Events

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  • Jan
    31
    Virtual
    2:00pm - 3:00pm

    Undergraduate Fellowship Info Session

    Interested in humanities research?

    The Cogut Institute for the Humanities offers an undergraduate fellowship for students passionate about the humanities or humanistic social sciences. Fellowships include a $1,000 research fund and the unique opportunity for collegial interaction with an exciting group of faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate fellows. Fellows participate in a weekly seminar and lunch every Tuesday, 11:00 am – 2:00 pm, sharing work-in-progress. The seminar carries an optional one credit for the year.

    Rising senior honors students are eligible to apply. Applications for fellowships for the 2022–23 academic year are due February 25th.

    Come to our virtual information session to learn more about the institute and the application process.

    See also: https://humanities.brown.edu/apply/undergraduate-fellowship

    For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    Register and Join the Event More Information Humanities
  • Feb
    3
    Virtual
    5:00pm - 6:00pm

    Meet the Fellows: Spring 2022 Edition

    Discover innovative new research through virtual speed talks by 10 current fellows in the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, including faculty, postdocs, and graduate and undergraduate students. Topics include the representation and reimagining of the “Vietnam War” in literature, readerly identification among British novelists, chronic fatigue syndrome, and the ancient Maya.

    The webinar will feature Timothy Bewes (English), Kaitlan Bui (English), Yara Doumani (History and Environmental Studies), Christina Gilligan (English), Connor Jenkins (History and Africana studies), Mariah Min (English and Program in Medieval Studies), Emily Owens (History), Emily Lim Rogers (American Studies and Program in Science, Technology, and Society), Andrew Scherer (Anthropology), and Baoli Yang (Comparative Literature).

    “Meet the Fellows: Spring 2022 Edition” will give the Brown community, as well as alumni and other humanities supporters, a rich sense of the exciting work being done at the institute.

    The event will be hosted by Amanda Anderson, Director of the Cogut Institute and Andrew W. Mellon Professor of English and Humanities.

    This event is free and open to the public. For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    Register and Join the Event More Information Humanities
  • Dionne Brand’s 2018 collection The Blue Clerk: Ars Poetica in 59 Versos has as a double-voiced structure with two narrators — a poet narrator and a clerk who edits the poet’s oeuvre. The versos in question are the poet’s left-hand pages, or discarded drafts, which have notionally been withheld from publication. These versos resist the obligatory dialogue with the colonial tradition which Brand has elsewhere described as a “condition of coloniality.” Conversely, the recto pages — the front side, or right-hand pages — address this tradition explicitly. This lecture will analyze Dionne Brand’s verso poetics as a theory of counter-imperial and postcolonial translation and explore potential points of contact with Horace’s poetics of adaptation in the “Ars Poetica.”

    Emily Greenwood is Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Classics and the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. She works on ancient Greek literature and history, and the plural histories of use that make up the classical tradition of Greece and Rome. At the heart of her research and teaching are the questions, by whom and for whom were the so-called classics of ancient Greece and Rome written, by whom and for whom have they been interpreted, and in view of which histories? For the past decade, her research has focused on anti- and post-colonial uses of Greek and Roman classics in Africa and the Black diaspora. Her publications include Afro-Greeks: Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century (Oxford, 2010), joint winner of the 2011 Runciman Award, and Thucydides and the Shaping of History (Duckworth, 2006). Her current book project is entitled “Black Classicisms and the Expansion of the Western Classical Tradition.”

    This event is free and open to the public. For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    This talk is presented by the Humanities in the World Initiative as part of its “Race in a Global Frame” lecture series. These lectures showcase transnational perspectives on racialization, racial injustice, racial emancipation, antiracist intervention, and critical race thinking. They feature new work by emerging and established scholars, writers, artists, and cultural commentators across disciplines and locations.

    Register and Join the Event More Information Humanities in the World, Humanities
  • In Discriminating Data (MIT Press, 2021), Wendy Hui Kyong Chun reveals how polarization is a goal — not an error — within big data and machine learning. These methods, she argues, encode segregation, eugenics, and identity politics through their default assumptions and conditions. Correlation, which grounds big data’s predictive potential, stems from twentieth-century eugenic attempts to “breed” a better future. Recommender systems foster angry clusters of sameness through homophily. Users are “trained” to become authentically predictable via a politics and technology of recognition. Machine learning and data analytics thus seek to disrupt the future by making disruption impossible.

    Wendy Hui Kyong Chun is Simon Fraser University’s Canada 150 Research Chair in New Media and leads the Digital Democracies Institute. She is the author of several works including Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics(MIT Press, 2006), Programmed Visions: Software and Memory(MIT Press, 2011), Updating to Remain the Same: Habitual New Media(MIT Press, 2016), and Discriminating Data(MIT Press, 2021), and she is the co-author of Pattern Discrimination(University of Minnesota Press and Meson Press, 2019). She has been professor and chair of the Department of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University, where she worked for almost two decades. She has also been a visiting scholar at the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania and a member of the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), and she has held fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Academy of Berlin, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard.

    This event is free and open to the public. For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    The series “Democracy: A Humanities Perspective” is convened by Amanda Anderson, director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. Through both the format and the content, we aim to showcase the forms of layered understanding and analysis that humanities scholars bring to the study of democracy, with special emphasis on current challenges in the U.S. and abroad.

    Further listening: a conversation between Amanda Anderson and Wendy Hui Kyong Chun on the Meeting Street podcast.

    Register and Join the Event More Information Democracy, Humanities
  • Join us for the 2022 edition of the Political Concepts Conference.

    The Political Concepts Initiative operates under the assumption that our era needs a revised political lexicon to help us better understand the world in which we live and act, and that the humanities can and should contribute to such a revision. This is all the more urgent today, given the dramatic and traumatic events of the past two years and their repercussions for all aspects of our lives, from the intimacy of our homes to our shared workplaces, countries, and planet.

    The conference will feature Brown and RISD scholars from a variety of fields exploring concepts that might be revised, deconstructed, or created anew in light of our recent historical experience and to meet the challenges of an ominously uncertain future. What can this period teach us about our society and institutions, “us,” “them,” the planet, the historical present we share, and the future of this sharing?

    The conference has been organized by Tim Bewes, Sharon Krause, and Adi Ophir.

    Schedule

    Friday, February 25, 2022
    10:30 am – 10:45 am Greetings
    10:45 am – 12:30 pm Panel 1
    Zachary Sng, German Studies • “Counting”
    David Frank, Philosophy • “Cooperation”
    Moderator: Amanda Anderson, Cogut Institute
    12:30 pm – 2:00 pm Lunch Break
    2:00 pm – 3:45 pm Panel 2
    Lynne Joyrich, Modern Culture and Media • “Unthinkable”
    Vazira Zamindar, History • “Civilian”
    Moderator: Sharon Krause, Political Science
    3:45 pm – 4:15 pm Coffee Break
    4:15 pm – 6:00 pm Panel 3
    Jinying Li, Modern Culture and Media • “Wall”
    Avishek Ganguly, Literary Arts and Studies, RISD • “Repair”
    Moderator: Adi Ophir, Cogut Institute
    Saturday, February 26, 2022Click here to see schedule.

    See the conference website for abstracts of the talks.

    This event is free and open to the public. For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    More Information Conference, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Join us for the 2022 edition of the Political Concepts Conference.

    The Political Concepts Initiative operates under the assumption that our era needs a revised political lexicon to help us better understand the world in which we live and act, and that the humanities can and should contribute to such a revision. This is all the more urgent today, given the dramatic and traumatic events of the past two years and their repercussions for all aspects of our lives, from the intimacy of our homes to our shared workplaces, countries, and planet.

    The conference will feature Brown and RISD scholars from a variety of fields exploring concepts that might be revised, deconstructed, or created anew in light of our recent historical experience and to meet the challenges of an ominously uncertain future. What can this period teach us about our society and institutions, “us,” “them,” the planet, the historical present we share, and the future of this sharing?

    The conference has been organized by Tim Bewes, Sharon Krause, and Adi Ophir.

    Schedule

    Friday, February 25, 2022Click here to see schedule.
    Saturday, February 26, 2022
    10:30 am – 12:15 pm Panel 1
    Juliet Hooker, Political Science • “Loss”
    Yannis Hamilakis, Archaeology and the Ancient World • “Remains”
    Moderator: Roland Murray, English
    12:15 pm – 1:45 pm Lunch Break
    1:45 pm – 3:30 pm Panel 2
    Masako Fidler, Slavic Studies • “Impoverished morphemes”
    Thomas Schestag, German Studies • “Term”
    Moderator: Peter Szendy, Comparative Literature
    3:30 pm – 3:50 pm Coffee Break
    3:50 pm – 5:50 pm Panel 3
    Holly Case, History • “Struggle”
    Leon Hilton, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies • “Destituence”
    Moderator: Tim Bewes, English

    See the conference website for abstracts of the talks.

