The Brown Center For The

Study Of Children At Risk






Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk
50 Holden Street
Providence RI 02908

Academic Administration:
(401) 453-7640

Clinical Services:
(401) 274-1122
x8936 or x8935

Contact Us

 

Faculty


Mary C. Sullivan, PhD, RN, FAAN - Professor

Mary Sullivan is a research scientist at the Brown Center for Children and a Professor in the College of Nursing at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Sullivan's research is focused on the developmental trajectories of preterm infants and understanding the medical and environmental risk and protective processes that exacerbate or ameliorate the impact of cumulative risk on outcomes. Supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research, the current project is entitled "Risk and Protection in Trajectories of Preterm Infants: Birth to Adulthood." The study examines the impact of prematurity, medical history, and environments on outcomes and concerns through young adulthood. Assessments used include biomarkers of blood chemistry, pulmonary function testing, cardiopulmonary response to exercise and metabolic functioning, and HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) function by salivary cortisol. The intent is to show whether prematurity impacts health and early disease onset could be explained by alterations in HPA function. Another ongoing research study at Women & Infants Hospital aims to compare the medical and neurobehavioral status at discharge of infants in an open bay NICU with infants in a single room NICU. The study entitled, "Effects of Open Bay versus Single Room NICU on Infant Outcome at Discharge" is conducted with colleagues at the Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk.  

MCSullivan@uri.edu

Selected Publications

  • Msall, M. E., Sullivan, M. C., & Park, J. (2010). Pathways of risk and resilience after prematurity: Role of socioeconomic status. In C. Nosarti, R. Murray, M. Hack (Eds). Preterm birth: Long-term effects on brain and behavior. Cambridge University Press.
  • Miller, R. J., Sullivan, M. C., Hawes, K., & Kerivan Marks, A. K. (2009). The effects of perinatal morbidity and environmental factors on health status of preterm children at age 12. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 24, 101-114.
  • Barcelos Winchester, S., Sullivan, M.C., Marks, A.K., Doyle, T., DePalma, J., & McGrath, M.M (2009) Academic, social, behavioral outcomes at age 12 of infants born preterm. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 31, 853-871.
  • Sullivan, M.C., Hawes, K., Winchester, S.B., Miller, R. (2008). Focus on developmental origins theory: Prematurity to adult disease. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, 37, 158-164.
  • Sullivan, M.C., McGrath, M.M., Hawes, K. & Lester, B.M. (2008). Growth Trajectories of Preterm Infants: Birth to 12 Years. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 22, 83-93.
  • Sullivan, M.C. & Hawes, K. (2007). A decade comparison of preterm motor performance at age 4. Research in Nursing and Health, 30, 641-654.
  • Sullivan, M.C. & Msall, M.E. (2007). Functional Performance in Preterm Children at Age 4. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 22 (4), 297-308.
  • Sullivan, M.C. & Hawes, K. Brain Anatomy & Visual Motor Integration in Preterm Children. (April 2005). Paper presented at the Eastern Nursing Research Society
  • Sullivan, M.C. & McGrath, M.M. (2003). Perinatal morbidity, mild motor delay, and later school outcomes. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 45: 104-112.
  • McGrath, M.M. & Sullivan, M.C. (2003)  Testing proximal and distal protective processes in preterm high risk children.  Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing. 26: 59-76.