Events

The events feed in University Theme comes from [email protected].

  • Representatives of the John Hay Library will explain Brown’s remarkable collection of rare books, manuscripts, and university archives. Following the introductory presentations, there will be opportunities for questions and answers about practical matters – ranging from subject specialisms and reproduction permissions to programs and fellowship opportunities.

    This event is organized exclusively for Brown graduates, faculty, and associate members of the Center.

    More Information Humanities
  • Feb
    2
    Virtual
    5:00pm - 6:00pm

    Meet the Fellows: Spring 2023 Edition

    These 11 lightning talks showcase innovative new research emerging at Brown from fellows at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, including undergraduate and graduate students, postdocs, and faculty. “Meet the Fellows” is a unique opportunity for members of the extended Brown community to sample research in its in-progress stages, when scholars are still in the process of discovery and making new connections.

    This webinar will feature:

    • Alexander Avila (Undergraduate • Sociology)
    • Mia Freund (Undergraduate • English)
    • Benjamin Hein (Faculty • History)
    • Stephen Houston (Faculty • Anthropology, History of Art and Architecture)
    • Eric Johnson (Postdoc • History of Art and Architecture, Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative)
    • Ren L[i]u> (Undergraduate • Ethnic Studies, Science, Technology, and Society)
    • Ayantu Israel-Megerssa (Graduate • Political Science)
    • Marah Nagelhout (Graduate • English)
    • Hannah Silverblank (Postdoc • Classics, Comparative Literature)
    • Peter Szendy (Faculty • Comparative Literature)
    • Rachel Wetts (Faculty • Environment and Society, Sociology)

    Read more about the fellows and their projects.

    The event will be hosted by Amanda Anderson, Director of the Cogut Institute and Andrew W. Mellon Professor of English and Humanities.

    Information about how to join the virtual event will be available soon.

    For questions or to request special services, accommodations, or assistance, please contact [email protected] or (401) 863-6070.

    More Information Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Feb
    6
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Cogut Institute Undergraduate Fellowship Info Session

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall, Rm 003

    Undergraduates, are you interested in humanities research? Come to our info session to learn more about the Cogut Institute for the Humanities and our undergraduate fellowship.

    If you will be a senior honors student in 2023–24 and are in the humanities or humanistic social sciences, you are eligible to apply for the fellowship. As a fellow, you will have a unique opportunity for collegial interaction with an exciting group of faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate fellows. The fellowship also carries a $1,000 research fund and 1 credit for the academic year.

    The info session will cover the details of the fellowship program and the application process and give you a chance to ask questions. Pizza will be served.

    Applications are due February 24, 2023. Read more.

    For questions or to request special services, accommodations, or assistance, please contact [email protected] or (401) 863-6070.

    More Information Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Feb
    16
    1:00pm - 2:00pm

    Undergraduate Seminar with Ocean Vuong

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This special seminar with Ocean Vuong is open to Brown University undergraduate students only.

    Registration information to be announced. Please check back again.

    Ocean Vuong is the author of The New York Times bestselling poetry collection Time Is a Mother (Penguin, 2022) and The New York Times bestselling novel On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous (Penguin, 2019), which has been translated into 37 languages. A recipient of a 2019 MacArthur “Genius” Grant, he is also the author of the critically acclaimed poetry collection Night Sky with Exit Wounds (Copper Canyon Press, 2016), a New York Times Top 10 Book of 2016 and winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Whiting Award, the Thom Gunn Award, and the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. His honors include a Ruth Lilly fellowship from the Poetry Foundation; fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, the Elizabeth George Foundation, and the Academy of American Poets; and the Pushcart Prize. His writings have been featured in The Atlantic, Granta, Harpers, The Nation, New Republic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Paris Review, The Village Voice, and American Poetry Review, which awarded him the Stanley Kunitz Prize for Younger Poets. Born in Saigon, Vietnam, and raised in Hartford, Connecticut, in a working class family of nail salon and factory laborers, he was educated at nearby Manchester Community College before transferring to Pace University to study International Marketing. Without completing his first term, he dropped out of business school and enrolled at Brooklyn college, where he graduated with a BA in 19th-century American literature. He subsequently received his MFA in poetry from NYU. He currently lives in Northampton, Massachusetts, and serves as a tenured professor in the creative writing MFA program at NYU.