    This event is free and open to the public. For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    More Information Conference, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Carolyn Finney, Ph.D., is a storyteller, author, and cultural geographer grounded in both artistic and intellectual ways of knowing. She pursued an acting career for 11 years, but five years of backpacking trips through Africa and Asia and living in Nepal changed the course of her life. She returned to school to complete a B.A., an M.A., and a Ph.D., exploring the intersection of environmental issues with race and gender. Her first book, Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors(UNC Press) was released in 2014. She is currently working on a new book, a more personal journey into the complicated relationship between race, land, and belonging in the United States. She is also working on a performance piece titled The N Word: Nature Revisitedas part of an Andrew W. Mellon residency at the New York Botanical Gardens Humanities Institute. Alongside her work with writing, public speaking, media engagements, consulting, and teaching, she served for eight years on the U.S. National Parks Advisory Board. Currently, she is a columnist at Earth Island Journal and an artist-in-residence in the Franklin Environmental Center at Middlebury College, and she was recently awarded the Alexander and Ilse Melamid Medal from the American Geographical Society.

    This event is free and open to the public. For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    This event is presented by the Cogut Institute’s Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    More Information Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Conversation and book Signing

    Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa, and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of Sidewalks(Coffee House Press, 2014), Faces in the Crowd(Coffee House Press, 2014), The Story of My Teeth(Coffee House Press, 2015), Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions(Coffee House Press, 2017), and Lost Children Archive(Alfred A. Knopf, 2019). She is the recipient of a 2019 MacArthur Fellowship and the winner of DUBLIN Literary Award, two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, the Carnegie Medal, and an American Book Award, and she has been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Kirkus Prize, and the Booker Prize. She is a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her work appears in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Granta, and McSweeney’s, among other publications, and has been translated into more than 20 languages. She is a writer in residence at Bard College and lives in New York City.

    Valeria Luiselli will be in conversation with Brown University faculty member Ralph Rodriguez, Professor of American Studies and English. Rodriguez is the author of Latinx Literature Unbound: Undoing Ethnic Expectation (Fordham University Press, 2018) and Brown Gumshoes: Detective Fiction and the Search for Chicana/o Identity (University of Texas Press, 2005).

    This event is free and open to the public. For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected].

    Free, open to the public. This event is a part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series, which brings high-profile speakers in the humanities to the Brown University campus. Each visit includes a public lecture and a separate seminar-style meeting with undergraduate students. For questions or accommodations, please contact [email protected]

    More Information Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • May 6-7, 2022

    “Capitalism and the Human” begins from two closely related premises: (1) that the category of the human is today inseparable from the dynamics of contemporary capitalism; and (2) that twenty-first century activism cannot evade a critical encounter with the question of the human in its various guises. Topics include the persistent allure of concepts such as agency, autonomy and thought; the philosophical implications of ever more invasive technologies of surveillance and governance; the apparent indispensability of the category of the human in demands for racial justice; and the uncertain prospects of species survival.

    The events of the last 18 months—in particular, the rising threat of fascism despite Trump’s election defeat, publicly documented episodes of police and vigilante anti-black violence, ever more menacing dangers of climate change—cast a further inflection upon these topics. What future remains for one of the most influential traditions of twentieth-century radical thought, the philosophical critique of the human?

    Speakers include Claire Colebrook, Ashley Dawson, Jeremy Gilbert, Asad Haider, Sophie Lewis, Jason W. Moore, Richard E. Purcell, Jason Read, Dierdra Reber, Alexander G. Weheliye, and Kathryn Yusoff.

    More information is forthcoming.

    Free, open to the public. The conference, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative, is co-organized by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English at Brown University, and Jeremy Gilbert, Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London. Gilbert was a visiting professor of the humanities at the Cogut Institute in spring 2020.

    More Information Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities
  • May 6-7, 2022

    “Capitalism and the Human” begins from two closely related premises: (1) that the category of the human is today inseparable from the dynamics of contemporary capitalism; and (2) that twenty-first century activism cannot evade a critical encounter with the question of the human in its various guises. Topics include the persistent allure of concepts such as agency, autonomy and thought; the philosophical implications of ever more invasive technologies of surveillance and governance; the apparent indispensability of the category of the human in demands for racial justice; and the uncertain prospects of species survival.

    The events of the last 18 months—in particular, the rising threat of fascism despite Trump’s election defeat, publicly documented episodes of police and vigilante anti-black violence, ever more menacing dangers of climate change—cast a further inflection upon these topics. What future remains for one of the most influential traditions of twentieth-century radical thought, the philosophical critique of the human?

    Speakers include Claire Colebrook, Ashley Dawson, Jeremy Gilbert, Asad Haider, Sophie Lewis, Jason W. Moore, Richard E. Purcell, Jason Read, Dierdra Reber, Alexander G. Weheliye, and Kathryn Yusoff.

    More information is forthcoming.

    Free, open to the public. The conference, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative, is co-organized by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English at Brown University, and Jeremy Gilbert, Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London. Gilbert was a visiting professor of the humanities at the Cogut Institute in spring 2020.

    More Information Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities