Faculty

  • Director, Principal Investigator of MBoA Training Grant, Professor of Medical Science, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Cell cycle control, cellular senescence, telomeres, epigenetics

    John Sedivy is recognized for his efforts in mammalian genetics, having developed and pioneered in the late 1980's methods for gene targeting of somatic cells. In 1995 his lab isolated the first viable knockout of c-Myc in a rat fibroblast cell line, which led to his career-long interest in this...

  • Associate Director of the Biology of Aging Initiative, Associate Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry (Research) Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Computational biology, bioinformatics, gene networks, and chromatin.

    Dr. Kreiling’s research is focused on understanding the connection between age-associated changes in the epigenetic signature of chromatin and the resulting changes in gene expression. Aging is the primary risk factor for the onset of multiple degenerative conditions, such as dementias,...

  • Associate Director for Research, Professor of Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Genetic control of longevity, calorie restriction, Sir2, resveratrol, Drosophila model system

    Stephen Helfand is recognized for his research on the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of aging, as well as the metabolic changes that occur with and contribute to the deleterious aspects of aging. His group began studying the molecular genetics of aging...

  • Associate Director of MBoA Training Grant, Professor of Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    Demography, evolution and genetics of aging, endocrine control of longevity, insulin/IGF signaling, innate immunity, Drosophila model system

    Dr. Tatar is widely recognized for key studies to understand the mechanisms of longevity control through the explicit analysis of age-specific mortality. Trained as an ecologist, Dr. Tatar initially worked on many natural...

  • Professor of Medical Science Department of Orthopaedics

    Cartilage and bone development, skeletal aging, osteoarthritis, mechanotransduction

    Dr. Chen received a BS in Biochemistry from Fudan University in China and a PhD in Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology from Tufts University School of Medicine. He completed his post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. He was a tenured...

  • Associate Professor of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry

    Biological consequences of DNA damage, inflammation, oxidative stress

    Our research aims to unravel the connections between DNA damage and disease. Using the methods and tools of biochemistry, synthetic chemistry, molecular biology, toxicology and biophysics we probe the effects of DNA damage from the molecular to the cellular level. As a chemistry lab, we exploit our...

  • Professor of Medical Science, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Department of Neuroscience

    Our lab has two major interests. Duchenne muscular dystrophy strikes one in 3,000 boys. Our basic research led to the discovery that the extracellular protein biglycan regulates an intrinsic cellular pathway that can compensate for the genetic defect in Duchenne.  We are currently developing recombinant biglycan as a therapeutic for Duchenne.  Biglycan also holds promise as a therapy for ALS...

  • Associate Professor of Medical Science, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Reproductive aging and senescence, chromatin and transcriptional control, tissue specific gene expression in the mouse reproductive system

    Dr. Freiman's laboratory is interested in deciphering mechanisms of gene expression patterns critical for proper organ development and function in mammals. The lab primarily uses gene targeting in the mouse as a genetic tool to...

  • Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics

    Liver development and regeneration, regulation of protein synthesis, mTOR signaling

    Our laboratory is interested in hepatocyte proliferation during normal liver development, regeneration, carcinogenesis, injury and aging. Model systems are the rat and mouse, and we employ both in vitro and in vivo approaches. Our focus is on the signal transduction...

  • Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine

    Cardiac arrhythmia, sudden death, heart aging

    Gideon Koren's research focuses on the regulation of expression voltage-gated potassium channels and mechanisms of sudden death. One of his current research projects involves rabbits expressing dominant negative transgenes that suppress the expression of repolarization currents in the heart. Transmitters are implanted to...

  • Associate Professor of Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    X-chromosome inactivation, epigenetics, chromatin, Drosophila model system

    Coordinate gene regulation is a fundamental process essential to all cells from the germ line to the immune system. Our long-term goal is to define how genes are identified for coordinate regulation, the key initial step in their regulation. Dosage compensation is one of the best model...

  • Assistant Professor of Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Transcriptional regulation of autophagy, lipid metabolism, lysosomal function and neurodegeneration

    Louis Lapierre joined Brown University in January 2015 to lead a research program focused on studying the regulation of autophagy in aging using primarily the nematode C. elegans. His postdoctoral work has expanded our understanding of the role of the autophagy/...

  • Associate Professor of Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Computational biology, bioinformatics, gene networks, chromatin

    Dr. Neretti was formally trained in physics and has been working on interdisciplinary projects, which involve signal/image processing, and modeling of biological systems. His current focus is the application of high throughput techniques such as gene expression microarrays to study changes in the...

  • Professor of Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    Molecular evolution, evolution of mitochondrial genomes, oxidative respiration

    Professor David Rand is interested in how natural selection acts on genes and genomes. One major focus of his research is how the mitochondrial genome and its interactions with the nuclear genome influence animal performance, evolutionary fitness, and aging. A second major interest is how...

  • Professor of Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Evolution of brain function and behavior, neurodegeneration, RNA editing, ncRNAs, chromatin, Parkinson's disease

    Dr. Reenan is an international leader in the area of eukaryotic gene regulation, and his laboratory has played a seminal role in understanding the process of RNA editing. His multidisciplinary approaches have spanned cutting-edge genetics and molecular...

  • Co-Director of the Pathobiology Graduate Program, Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Research), Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (Research)

    My laboratory focuses on understanding the growth and proliferation of liver progenitor cells. These cells are capable of restoring liver function upon transplantation to an injured liver. By studying these cells, we hope to gain insight into the mechanisms that promote or inhibit liver stem cell engraftment and expansion. This knowledge could lead to new methods to improve the clinical...

  • Investigator, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Dr. Taylor earned his B.S. in Biology from East Carolina University and Ph.D. in Neuroscience at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. He currently works in the lab of Dr. Stephen Helfand, using Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) as a model organism to study genetic regulation of aging and lifespan. Fruit flies are an amazing tool for research on aging, as they offer both a relatively...

  • Assistant Professor of Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry

    Stem cells, transcription factor networks, chromatin, Insulin/IGF/FOXO signaling

    The focus of Ashley Webb’s research is to discover the mechanisms responsible for stem cell aging in mammals, and identify strategies to preserve neural stem cell function in the aged brain. As a postdoctoral fellow, she used genome-wide approaches to investigate how the pro-longevity...

  • Assistant Professor, Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry (Research)

    Genetics of aging and metabolism in Drosophila, chromatin structure, silencing, and transposition in aging.

    Jason Wood is interested in the genetics of aging and calorie restriction, with a particular focus on the sirtuin (Sir2) family of genes, which he has studied in several model systems. He previously characterized the lifespan extending effects of the small...

  • Associate Professor of Orthopaedics and Medicine (Research), Department of Orthopaedics

    Cartilage stem cell, cartilage development and homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling

    Dr. Yang received his M.D degree from Lanzhou University School of Medicine and Ph.D degree in Molecular Biology from Sichuan University in China. He completed his postdoctoral fellowship with Prof. Benjamin G. Neel at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Yang studies the molecular...

  • Professor of Medical Science, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

    DNA damage, oxidative stress, chromatin changes, WRN protein

    DNA is the principal target of the vast majority of human carcinogens. These genotoxic chemicals initiate the carcinogenic process by causing DNA damage that subsequently generates mutations through erroneous replication. DNA is also the main target of several classes of chemotherapeutic drugs that exploit the...