    For questions or to request special services, accommodations, or assistance, please contact [email protected] or (401) 863-6070.

    This event is a part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series, which brings high-profile speakers in the humanities to the Brown University campus. Each visit includes a public lecture and a separate seminar-style meeting with undergraduate students.

    More Information 
  • Feb
    16
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    A Conversation with Ocean Vuong

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall, Rm 305

    Join us for a presentation and conversation featuring author Ocean Vuong with Brown University professor Daniel Y. Kim.

    Registration opens soon.

    Doors open at 3:30 pm. Ticket holders must arrive before 3:50 pm to claim their seats. Any reserved seats not claimed by 3:50 pm will be released to the public on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Featured Speaker

    Ocean Vuong is the author of The New York Times bestselling poetry collection Time Is a Mother (Penguin, 2022) and The New York Times bestselling novel On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous (Penguin, 2019), which has been translated into 37 languages. A recipient of a 2019 MacArthur “Genius” Grant, he is also the author of the critically acclaimed poetry collection Night Sky with Exit Wounds (Copper Canyon Press, 2016), a New York Times Top 10 Book of 2016 and winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Whiting Award, the Thom Gunn Award, and the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. His honors include a Ruth Lilly fellowship from the Poetry Foundation; fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, the Elizabeth George Foundation, and the Academy of American Poets; and the Pushcart Prize. His writings have been featured in The Atlantic, Granta, Harpers, The Nation, New Republic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Paris Review, The Village Voice, and American Poetry Review, which awarded him the Stanley Kunitz Prize for Younger Poets. Born in Saigon, Vietnam, and raised in Hartford, Connecticut, in a working class family of nail salon and factory laborers, he was educated at nearby Manchester Community College before transferring to Pace University to study International Marketing. Without completing his first term, he dropped out of business school and enrolled at Brooklyn college, where he graduated with a BA in 19th-century American literature. He subsequently received his MFA in poetry from NYU. He currently lives in Northampton, Massachusetts, and serves as a tenured professor in the creative writing MFA program at NYU.

    Conversation Moderator

    Daniel Y. Kim is Professor of English and American Studies at Brown University. He is author of The Intimacies of Conflict: A Cultural History of the Korean War (NYU Press, 2020) and Writing Manhood in Black and Yellow: Ralph Ellison, Frank Chin, and the Literary Politics of Identity (Stanford University Press, 2005). He is the co-editor (with Crystal Parikh) of The Cambridge Companion to Asian American Literature (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

    Free and open to the public. For questions or to request special services, accommodations, or assistance, please contact [email protected] or (401) 863-6070.

    This event is a part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series, which brings high-profile speakers in the humanities to the Brown University campus. Each visit includes a public lecture and a separate seminar-style meeting with undergraduate students.

    More Information Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Claire Gilbert is an Associate Professor of Early Modern History at Saint Louis University. She is the author of In Good Faith: Arabic Translation and Translators in Early Modern Spain, out of the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2020. She is also the author of various articles and book chapters about the social history of translation and the political consequences of language contact in the Western Mediterranean. Her work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Philosophical Society, the Newberry Library, the Huntington Library, the Fulbright Commission, and the Social Science Research Council. Her new research is exploring the history of language sciences in the early modern Mediterranean, with an emphasis on linguistic thought generated through contact between Arabic and Romance languages.

    Brown University abides by public health guidance and health and safety protocols to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event, including current University policy regarding face masks and coverings (see the University’s COVID-19 Campus Activity Status page for the current policy for both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals).

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Mar
    3
    All Day

    Political Concepts: The Literature Edition

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall, Rm 305

    If we know anything about the relation between literature and politics, it is that the political effects of a literary work cannot be guaranteed by what takes place or is spoken within it. What we call “content” may have little or nothing to do with the work’s political significance. “The more the opinions of the author remain hidden,” said Friedrich Engels, “the better for the work of art.”

    “Political Concepts: The Literature Edition” invites scholars from a variety of fields to explore concepts drawn from the realm of literature that might be revised, deconstructed, or created anew to shed light on our contemporary political climate.

    Free and open to the public. For questions or to request special services, accommodations, or assistance, please contact [email protected] or (401) 863-6070.

