Events

The events feed in University Theme comes from [email protected].

  • Jan
    21

    Register to join the webinar

    Come hear about exciting humanities research through virtual speed talks by 10 undergraduate, graduate, postdoctoral, and faculty fellows at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. 

    The diverse group of fellows will showcase their research on a broad range of topics including the effects of settler colonialism and capitalism on indigenous cultures as well as the ethics of environmental sciences, the history of intersex activism, and the bioarchaeology of diversity.

    The Zoom webinar will feature Aviva Cormier (Anthropology), David Frank (Philosophy), Gregory Hitch (American Studies), Jennifer Johnson (History), Jennifer Lambe (History), Matthew Marciello (American Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies), Kelly Nguyen (Classics), Gustavo Quintero (Hispanic Studies), Karis Ryu (History and East Asian Studies), and Jessica Stair (History of Art and Architecture).

    The Spring 2021 edition of “Meet the Fellows: A Welcome to the Cogut Institute” will offer the Brown community, as well as alumni and other community members, a rich sense of the work being done at the Institute.

    Humanities
  • The Early Modern World in United States Libraries and Collections  Orientations and Opportunities

    This unique series of interactive events will showcase the resources of some of the world’s most prestigious libraries and special collections for research on the early modern period.

    On each occasion, representatives will speak from their institution to explain the nature of its holdings, offering orientations to potential first-time readers and new information valuable to regular visitors. Following the introductory presentations, there will be opportunities for questions and answers about practical matters – ranging from subject specialisms and reproduction permissions to programs and residence or fellowship opportunities.

    The series will continue through 2021 and 2022 and will be extended to introduce some international libraries in future years. It will begin on February 3rd with the Folger Institute (see below), with which the Center enjoys a longstanding and active association.

    These events are organized exclusively for Brown graduates, faculty, and associate members of the Center: details of how to register will be made available through this website and through our circulars closer to the time.

    FOLGER INSTITUTE AND FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY, Washington, D.C.

    Caroline Duroselle-Melish, the Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Early Modern Books and Prints, Amanda Herbert, Associate Director for Research Fellowships, Owen Williams, Associate Director for Scholarly Programs, and Heather Wolfe, Curator of Manuscripts and Associate Librarian for Audience Development, will discuss the Folger Collection and offer brief presentations on Folger opportunities for members of the Center and the Brown scholarly community, followed by a Q&A.

    Register.

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • This workshop on print and digital publishing focuses on practical considerations and real possibilities for graduate students in Italian Studies. Topics include identifying publishing opportunities; working with editors; navigating peer review and the revision process; copyright guidance; selecting programs, tools, and platforms; and other issues. A list of readings and resources will circulate in advance of the workshop. An art historian educated at Bryn Mawr College, Levy has published widely on early modern Italy and serves as founding General Editor of the Amsterdam University Press book series Visual and Material Culture, 1300-1700. She was previously founding General Editor of the Routledge series Visual Culture in Early Modernity. Her research has been funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Association of University Women, the Getty Research Institute, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, and the Bogliasco Foundation, among others. She currently serves as Co-Chair of the College Art Association Committee on Research and Scholarship.

    21st-Century PhD, Education, Teaching, Instruction, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Libraries, MCM, Research, Teaching & Learning, Training, Professional Development
  • Are you interested in research in the humanities?

    The Cogut Institute for the Humanities offers an undergraduate fellowship for students passionate about the humanities or humanistic social sciences. Fellowships include a $1000 research fund and the unique opportunity to discuss your research alongside a multi-disciplinary group of faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students. Fellows participate in a weekly seminar every Tuesday from 11:00 am – 2:00 pm. The seminar can appear on your spring semester transcript and carry one credit for the year.

    Rising senior honors students are eligible to apply, but all are welcome to attend this information session on Monday, February 8 at noon to learn more about the Cogut Institute and the application process.

    Click here to join this session.

    Humanities
  • Historians in Quarantine, Part III: On Digital History Publishing During and After COVID-19

    featuring

    John Bodel, Professor of Classics and History, Brown University

    Elias Muhanna, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and History, Brown University

    Tara Nummedal, Professor of History and Italian Studies, Brown University

     

    To register for the above event, click here .

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

     

    21st-Century PhD
  • When and why to write for the public? What should you consider when making your pitch? What does the editing process look like?

    Register for this event.

    Guest panelists and public writers Erin Bartram (historian of 19th-century America, women, and religion), Sarah Scullin (classicist and former managing editor of Eidolon) , and Fatima Husain ’17 (managing producer of the sustainability science radio show Possibly,  host of MIT Abstracts, and MIT PhD student in Geobiology) share their thoughts on what makes for good public writing in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. The session is moderated by Charles Carroll, Assistant Director of the Writing Center/Sheridan Center and Visiting Assistant Professor of History, together with Brown University doctoral students Erica Meszaros and Sara Mohr, managing editors of the public scholarship blog The Ratty.

    This online event, open to the public, is presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its 21st-Century PhD series and by the Writing Center/Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning.

    Image: From ground (2010) wool-felt carpet installation by Ann Hamilton in Pembroke Hall

    21st-Century PhD, Humanities, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • In this hands-on workshop, participants will receive feedback on their public writing pitch in small breakout groups from guest public writers Erin Bartram (historian of 19th-century America, women, and religion), Sarah Scullin (classicist and former managing editor of Eidolon), and Fatima Husain ’17 (managing producer of the sustainability science radio show Possibly, host of MIT Abstracts, and MIT PhD student in Geobiology) as well as Charles Carroll, Assistant Director of the Sheridan Center/Writing Center and Visiting Assistant Professor of History, and Brown University doctoral students Erica Meszaros and Sara Mohr, managing editors of the public scholarship blog The Ratty.

    Register.  You must be logged into your Brown University email account to access the form.

    The workshop is open to all Brown University graduate students across disciplines. Preference will be given to participants who attended the first session on February 11. The Zoom meeting information will be distributed to participants the day before the event. Participants will be asked to submit a draft pitch of 2-5 sentences by February 17, noon.

    Participants will have the opportunity to ask additional questions about exploring venues to publish public writing and resources available at Brown University as well as to submit pitches for consideration by The Ratty.

    This workshop is presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its 21st-Century PhD series and by the Writing Center/Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning.

    21st-Century PhD, Humanities, Physical & Earth Sciences, Psychology & Cognitive Sciences, Social Sciences
  • This session of the reading group will be led by Sophie Brunau.  More information about this virtual session is forthcoming.

    The Environmental Humanities Reading Group is part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Live from the Field: History PhDs in High School Teaching and Administration

    featuring

    Christopher Jones, Instructor, Department of History and Social Science, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA

    Marisela Ramos, Chair and Instructor, Department of History and Social Science, and LGBTQ+ Adult Coordinator, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA

    Anthony Watson, Instructor, Department of History, Woodberry Forest School, Woodberry Forest, VA

     

    To register for the above event, click here .

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

    21st-Century PhD
  •  

    NETTIE LEE BENSON LIBRARY LATIN AMERICAN COLLECTION, Austin, TX

    Daniel Arbino, the Benson’s Head of Collection Development, Dylan Joy, the Latin American Archivist, and Albert Palacios, the Benson’s Digital Scholarship Coordinator, will be offering a joint presentation on the Collection and its resources, followed by a Q&A.

    Register.

    This a continuation of the series “The Early Modern World in United States Libraries and Collections Orientations and Opportunities,” interactive events that showcase the resources of some of the world’s most prestigious libraries and special collections for research on the early modern period.

    On each occasion, representatives speak from their institution to explain the nature of its holdings, offering orientations to potential first-time readers and new information valuable to regular visitors. Following the introductory presentations, there are opportunities for questions and answers about practical matters – ranging from subject specialisms and reproduction permissions to programs and residence or fellowship opportunities.

    The series will continue through 2021 and 2022 and will be extended to introduce some international libraries in future years. The first event on February 3rd, 2021 involves the Folger Institute, with which the Center enjoys a longstanding and active association.

    These events are organized exclusively for Brown graduates, faculty, and associate members of the Center.

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • Alumni Stories: Brown History PhDs and Tenure-track Faculty Careers at Public Universities

    featuring

    Sara Fingal, Assistant Professor, Department of American Studies, California State University, Fullerton

    Alicia Maggard, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Auburn University

    Tshombe Miles, Associate Professor, Department of Black and Latino Studies, Baruch College, City University of New York

     

    To register for the above event, click here .

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

    21st-Century PhD
  • Live from the Field: History and Humanities PhDs in University Administration

    Featuring

    Ferentz LaFargue, Dean of the College, Saybrook College, Yale University

    Laura Perille, Associate Director, Office of Fellowships, Awards, and Resources, Georgetown University

    Joel Revill, Senior Associate Dean of the Faculty and Adjunct Assistant Professor of History, Brown University

     

    To register for the above event, click here .

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

    21st-Century PhD
  •  

    THE NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago, IL

    Lia Markey, director of the Center for Renaissance Studies, Suzanne Karr Schmidt (a Brown alum!), Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts, and one other Renaissance Center staff member or curator will be offering a joint presentation on the Collection and its resources, followed by a Q&A.

    Register.

    The Early Modern World in United States Libraries and Collections Orientations and Opportunities

    This unique series of interactive events showcase the resources of some of the world’s most prestigious libraries and special collections for research on the early modern period.

    On each occasion, representatives will speak from their institution to explain the nature of its holdings, offering orientations to potential first-time readers and new information valuable to regular visitors. Following the introductory presentations, there will be opportunities for questions and answers about practical matters – ranging from subject specialisms and reproduction permissions to programs and residence or fellowship opportunities.

    The series will continue through 2021 and 2022 and will be extended to introduce some international libraries in future years. The first event on February 3rd, 2021 will involve the Folger Institute , with which the Center enjoys a longstanding and active association, and there will be a presentation from representatives of the Nettie Lee Benson Library on February 24th.

    These events are organized exclusively for Brown graduates, faculty, and associate members of the Center.

    Early Modern World, Humanities, Research, Social Sciences
  • A John Hay Library/Center for the Study of the Early Modern World fellowship project, this interdisciplinary symposium convenes to bring forward new or underexplored theories of performance in the study of the global early modern, with a focus on performance in relation to the objects of historical analysis. These objects may be archival materials, the individuals or collectivities that produced these materials, or conceptual and abstract knowledge-objects. How can performance, as a theoretical rubric, illuminate the interaction within and among such categories of object, as well as between object and subject— both historical subjects and historian-subjects? How do objects represent, enact, or mediate performance? In what ways can one object surrogate or perform as another? How do objects circulate performances across distances of space and time?

    The symposium will be held virtually over two sessions on June 14th and June 15th. Papers by invited scholars will be published online in advance. Each of the two symposium sessions will be divided between discussion of the papers and presentations by participants on relevant objects digitized from the John Hay Library’s collections. Professor Holly Shaffer of Brown’s Department of the History of Art and Architecture will moderate.

    Early Modern World, Humanities, Libraries, Social Sciences