Events

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  • Invasion biology is the field of ecology and conservation biology that interacts with introduced and invasive species. Introduced species are biogeographically “non-native,” requiring anthropogenic or human-aided dispersal to cross geographic barriers, and those introduced populations that have undesirable economic, environmental, or public health effects are usually those labelled “invasive.” Invasion biology formed in the late 20th century in response to concerns about the conservation implications of some introduced species. The field has since faced criticisms from scholars in multiple fields for alleged xenophobia, fear-mongering, advocacy of controversial management and eradication campaigns, as well as some invasion biologists’ philosophy of nature, which, like romantic ideals of “wilderness,” seems to exclude humans. This presentation will clarify and evaluate competing ethical justifications of invasion biologists’ concern with introduced species, advocating a pluralistic view that attempts to balance the diverse values at stake in the study and management of invasive species.

    David M. Frank is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. His research focuses on values and ethics in environmental sciences. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Texas in 2012 with a dissertation on philosophy of conservation biology. He has since held postdoctoral positions at New York University, the University of North Carolina, and the University of Tennessee, developing research collaborations with environmental scientists and teaching courses on environmental ethics, research ethics, and philosophy of science. His current research focuses on philosophical controversies about invasive species, the ethics and economics of the Green New Deal, and the ethics of environmental health research.

    This event is free and open to the public, it is presented as part of the Cogut Institute’s Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    Register More Information Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • April 30, 2021 | 12 pm (ET) / 6 pm (SAST)

    These words mean and remember their origins in each other, each produced by the other, each is equal to the other. In the Black Atlantic, in the Black Pacific, in the Black Mediterranean, cartography is catastrophe, catastrophe is cartography. Each contributor as academics, as poets, as artists will dwell on the movement—symbolized by the double colon between these concepts.

    Contributors include:

    Dele Adeyemo is an architect, creative director, and urban theorist. His creative and research practices interrogate the underlying drivers of architectural development and urbanisation, locating them in racialising logistical processes that orchestrate planetary patterns of life. Adeyemo’s projects mobilize a transdisciplinary Black aesthetics. Through the use of writing, film, movement and aural sensations that rupture machinic fantasies of logistics, his work uncovers the indeterminate imaginaries of Black life in Africa and the diaspora. Most recently Adeyemo has presented at the 2nd edition of the Lagos Biennial with Black Horizon (2019), and the 5th Istanbul Design Biennial with The Cosmogony of (Racial) Capitalism (2020). Adeyemo is a Ph.D. candidate in the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths, University of London, and leads an architecture design studio with Ibiye Camp and Damso Randulfe at the Royal College of Art in London.

    Dionne Brand is a renowned poet, novelist, and essayist known for formal experimentation and the beauty and urgency of her work. A poet engagé, Brand’s award-winning poetry books include Land to Light On (the Governor General’s Literary Award and Trillium Book Award); thirsty (The Pat Lowther Award); Ossuaries (the prestigious Griffin Poetry Prize). Her latest, The Blue Clerk, an essay poem, won the Trillium Book Award. Theory, her latest of five novels, won the Toronto Book Award. She is the author of the influential nonfiction work, A Map to the Door of No Return. Her most recent non-fiction work is An Autobiography of the Autobiography of Reading. Brand is Professor in the School of English and Theatre Studies at the University of Guelph.

    Kevin Adonis Browne is a Caribbean American photographer, writer, and speaker, whose visual and written work exist at the intersection of fine art photography and memoir. He is the author of two books: Tropic Tendencies: Rhetoric, Popular Culture, and the Anglophone Caribbean (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2013) and HIGH MAS: Carnival and the Poetics of Caribbean Culture (University Press of Mississippi, 2018). He has taught at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Bentley University, The University of the West Indies at St. Augustine, and is currently Associate Professor of Writing Studies, Rhetoric, and Composition at Syracuse University.

    Torkwase Dyson is a painter whose compositions address the continuity of space, movement, ecology, and architecture. Examining black geographies, Dyson’s objects consider black liberation and industrial precariousness. The work invites questions of distance, embodiment and perception. Torkwase Dyson was born in Chicago and spent her developmental years between North Carolina and Mississippi. Traversing these geographies helped develop formal and conceptual concerns of black spatial liberation strategies. In 2020, Dyson’s solo exhibitions included Black Compositional Thought | 15 Paintings for the Plantationocene presented by the New Orleans Museum of Art and I Can Drink the Distance, Plantationocene in Two Acts on view at Pace Gallery New York. Dyson lives in New York and is represented by Pace.

    Canisia Lubrin is a writer, poet, editor, and teacher. Lubrin, is the author of Voodoo Hypothesis (W&W, 2017), which was named a CBC Best Book, The Dyzgraphxst (M&S, 2020) and the forthcoming collection of fiction, Code Noir.

    Danai Mupotsa is a senior lecturer in the Department of African Literature at Wits. She describes herself as a feminist teacher and researcher. In 2018, she published her debut collection of poetry, feeling and ugly with impepho press. Her work specializes in a range of subjects that include gender and sexualities, black intellectual traditions and histories, intimacy and affect, popular culture, and feminist pedagogies.

    Christina Sharpe is a writer and Canada Research Chair in Black Studies in the Department of Humanities at York University. She is the author of: In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (Duke University Press, 2016) and Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects (Duke University Press, 2010). Her third book, Ordinary Notes, will be published in 2022 (Knopf/FSG/Daunt). She is also working on a monograph called “Black. Still. Life.

    Hosted by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities’ Black Visualities Initiative under the leadership of Tina Campt, and presented collaboratively with The Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre (VIAD) at the University of Johannesburg and Art for Humanity at Durban University of Technology, with the support of the Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration (RITM).

    Registration More Information Black Visualities, Humanities
  • This event is part of the series “Democracy: A Humanities Perspective,” convened by Amanda Anderson, Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. The series features short talks followed by two responses and a larger conversation among the participants and the audience. Through both the format and the content, we aim to showcase the forms of layered understanding and analysis that humanities scholars bring to the study of democracy, with special emphasis on current challenges in the U.S. and abroad. The events are free and open to the public.

    More information about this event is forthcoming.

    More Information Humanities
  • May 20-22, 2021, 11:00 am – 3:00 pm ET

    The Spring 2021 edition of Political Concepts at Brown invites the featured graduate speakers and the conference participants more broadly to generate and rethink concepts from the positions of the student. The conference addresses a moment of crisis indicated in the U.S. by the failure to contain the coronavirus pandemic, sustained state violence against Black Americans, and increasingly active White supremacist movements. Proposed as early as April of last year, all the concepts to be discussed from across the humanities and social sciences link the structural conditions of, as well as the persistence of popular resistance to, this crisis. The conference wagers that graduate students have a distinctive political role as intellectual workers whose avowal of their lack of knowledge drives their will to generate concepts—insisting that the world is not reducible to what already is, but might be otherwise.

    Additional information is forthcoming.

    The conference is organized by Brown University graduate students Felicia Denaud (Africana Studies), Jeffrey Feldman (Political Science), Julia Huggins (Modern Culture and Media), Kristen Maye (Africana Studies), Marah Nagelhout (English), Rachel Nusbaum (Political Science), and Nick Pisanelli (English).

    Hosted by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of the Political Concepts Initiative and co-sponsored by Hispanic Studies, Italian Studies, Modern Culture and Media and the Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, Religious Studies, and the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs.

    More Information Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • May 20-22, 2021, 11:00 am – 3:00 pm ET

    The Spring 2021 edition of Political Concepts at Brown invites the featured graduate speakers and the conference participants more broadly to generate and rethink concepts from the positions of the student. The conference addresses a moment of crisis indicated in the U.S. by the failure to contain the coronavirus pandemic, sustained state violence against Black Americans, and increasingly active White supremacist movements. Proposed as early as April of last year, all the concepts to be discussed from across the humanities and social sciences link the structural conditions of, as well as the persistence of popular resistance to, this crisis. The conference wagers that graduate students have a distinctive political role as intellectual workers whose avowal of their lack of knowledge drives their will to generate concepts—insisting that the world is not reducible to what already is, but might be otherwise.

    Additional information is forthcoming.

    The conference is organized by Brown University graduate students Felicia Denaud (Africana Studies), Jeffrey Feldman (Political Science), Julia Huggins (Modern Culture and Media), Kristen Maye (Africana Studies), Marah Nagelhout (English), Rachel Nusbaum (Political Science), and Nick Pisanelli (English).

    Hosted by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of the Political Concepts Initiative and co-sponsored by Hispanic Studies, Italian Studies, Modern Culture and Media and the Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, Religious Studies, and the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs.

    More Information Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • May 20-22, 2021, 11:00 am – 3:00 pm ET

    The Spring 2021 edition of Political Concepts at Brown invites the featured graduate speakers and the conference participants more broadly to generate and rethink concepts from the positions of the student. The conference addresses a moment of crisis indicated in the U.S. by the failure to contain the coronavirus pandemic, sustained state violence against Black Americans, and increasingly active White supremacist movements. Proposed as early as April of last year, all the concepts to be discussed from across the humanities and social sciences link the structural conditions of, as well as the persistence of popular resistance to, this crisis. The conference wagers that graduate students have a distinctive political role as intellectual workers whose avowal of their lack of knowledge drives their will to generate concepts—insisting that the world is not reducible to what already is, but might be otherwise.

    Additional information is forthcoming.

    The conference is organized by Brown University graduate students Felicia Denaud (Africana Studies), Jeffrey Feldman (Political Science), Julia Huggins (Modern Culture and Media), Kristen Maye (Africana Studies), Marah Nagelhout (English), Rachel Nusbaum (Political Science), and Nick Pisanelli (English).

    Hosted by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of the Political Concepts Initiative and co-sponsored by Hispanic Studies, Italian Studies, Modern Culture and Media and the Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, Religious Studies, and the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs.

    More Information Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • A John Hay Library/Center for the Study of the Early Modern World fellowship project, this interdisciplinary symposium convenes to bring forward new or underexplored theories of performance in the study of the global early modern, with a focus on performance in relation to the objects of historical analysis. These objects may be archival materials, the individuals or collectivities that produced these materials, or conceptual and abstract knowledge-objects. How can performance, as a theoretical rubric, illuminate the interaction within and among such categories of object, as well as between object and subject— both historical subjects and historian-subjects? How do objects represent, enact, or mediate performance? In what ways can one object surrogate or perform as another? How do objects circulate performances across distances of space and time?

    The symposium will be held virtually over two sessions on June 14th and June 15th. Papers by invited scholars will be published online in advance. Each of the two symposium sessions will be divided between discussion of the papers and presentations by participants on relevant objects digitized from the John Hay Library’s collections. Professor Holly Shaffer of Brown’s Department of the History of Art and Architecture will moderate.

    More Information Early Modern World, Humanities, Libraries, Social Sciences