    The event is presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities and convened by Timothy Bewes, Sharon Krause, and Adi Ophir.

    More Information Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Apr
    13
    4:00pm - 6:00pm

    Meghan O’Gieblyn, “The Life of the Mind”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall, Rm 305

    “First-person writers,” says author Meghan O’Gieblyn, “have always called upon metaphorical language to describe their interior worlds. But as our metaphors for consciousness grow increasingly technological — as we come to see our brains as hardware, and our minds as software — these interior worlds have come to seem less reliable, premised as they are on what the philosopher Daniel Dennett has called the myth of ‘privileged access.’ Our conception of our inner lives is also changing due to current debates about consciousness and the emergence of advanced technologies. At a moment when algorithms are learning to write sonnets and online political discourse has been infiltrated by bots, the ability to believe in the interior lives of others (and of ourselves) is becoming more fraught and requires, at times, a leap of faith.”

    Meghan O’Gieblyn is the author of God, Human, Animal, Machine: Technology, Metaphor, and the Search for Meaning (Doubleday, 2021) and Interior States (Anchor, 2018), which won the 2018 Believer Book Award for nonfiction. Her essays have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, Wired, The Guardian, The New York Times, Bookforum, n+1, The Believer, The Paris Review, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of three Pushcart Prizes and her work has been anthologized in The Best American Essays 2017 (Mariner) and The Contemporary American Essay (Anchor, 2021). She also writes the “Cloud Support” advice column for Wired.

    Lecture and conversation featuring Meghan O’Gieblyn, followed by a book signing. Free and open to the public. For questions or to request special services, accommodations, or assistance, please contact [email protected] or (401) 863-6070.

    This event is a part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series, which brings high-profile speakers in the humanities to the Brown University campus. Each visit includes a public lecture and a separate seminar-style meeting with undergraduate students.

    More Information Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    14
    10:00am - 11:30am

    Undergraduate Seminar with Meghan O’Gieblyn

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This special seminar with Meghan O’Gieblyn is open to Brown University undergraduate students only. Register.

    Meghan O’Gieblyn is the author of God, Human, Animal, Machine: Technology, Metaphor, and the Search for Meaning (Doubleday, 2021) and Interior States (Anchor, 2018), which won the 2018 Believer Book Award for nonfiction. Her essays have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, Wired, The Guardian, The New York Times, Bookforum, n+1, The Believer, The Paris Review, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of three Pushcart Prizes and her work has been anthologized in The Best American Essays 2017 (Mariner) and The Contemporary American Essay (Anchor, 2021). She also writes the “Cloud Support” advice column for Wired.

    For questions or to request special services, accommodations, or assistance, please contact [email protected] or (401) 863-6070.

    This event is a part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series, which brings high-profile speakers in the humanities to the Brown University campus. Each visit includes a public lecture and a separate seminar-style meeting with undergraduate students.

    More Information Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Syrithe Pugh will give a talk on “Human Resources: Class and Cannibalism in “The Hock-Cart”.”

    Dr. Syrithe Pugh is a Reader in English at the University of Aberdeen, specializing in classical reception in Renaissance literature. She has published three monographs Spenser and Ovid (2005), Herrick, Fanshawe and the Politics of Intertextuality (2010), and Spenser and Virgil: The Pastoral Poems (2016), which was awarded the Isabel MacCaffrey Award in 2017. Other publications include two forthcoming edited volumes Conversations: Classical and Renaissance Intertextuality (Manchester University Press) and Euhemerism and its Uses: The Mortal Gods (Routledge).

    Brown University abides by public health guidance and health and safety protocols to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event, including current University policy regarding face masks and coverings (see the University’s COVID-19 Campus Activity Status page for the current policy for both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals).

    More Information 
  • Apr
    27
    10:00am - 6:00pm

    Early Modern Conference  • Nahuatl Texts and Contexts

    Alumnae Hall, Rm Crystal Room

    At this conference scholars, students, and speakers of the Mexican language of Nahuatl will offer papers on linguistic, literary, and ethnohistorical questions raised by discursive and pictorial sources – from the early modern period to the present day. A significant number of sessions will be dedicated to the group study of original manuscripts in Nahuatl. A formal call for 20-minute papers will be issued early in 2023.

    More Information History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities