing, redevelopment, and profit-oriented city governance in the decades to come. 



Joan Wallach Scott Prize

The Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women annually awards the Joan Wallach Scott Prize for an outstanding honors thesis in Gender and Sexuality Studies. Joan Wallach Scott is the Harold F. Linder Professor of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study. Among her many books are Gender and the Politics of History (1988), Only Paradoxes to Offer: French Feminists and the Rights of Man (1996), Parité: Sexual Equality and the Crisis of French Universalism (2005), and The Politics of the Veil: Banning Islamic Headscarves in French Public Schools (2007). Professor Scott taught at Brown from 1980-1985, where she was Nancy Duke Lewis Professor and Professor of History. She was the founding director of the Pembroke Center.

Each year the Pembroke Center awards this prize for an outstanding thesis by a Gender and Sexuality Studies Concentrator.

Click for a list of all Joan Wallach Scott Prize recipients

Congratulations to the 2018 Joan Wallach Scott Prize recipient 

Zoë Sackman
Gender and Sexuality Studies

 

 

 

"Wicked Witches of the West: Colonial Impulses in 20th Century Neopagan
Theory and Practice" 

Wicked Witches of the West deals with impulses of colonial ideology in 20th century neopagan theory and practice. In my research, I sought to identify and understand the ways in which eclectic neopaganism “borrows” from non-Western cultures and religions in ways that trace pathways of colonialism. By situating these impulses historically, I laid a foundation for developing an ethics of neopaganism which might meaningfully resist these violences.

 

For Graduate Students


Marie J. Langlois Dissertation Prize

The Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women annually awards the Marie J. Langlois Dissertation Prize for an outstanding dissertation in the area of feminist studies. Marie J. Langlois became a trustee emerita of the Corporation in 2007 having previously served as trustee and vice chancellor of the University since 1998.  She served as a member of the Board of Fellows from 1992 to 1998, as a member of the Board of Trustees from 1980 to 1985, and as a trustee and treasurer of the University from 1988 to 1992. She received a bachelor of arts degree from Brown in 1964 and a master of business administration degree from Harvard University in 1967. Ms. Langlois recently retired as managing director of Washington Trust Investors, a division of Washington Trust Company.  She currently serves on the boards of directors of the Rhode Island Foundation, Lifespan, Salve Regina University, Rhode Island Philharmonic and Music School, and Rhode Island Public Radio.

Each year the Pembroke Center awards this prize for a dissertation in areas related to gender studies or feminist analysis. If you wish to nominate a dissertation, please send to Box 1958 by 4:00 pm on the current nomination deadline date (April 20, 2018):

    • A nominating letter including a brief description of the dissertation
    • A letter of support from a second member of the dissertation committee
    • A copy of the dissertation

    The Marie J. Langlois Prize carries with it an award of $1,000.

    Marie J. Langlois Dissertation Prize recipients

    Congratulations to the 2018 Marie J. Langlois Dissertation Prize recipient

    Anne Gray Fischer
    History

     

     


    "Arrestable Behavior: Women, Police Power and the Making of Law-and-Order America, 1930s-1980s"

    Arrestable Behavior is a history of race, sex, and modern American policing between the fall of Prohibition and the rise of "broken windows" policing in the 1980s. Focusing on the highly discretionary, police-driven enforcement of morals misdemeanors, including disorderly conduct, vagrancy, and prostitution—which were primarily deployed against women— "Arrestable Behavior" argues that the changing racial logics of sexual policing were a significant yet understudied driver of the stunning expansion of police power in the late twentieth century. 

     


    Helen Terry MacLeod Prize

    From 1995-2007 the Pembroke Center awarded this prize for an outstanding undergraduate honors thesis that addressed questions of gender or women, or that brought a feminist analysis to bear on a topic of study.

    MacLeod Prize recipients 1995-2007

    In 2007, this award was changed from a prize for a completed honors thesis to a research grant available to support undergraduate honors research. See the grants page for more information.