The Brown Center For The

Study Of Children At Risk






Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk
50 Holden Street
Providence RI 02908

Academic Administration:
(401) 453-7640

Clinical Services:
(401) 274-1122
x8936 or x8935

Contact Us

 

Faculty


Stephen J. Sheinkopf, PhD - Assistant Professor

Dr. Sheinkopf is an Assistant Professor (Research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior.  Dr. Sheinkopf is a clinical psychologist and is also a member of the Developmental Disabilities Program at Bradley Hospital and a faculty member of the Brown Brain Sciences Program.  Dr. Sheinkopf has extensive clinical experience in the area of early childhood, with particular expertise in the area of early diagnosis and development of young children with autism and developmental disabilities.  His research interests include studies of young children with autism and the development of children with prenatal drug exposure, including investigations of joint attention and social communication behaviors in these populations, as well as studies using measures of psychophysiology, such as cardiorespiratory functioning and functional neuroimaging.  Dr. Sheinkopf’s teaching responsibilities are with pediatric residents, fellows and clinical psychology trainees.

Stephen_Sheinkopf@Brown.edu

Selected Publications

  • Sheinkopf, S.J., Mundy, P., Oller, D.K., & Steffens, M. (2000)  Vagal atypicalities of preverbal autistic children.  Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, (30), 345-354.
  • Sheinkopf, S.J., Mundy, P., Claussen, A.H., & Willoughby, J. (2004).  Infant Joint Attention Skill and Preschool Behavioral Outcomes in At-Risk Children.  Development and Psychopathology, (16), 273-291.
  • Sheinkopf, S.J., Lester, B.M., Eliassen, J. C., Sanes, J.N., Hutchison, E. R., Seifer, R., et al. (2004).  Functional MRI and prenatal cocaine exposure.  Pediatric Research, 55 (4), 580A.
  • Sheinkopf, S.J., Lester, B.M., LaGasse, L.L., Seifer, R., Bauer, C.R.,  Shankaran, S., Bada, H., Poole, K., Wright, L.L. (2006).  Neonatal Irritability, Prenatal Substance Exposure, and Later Parenting Stress.  Journal of Pediatric Psychology, (31), 27-40.