Events

The events feed in University Theme comes from [email protected].

  • In Denise Ferreira da Silva’s words, “this talk is built around a thought experiment, from which I speculate on a basis for thinking that is not contained by the presuppositions and prescriptions of the Kantian program. Neither a concept nor a notion, this image of existence radically departs from post-Enlightenment thinking and its onto-epistemological pillars (separability, determinacy, and sequentiality). In doing so, it allows for an approach to knowing that does not presume something like a mind (Kant’s I think) and its separation from something like a body (or everything else that exists). In short, this image allows for descriptors that presume that every existent (human and more than human) is a body (corpus) without limits (infinitum).”

    Denise Ferreira da Silva is Professor and Director of The Social Justice Institute (the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice) at the University of British Columbia. Her research areas include Critical Racial and Ethnic Studies, Feminist Theory, Critical Legal Theory, Political Theory, Moral Philosophy, Postcolonial Studies, and Latin American & Caribbean Studies. She is the principal editor for the Routledge/Cavendish book series Law, Race, and the Postcolonial (with Mark Harris and Rashne Limki).

    Please join the webinar here.

    This talk is presented by the Humanities in the World Initiative as part of its “Race in a Global Frame” lecture series. These lectures showcase transnational perspectives on racialization, racial injustice, racial emancipation, antiracist intervention, and critical race thinking. They will feature new work by emerging and established scholars, writers, artists, and cultural commentators across disciplines and locations.

    Humanities in the World, Humanities
  • What might a decolonial understanding of chemical exposures look like? While concepts like the Anthropocene scale environmental violence up to the planetary level — treating the chemical pollutant and the human body as the same everywhere — this talk takes a non-universalizing approach to chemical violence and its relations to land and bodies. Focusing on the history of Canada’s Chemical Valley and the world’s oldest running oil refinery, this talk asks how the specificity of chemical exposures can be understood in relation to colonialism as well as Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee obligations to land on the lower Great Lakes. In so doing, it makes the case for the need to rethink the assumptions of universalism and liberal humanism that undergird conventional environmental understandings.

    Michelle Murphy is professor of history and women and gender studies at the University of Toronto, Canada Research Chair of Science and Technology Studies and Environmental Data Justice, and Director of the Technoscience Research Unit. Her current research looks at chemical pollution and environmental data in Canada’s Chemical Valley, with a focus on the world’s oldest running oil refinery which sits on the land of Aamjiwnaang First Nation. Murphy’s most recent book is The Economization of Life (Duke University Press, 2017). She is Métis from Winnipeg.

    Join the webinar here. 

    This event is presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown as well as the Collaborative Humanities Initiative.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • “Revisiting Mosquito Empires in the time of COVID-19”

    In this online lecture, environmental historian J.R. McNeill will revisit arguments he made a decade ago in his book, Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean (Cambridge University Press, 2010), which dealt with the extraordinary virulence and historical consequences of epidemics in the Caribbean, ca. 1650-1900. Looking back at his study from the vantage point of the pandemic year 2020 will also permit him to reflect on the importance of disease history in the contemporary world.

    This virtual event , presented by the Medieval and Early Modern History Seminar and the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World , is free and open to the public.

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • How do black collectivity and queer intimacy refuse the category of property? What is made possible when we imagine the tradition of black radicalism as continuous, collective work rather than an inheritance in which individuals accumulate knowledge, or become subjects of history? In this tradition, could we exist together across time, outside the patrimony of ownership or the lure of emancipation as “something akin to freedom” as described by Harriet Jacobs?

    Artist Cameron Rowland and MoMA curator Thomas Lax address these questions and speak together about their collaboration and work. Moderated by Tina Campt (Brown University) and Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa (RISD).

    Presented by the Brown Arts Initiative and Black Visualities Initiative at the Cogut Humanities Institute, with additional support from the Rhode Island School of Design and the Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity, and Transnational Migration at Yale University. 

    Black Visualities, Humanities
  • This session of the reading group will be led by Mark Cladis. More information about this virtual session is forthcoming.

    The Environmental Humanities Reading Group is part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • How does one tell the story of a riot? What narrative method can best show the clash of ideologies and optics that took place on the streets of Charlottesville and the grounds of the University of Virginia without providing another platform for the alt-right? In her work in progress on the Unite the Right Rally of 2017, Deborah Baker looks at the role that academia and high modernism played in helping re-embed whiteness into the new American mainstream.

    Deborah Baker has received fellowships from the Guggenheim and Whiting Foundations in Creative Nonfiction. Her most recent book, The Last Englishman: Love, War and the End of Empire, was published by Graywolf Press in 2018 and was the winner of the Himalayan Club’s annual book prize. Previous works include The Convert: A Tale of Exile and Extremism, which was a finalist for the 2011 National Book Award in Non-fiction and In Extremis: The Life of Laura Riding, shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize in Biography. She is currently working on a book about Charlottesville for which she has received funding from the Robert Silvers Foundation. She is married to the novelist Amitav Ghosh and lives in Brooklyn.

    This talk is presented by the Humanities in the World Initiative as part of its “Race in a Global Frame” lecture series. These lectures showcase transnational perspectives on racialization, racial injustice, racial emancipation, antiracist intervention, and critical race thinking. They will feature new work by emerging and established scholars, writers, artists, and cultural commentators across disciplines and locations.

    Humanities in the World, Humanities
  • This session of the reading group will be led by Marisa Brown. More information about this virtual session is forthcoming.

    The Environmental Humanities Reading Group is part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • This session of the reading group will be led by Sophie Brunau.  More information about this virtual session is forthcoming.

    The Environmental Humanities Reading Group is part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities