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Graduate School Handbook: Information for Both Programs and Students

Graduate School Handbook hompage

Introduction
The Graduate Council 

Doctoral Degree Programs
     Financial Support for Graduate Study
     Doctoral Student Support Models
         Normative Funding Models
         Teaching Appointments
               Teaching Assistants
               Teaching Fellows
               Teaching While Receiving Support from External Funding
         Research Assistants
         Proctors
         Scholarships
         Fellowships
               External Fellowship Funding Information
               External Fellowships Incentive Policy
               Teaching and Research While on External Fellowship
     Advanced Student Status
               Advanced Student Tuition and Health Insurance Scholarship Table
     Summer Support
     Non-Performance
     Funding Beyond Year Five
Master’s Degree Programs
     Terminal Master’s Degrees
     Program Structure and Matriculation
          Table of Standard Matriculation Patterns by Program
     5th-Year Master’s Degrees
     Master’s Degrees en route to the Ph.D.
     Concurrent Ph.D./Master’s Degree
     Concurrent Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree
Integrative Studies
     Ph.D. in Integrative Studies
     Master’s in Integrative Studies
Directors of Graduate Study
Program Handbooks
Changes in Status
Academic Standing and Warning Policy
     Academic Standing
     Deadlines for Evaluation and Notification
     Evaluation of Students with TA or RA Appointments Outside of their Home Program
     Implications of Academic Standing and Academic Progress for Financial Aid and Student Loan Deferral Status
Visiting Research Fellows and Non-Degree Students
      Visiting Research Fellows
               Visiting Research Fellow Processing Table
Non-Degree Graduate Students
     Non-Degree (Probationary) Students
     Non-Degree (Visiting) Students
     Non-Degree (Postdoctoral) Students
          Non-Degree Graduate Student Processing Table
          Non-Degree Student Information Table

Introduction

This handbook defines the most important policies, procedures and practices that guide graduate education at Brown University. Individual graduate programs often have additional or complementary policies to suit disciplinary customs, but in all instances of policy disagreement the policies presented here prevail. The information and language in this handbook supersedes any conflicting information that may appear on the Graduate School website.

The audience of this handbook consists of graduate students, faculty and Directors of Graduate Study (DGS). This handbook is organized by the audience being addressed, either programs, students, or both programs and students. It is important to remember that every official step in a graduate student’s career requires written notification of the Graduate School and/or Registrar.

The Graduate Council

The faculty delegates certain powers with respect to graduate education to the Graduate Council. The Graduate Council consists of the dean of the Graduate School, chair; the associate dean of research in the Division of Biology and Medicine; the University librarian; the associate deans of the Graduate School, non-voting, ex-officio; eight other members of the faculty; and four graduate students appointed by the Graduate Student Council.

The Graduate Council’s duties are to set policy for the Graduate School subject to the approval of the faculty and the Board of Fellows. Such policy includes the conditions for admission and the procedures for the award of graduate fellowships and scholarships, the supervision of degree requirements, the approval process for new courses and other modifications of existing degree programs, and approval and recommendations to the faculty regarding new degree programs.

At least once every five years, the Graduate Council also reviews graduate programs in consultation with the departments and makes annual reports to the Faculty Executive Committee (FEC) and the faculty of its activities during the preceding year.

Graduate Council Review of Graduate Programs
As part of its regular review of graduate programs, the Graduate Council review is now tied to the external review schedule. The Graduate Council conducts its review within the two years following a department’s external review.

The aim is not to subject programs to repeat scrutiny, but rather to look forward. The Graduate Council asks programs to summarize the results of the self-study, the external review report and the departmental response to the report, as those documents pertain to the graduate program. The Graduate Council will then want to discuss the changes envisioned for the graduate program as a response to the external review.

The following checklist will be useful as programs prepare for their Graduate Council reviews:

  • Excerpt of departmental self-study (section on graduate program)
  • Excerpt or summary of the external review report (section on graduate program)
  • Departmental response to the external review report (section on graduate program), including the description of the graduate program (from web or handbook); and a brief statement of mission and goals
  • Departmental Graduate Handbook
  • Milestones
  • Syllabi for Graduate Courses
  • Data indicators from Graduate School website

Doctoral Degree Programs

Brown University has over 40 Ph.D. programs and awards more than 200 doctor of philosophy degrees annually. (A full listing of all Ph.D. programs can be found here on the Graduate School website.) The Brown Ph.D. is primarily a research degree though teaching is an important part of many doctoral programs, and many departments require candidates for the Ph.D. to develop teaching experience.

Students admitted to a Ph.D. granting program at Brown University are guaranteed five years of support that includes a stipend, full tuition scholarship, coverage of the University health insurance fee, and a health insurance subsidy. All University-based student support is subject to students making satisfactory academic progress as determined by the student’s program of study.

There are four general requirements for the doctor of philosophy:

  1. Admission. The candidate must be formally admitted to his or her degree program.

  2. Residence. The normal residency requirement is the equivalent of three years of full-time study beyond the bachelor's degree that must be spent exclusively in full-time student at Brown. For students admitted into a Ph.D. program with a masters degree the residency requirement is a minimum of one year beyond the master's degree that must be spent exclusively in full-time study at Brown. Graduate work done at other institutions and not used in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of doctor of philosophy elsewhere may, on the recommendation of the department of study, and with the approval of the Registrar, be counted in fulfillment of the degree requirement. However, no more than the equivalent of one full year of study may be counted in this manner. A student who desires credit for work done elsewhere should file an application with their program DGS, and this application should be filed within their first year at Brown. The application form is available through the Office of the Registrar.

  3. Advancement to Candidacy. A student is advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. when he or she has satisfactorily completed all the requirements, departmental and general, requisite to beginning work on the dissertation. Candidacy is determined by the department or program of study and certified by the Registrar. Most departments require the completion of specified coursework plus passage of a preliminary examination or examinations or a qualifying paper before advancing any student to candidacy.

  4. Dissertation. The candidate must present a dissertation on a topic related to his or her area of specialization that presents the results of original research and gives evidence of excellent scholarship. The dissertation must be approved by both the professor or committee under whose direction it is written and by the Graduate Council. All requirements for the Ph.D. must be completed within five years after advancement to candidacy.

Financial Support for Graduate Study

The Graduate School at Brown University guarantees all incoming doctoral students five academic years of support, which includes a stipend, tuition remission, health insurance and health fee. Additionally, starting with the cohort that entered in the fall of 2010, students receive support for 4 summers (up from previously 3 summers). The support may take the form of a teaching assistantship, research assistantship, fellowship or proctorship. All such assignments form part of the student’s professional training and are viewed as integral to the student’s academic development. Beyond the 5th year, one additional year of stipend support may be available, but unless research funding is provided through the faculty advisor, any such award requires submission of a Dissertation Completion Proposal (DCP) in the spring semester of the 5th academic year (see the section below on Funding Beyond Year Five).

The guarantee of financial support only refers to the first five years of study in the Graduate School; it does not refer to years of support that can be used at any time, or that can be used in addition to external support. In some programs, students who enter with advanced course-work and a master’s degree are provided four years of support in recognition of their advanced status. All promises of student support are subject to students making satisfactory academic progress as determined by their programs of study.

The Graduate School coordinates with academic programs the type of activity (teaching assistantships, fellowships, etc.) that funds the students. All such appointments are made by virtue of the student’s status as a graduate student at Brown and are seen as an integral part of his/her academic training. The director of graduate study (DGS), in consultation with students and other faculty in the program, and the deans in the Graduate School, decides the most appropriate form of support for each doctoral student in a given year. The flexibility of this approach helps to ensure that, within the constraints of other departmental needs, doctoral students receive the type of appointment that is most appropriate for their current level of professional development and that will support their progress through the program. The Graduate School coordinates with those programs that support many of their students on external grants in order to determine exactly how to integrate the needs of graduate students with those of the faculty securing those grants, and the conditions of the grants themselves.

Doctoral Student Support Models

The Graduate School provides support for doctoral students through a variety of means, including fellowships, assistantships, and proctorships. The University’s faculty and graduate students are also very successful in securing graduate student support funding through outside sources; every year grants from such agencies and foundations such as the National Institutes of Health or the Mellon Foundation make significant contributions to the scholarship and research at Brown.

Invariably, the diversity of funding resources implies that funding models for supporting doctoral students vary by discipline. And even within a graduate program, support models are flexibly defined to accommodate the ebb and flow of external fellowships and grants. Keeping such variability in mind, an outline of typical support models is shown in the following table. In all cases, the support includes a stipend, tuition, the health services fee and health insurance.  In most cases, Graduate School support will be in form of teaching assistantship, a teaching fellowship, or an approved proctorship.  In some areas, students may also receive one, or at most two years of fellowship support through the Graduate School. Keeping such variability in mind, an outline of typical support models is shown in the following table.

Normative Funding Models

Discipline

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Humanities

F

TA

TA

TA or Externally- funded Fieldwork

TA or DF

Life Sciences

F

F / RA

RA

RA

RA

Physical Sciences

F/TA

TA/RA

RA

RA

RA/DF

Social Sciences

F

TA

TA

TA or Externally- funded Fieldwork

TA or DF

F = Fellowship
RA = Research Assistantship
TA = Teaching Assistantship
DF = Dissertation Fellowship

Note: When warranted by academic considerations, the student’s DGS may determine it to be advantageous to take the dissertation fellowship (DF) in a different year. Questions about the possibility of doing this in specific cases should be taken to the Dean of the Graduate School.

Graduate students have some measure of control over their individual funding model through the choice of research projects (in disciplines with external funding) and/or through garnering external fellowship support.

A limited amount of funding is available for sixth-year continuing students. Any such support is based on merit and awarded by the Graduate School upon submission of a Dissertation Completion Proposal. Any sixth-year support that includes a stipend will normally be as a Teaching Assistantship (see the section below on “Funding beyond year five”).

Teaching Appointments

Teaching is an integral part of graduate training in most doctoral programs at Brown. Students are expected to teach as part of their professional training and scholarly apprenticeship. Teaching assistantships and teaching fellowships are awards made by programs to students in good standing. Appointments are made by the Graduate School on the basis of departmental recommendations. Double work appointments are not allowed.

Since 1993 the standard language competency for a teaching assistantship has been determined by a panel evaluation or interview at Brown rather than by TOEFL score. Students whose native language is not English must pass a panel evaluation of their English before they may teach. Evaluations are performed by the program in English for International Teaching Assistants, which also teaches free, non-credit courses in pronunciation and the use of English in the classroom.

Students should consult freely with the faculty member teaching the course, with their DGS and with the staff of the Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning in developing teaching strategies. Students experiencing difficulty in the performance of their teaching duties may be referred to the Sheridan Center, but TAs should not wait until there are difficulties to seek advice.

Teaching Assistants

Graduate student teaching assistants (TAs) assist a faculty member both inside and outside the classroom on activities related to the teaching of a particular course. The nature of the tasks may vary depending on the teaching needs of the individual department. TA’s are supervised by a faculty member and do not bear primary responsibility for the design or implementation of a course.

The duties of a TA vary across courses and departments and may include some classroom teaching, the presentation of occasional lectures, leading discussion sections, preparing and supervising labs, conducting tutorials, holding office hours, and grading papers, problem sets, quizzes, and examinations.

Programs often assign graduate students to courses according to their interests and areas of expertise, broadly defined; however, a student’s teaching experience is greatly broadened by teaching assignments outside of the immediate area of expertise. A full appointment usually requires at least 18 hours of work per week, but should not exceed an average of 20 hours per week averaged over the course of the term.

Teaching Assistants receive tuition, health insurance, the health services fee, and a stipend.

Teaching Fellows

Teaching fellows are advanced students with teaching experience who are responsible for the design and teaching of their own course. Eligibility for Teaching Fellows varies across departments. Appointments are made by the Graduate School on the basis of departmental recommendations.

Teaching Fellows receive tuition, health insurance, the health services fee, and a stipend that is slightly higher than the stipend received by TAs.

Teaching While Receiving Support from External Funding

Teaching is an important part of the academic training students receive while at Brown. Therefore, students supported by external funding sources can be Teaching Assistants or Teaching Fellows unless the external source explicitly prohibits this practice. Students who are appointed as TAs or TFs while receiving external funding will not receive an additional stipend for the teaching assistantship, but the regular incentive funding scheme applies. Details of this policy are found in Appendix 1.

Research Assistants

Research assistants (RAs) work with faculty on academic and research projects, both at the University and in the field. More than any other type of support, RAs are tied to grant-related funding and are thus administered independently by each department and/or investigator. For more information, students should contact their department’s director of graduate study.

The time devoted to being a RA should not generally exceed an average of twenty hours per week, unless the research being conducted is integral to an RA’s dissertation related research.

Research Assistants receive a stipend, tuition, health insurance, and the health services fee. Appointments are made on an annual or semester basis on the recommendation of the department. Double work appointments are not allowed.

Proctors

Proctorships are non-instructional positions and are offered either through an academic department or degree program, or from other research, training, academic or administrative offices around campus. These positions are intended to foster the professional development and/or research interests of graduate students. Under no circumstances are proctors to be used for general administrative work.

Proctorships are awarded by the Graduate School and are subsidized whenever possible by federal work study funds. Proctors appointed outside of academic departments either provide assistance in the implementation of the appointing office’s ongoing programs, or they engage in other work (research, program development, projects, etc.) that is pre-approved and relevant to the appointing office’s academic objectives. Departmental proctors generally receive full tuition, health insurance, the health services fee, and a stipend; the specific financial terms of these awards will be determined at the time of the appointment. A full appointment should not exceed an average of 20 hours per week averaged over the course of the term.

Proposals from nonacademic departments for extra-departmental proctorships that are relevant to students’ professional development or research interests may be made to the Graduate School at any time. Ideally, such proposals will originate as the result of a consultation between a particular campus office and interested graduate student. Financial awards for extra-departmental proctorships are determined on a case-by-case basis.

All proctorship appointments must be proposed by the originating department or office and the director of graduate study in the student’s home department, and must be approved by the Graduate School. All applications must address the following issues in regards to the proposed proctorship:

  • Nature of the proctorship; what are the anticipated duties, tasks, and assignments of the proctor.
  • The prerequisite courses and/or skills will the proctor need to be successful in the position.
  • A description of the mentorship and supervision that will be provided to the proctor.
  • A description of the anticipated learning and/or professional development outcomes for the student.
  • A description of how the proctorship will allow the student to better compete in the job market and/or further the student’s academic goals.

Application forms for proctorships can be found on the Graduate School forms site here.

Scholarships

Some degree programs offer partial aid in the form of scholarships that can be used toward the student’s bill for tuition, the health services fee, and health insurance. These scholarships, some of which are offered with the students’ letters of admission, are awarded at the program’s discretion.

Fellowships

During the five years of funding guaranteed to graduate students, Brown University’s Graduate School awards a fellowship to first-year students and dissertation-level students in the fifth year. As an integral part of their academic training, all students are expected to serve in an academic appointment (e.g., teaching assistant or teaching fellow) in the other three years of the guaranteed funding years. Any exceptions to this model must be approved by the Graduate School. First-year fellows and fifth-year dissertation fellows normally receive full tuition, covering eight courses in the year, health insurance and health services fees, and a stipend.

External Fellowship Funding Information

The Graduate School strongly encourages students to independently seek external funding. Receiving a fellowship award is a sign of distinction and writing grant applications is an important part of a students’ professional development.

A database of funding opportunities along with additional information can be found here on the Graduate School website. The Graduate School offers informational workshops on fellowship opportunities each year and the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs is available for consultation on external fellowships. The Graduate School also provides regular external funding information to students via email.

The Office of Sponsored Projects (OSP) provides access to various sources of funding opportunities that can assist faculty, students, and administration in the identification of external support for research, education, and development projects.

External Fellowships Incentive Policy

The deans of the Graduate School believe that it is of fundamental importance that graduate students gain the recognition and the experience entailed in applying for, and winning, competitive grant funding. This experience will be a central part of post-graduate life, whether inside or outside of the academe. In order to encourage graduate students to gain this experience as part of their professional development and educational experiences at Brown, the Graduate School has created a policy to reward students who secure funding from sources outside the University. Details of this policy are found in Appendix 1.

Teaching and Research While on External Fellowship

The Graduate School supports the professional development of graduate students by providing teaching and research opportunities to, in particular, Ph.D. students. In most cases, students supported by external funding sources can be Teaching Assistants, Teaching Fellows, or Research Assistants unless the external source explicitly prohibits this practice. Students who are appointed as TAs or TFs while receiving external funding will not receive an additional stipend for the teaching assistantship, but the regular incentive funding scheme applies. Details of this policy are found in Appendix 1.

There may be cases where the program and the student are  uncertain about teaching or research constraints associated with a given external award. In these instances the Graduate School works with students and the relevant external funding agencies to determine the extent to which students who hold external awards can continue to participate in teaching and research opportunities at Brown.

Advanced Student Status

Students within the five year guarantee who have completed their 24 tuition-unit requirement and plan to be away from Brown for a semester or the academic year conducting dissertation research and who choose to defer Brown stipend support may apply for Advanced Student Status. Such students are considered full-time students, are charged tuition, health services fee, recreation fee, and the graduate student activity fee, and must have health insurance from Brown or provide proof of comparable coverage under another plan. 

Students who are interested in Advanced Status must write to their DGS to express their interest. The DGS will then communicate this to the Graduate School on the annual appointment form. Receipt of Tuition and Health Insurance Scholarships does not count towards the years of Graduate School guaranteed support.

Advanced Student Tuition and Health Insurance Scholarship Table

Financial Support

Advanced Student Tuition Scholarship

Provides 100 percent coverage of tuition.

Advanced Student Health Insurance Scholarship

Provides 100 percent coverage of annual health insurance fee.

Eligibility: (a) Funded advanced students conducting dissertation research away from Brown who opt-out of up to one year of Graduate School funding.

(b) Unfunded advanced students who have advanced to doctoral candidacy and are working on their dissertation. Students are eligible for a maximum of two semesters of Advanced Student Tuition Scholarship support.

Conditions: Students must be engaged in full-time dissertation research.

Summer Support

All recently admitted doctoral students are guaranteed a cumulative total of three or four months of summer support over their first five years in the program based on their year of entry into the graduate program (three months total for pre-2010 entering cohorts and four total for those entering in 2010 or later). Summer support that is provided by Brown is meant to augment, not replace any external funding won by the student. A student's summer support package could come from external funding, Brown-provided summer stipend, or some combination of the two. Guaranteed summer support is intended for students to conduct research, study for their preliminary examinations, work on their dissertations, and other scholarly activities.  The director of graduate studies may also assign a student to a teaching assistantship during the summer. All summer support funds are provided with the specific purpose to help students advance toward their degrees in a timely and efficient manner. Students should consult with the director of graduate study or the research advisor about projects for the summer months.

Students in the physical and life sciences are typically supported during the summers on grant and department-based funding. Students in the humanities and social sciences and a few other programs whose summer support is provided by the Graduate School may elect to use their guaranteed four (three) months of summer support at any time during their first four summers at the University. The default is one month of support following each of the first four (three) years of stipended academic year studies. Students should consult with the director of graduate study for department-specific rules.

Non-Performance

Students should be mindful of the fact that teaching, research, and proctorship appointments are part of their professional training. Such appointments establish a responsibility to the faculty and students within the academic unit. Performance in these appointments is also a component of a student’s academic review. Students who fail to perform in their funded Graduate School appointments (as RAs, TAs, fellows or proctors) can be terminated and their funding suspended under the following conditions:

  • gross negligence and failure to appear,
  • failure to complete work,
  • inappropriate behavior in the classroom or laboratory, or
  • violations of the Academic or Non-Academic Code.

Such students will have their funding terminated regardless of other indices of academic standing.

Grounds for termination must be presented in writing to the Graduate School in the form of an academic disciplinary procedure. The case will be heard by the academic disciplinary board. (See the Academic & Student Conduct Codes.) As with all such cases, the student has the right to appeal a decision.

Funding Beyond Year Five

Brown University’s 5-year support guarantee allows doctoral students to fully focus on their academic field without worry about their funding status. Additionally, the recently elevated levels of summer support help students to advance rapidly. That said, the 5-year support period should not be taken to imply that dissertation must be complete by the end of the fifth year. Instead, the five-year period defines the institutional guarantee of financial aid, in form of a stipend, tuition, health insurance and health fee.  Students wishing to continue their studies beyond year 5 can find support opportunities through specific research projects and various fellowships.

Additionally, for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences the Graduate School has set aside a budget for doctoral students beyond year five. Those Graduate School funds are pooled with departmental resources.  Details about the Dissertation Completion Proposal (DCP), for sixth year students, and the Dissertation Extension Proposal (DEP), for students beyond year 6, can be found here

Master’s Degree Programs

The Brown Graduate School awards master's degrees as terminal degrees or during ordinary progress toward a Ph.D. Master’s degrees awarded at Brown are the Artium Magistri (AM degree), commonly referred to as the Master of Arts degree, the Scientiae Magistri (ScM), commonly referred to as the Master of Science degree, Master of Public Affairs (MPA), Master of Public Policy (MPP), Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), and Master of Public Health (MPH). The minimum requirements for a master's degree are admission to the program and eight graduate-level courses, successfully completed. Individual departments and programs may have additional requirements regarding the number of required courses, proficiency in foreign languages, special examinations, and theses. All work to be used in fulfillment of the requirements for a master's degree must be completed within a period of five years.

Graduate work done in graduate residence at other institutions and may be offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master's degree, provided it is approved by the department or program and by the Registrar. Specifically, one post-graduate course may be transferred to an 8-course master's program; two courses may be transferred to a 14-course or greater master's degree.

Terminal Master’s Degrees

The Graduate School accepts applications for graduate study in over two dozen master’s degree programs. (A listing of current master’s programs can be found here on the Graduate School website.) Several of the these programs offer the highest degree available in their respective fields, such as the Master of Fine Arts in Literary Arts (MFA), or are explicitly designed to prepare students for positions in applied professions, such as the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) or the Master’s in Public Health (MPH). Other master’s degrees provide relevant professional training and preparation and/or may lead to subsequent study at the doctoral level at Brown or at another university.

Students who have been admitted into graduate programs that also offer a Ph.D. may apply to the Ph.D. program while they are enrolled as master’s students. These applications will be evaluated in the context of the all applicants to the respective Ph.D. program.

Program Structure and Matriculation

Every program has a pre-determined structure and pattern of matriculation. Deviation from the program structure and standard matriculation pattern by a student can affect time to completion and tuition cost. There can also be visa implications for international students who deviate from the standard pattern of matriculation. Examples of deviation are: adding an extra course, dropping a course, changing a course for credit to audit. Any student contemplating a deviation from the set program structure should first seek approval from the program DGS and the Graduate School. Additional information can be found here on the Registrar’s website.

Below is a table listing the standard matriculation patterns for all current master’s programs at Brown.

Table of Standard Matriculation Patterns by Program

Degree

Program

Number of Courses

Schedule of enrollment (entry to completion) [Each number represents the approved standard by semester]

AM

American Studies

8

4 + 4

ScM

Biomedical Engineering

8

2+2+2+2

AM

Biostatistics

8

3+2+2+1

ScM

Biostatistics

8

3+2+2+(1+Thesis Course)

ScM

Biotechnology

8

2+2+2+2

AM

Brazilian Studies

8

4 + 4

AM

BSSI

8

3+2+2+1

ScM

BSSI

9

3+2+2+2

AM

Classics

8

4 + 4

ScM

Clinical & Transitional Research

9

2+2+2+2+(1 summer)

ScM

Computer Science

8

2 + 2 + 3 + 1

AM

Development Studies

8

4 + 4

ScM

Engineering

8

3+3+2

AM

English

8

4 + 4

AM

Epidemiology

12

3+3+3+3 and thesis

ScM

Epidemiology

12

3+3+3+3 and thesis

EM

Healthcare Leadership

9

3+3+3 (18 month continuous)

AM

History

8

4 + 4

AM

Intergrative Studies (anthro)

8

4 + 4

MFA

Literary Arts

8

2 + 2 / 2 + 2 Can Audit 1 per sem for free/not for credit

AM

MCM

8

4 + 4

AM

Music

8

4 + 4

MFA

Playwriting

16

2+2 / 4+4  / 2+2

AM

Portugese & Brazilian Studies

8

4 + 4

AM

Portuguese-Bilingual or ESL Education and Cross-Cultural Studies

8

Candidates for this degree may be part-time or full-time. In the case of the former, candidates will be required to complete at least two courses per semester thereby enabling them to complete their requirements in two years.(default is 4+4 in 1 year) Often students take only 2 which = HT. Program typically limited to FT educators

ScMIME

PRIME

8

4 + 4

MPA

Public Affairs

16

4 + 4 + 4 + 4

MPH

Public Health

13

3 + 3 + 3 + 3 (an additonal 1 unit will be placed on semester in which they register for internship credit) Any registrations over 3 incur charge

AM

Public Humanities

14

 3+4+4+3

MPP

Public Policy

16

4 + 4 / 4 + 4

MAT

Teacher Education (Elementary)

8

1 summer + 4 fall + 3 spring

MAT

Teacher Education (Secondary)

8

2 (summer) + 2 + 4 OR 2 (summer) + 4 + 2

MFA

Trinity Rep. Acting or Directing

24

4 + 4 / 4 + 4 / 4 + 4

AM

Urban Education Policy

10

2 (summer) + 4 + 4    [5th years UG need 8 (2+3+3)]

AM

Urban Education Policy Teach for America 

8

1(summer) 2+2+2+1

5th-Year Master’s Degrees

The 5th-year master’s degree program (additional information found on the Graduate School website here) allows Brown undergraduates to continue at Brown for a master’s degree after completing their bachelor’s degree. Up to two courses taken as an undergraduate but not counted toward the undergraduate concentration may be counted toward the master’s degree, leaving six courses to be taken in the postgraduate year(s) (or fourteen in some two-year, sixteen course master’s programs) and only six tuition units to be paid (or fourteen in for a two-year program) for the usual eight (or sixteen) course degree. Students who use two undergraduate courses to count toward the master’s degree cannot transfer a graduate course taken at another school.

Students must apply for this program before they complete their undergraduate degree. Admission must be approved by the department in which the master’s degree is sought and by the Graduate School. While a student must be enrolled as an active undergraduate student at the time of application, admission to the graduate program can be deferred for up to two years with approval of the program.

Students should complete the associated forms and submit them, along with a copy of their internal record, to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

Master’s Degrees en route to the Ph.D.

Students enrolled in doctoral programs can, with the approval of their graduate program, earn the master’s degree en route to the Ph.D., as long as they do not already hold a master’s degree in the same field of study.

Sometimes a student enrolled for the Ph.D. decides to leave (or is terminated from the program) but will complete the master’s. In that case, the DGS should send a memo to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs recommending that the student’s degree program be changed to the appropriate master’s degree only.

Concurrent Ph.D./Master’s Degree

In addition to obtaining a master’s degree in the field of the Ph.D. on the way to the doctoral degree, it is possible, with approval of the directors of graduate study and the Graduate School, for doctoral students to earn a concurrent, terminal master’s degree from Brown in a program different from the Ph.D. program.[i] Degree requirements for a transitional master’s degree in the field of the Ph.D. and terminal master’s degree in a second field must be separately met; no courses or theses may be counted for more than one master’s degree.

Work on a concurrent master’s degree should be part of an integrated plan of study that leads to the Ph.D. in the student’s doctoral program. Approval of the plan of study for the concurrent master’s degree must be obtained from the directors of graduate study in both graduate programs prior to the end of the student’s second year at Brown or at least two semesters before the anticipated completion of the second master’s degree. Students seeking approval of a pursuing a concurrent Master’s degree while they are in a Ph.D. program are should obtain an application form from the Graduate School.

Concurrent Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree

In some exceptional circumstances students may combine their last year or two years of undergraduate study with graduate study to complete both a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in eight or nine semesters. More information on this concurrent degree, including a link to the application form, can be found here on the Graduate School website. 

Integrative Studies

Brown University has a long tradition of creating, encouraging and fostering interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary programs. The Graduate School is open to students who propose scholarly work that crosses disciplinary boundaries and cannot be accommodated within an existing program. Such students are eligible to file an application for a degree in integrative studies.

Ph.D. in Integrative Studies

To pursue an Integrative Studies PhD. students must be admitted to an existing doctoral program. After completing one full semester of full-time graduate study, students may apply for permission to enroll as a doctoral student pursuing integrative graduate study. The application process is the submission of a proposal to the Graduate Council for their review and decision. The proposal will include a self-designed plan of study, along with written statements of support by the DGS in the program to which the student was admitted and a faculty advisor(s) in the relevant field(s), and statements verifying the continuation of support in accordance with the five-year guarantee. The completed and signed proposal is submitted to the Graduate Council for their consideration and approval.

Only current graduate students enrolled in one of the regular graduate programs may apply for integrative graduate study. Students who are approved for a Ph.D. in Integrative Studies must designate a home program for administrative purposes.

Master’s in Integrative Studies

In exceptional circumstances, students may apply for permission to enroll as a Master’s student pursuing integrative graduate study. The application process depends on whether a student is already enrolled in a degree granting program at Brown.

For students who are already enrolled in a graduate degree granting program at Brown the application process begins with the submission of a proposal to the Graduate Council for their review and decision. This proposal should be submitted to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs who will take the proposal to the Graduate Council. The proposal will include a self-designed plan of study, along with written statements of support by the DGS in the program to which the student was admitted and a faculty advisor(s) in the relevant field(s). The proposal should include the degree type being requested (AM or ScM), and the degree type should be in conformance with the general degree requirements of the master’s program to which the proposed plan of study is most closely aligned (for example the program of the student’s primary advisor). The proposal must also specify the program structure regarding the timing of courses, and this program structure must also be in conformance with the timing of courses in the master’s program to which the proposed plan of study is most closely aligned (e.g., 8 courses taken as 4 + 4). In addition, a student’s enrollment status (full-time, half-time, or less than half time) in any given semester would also be determined in advance when aforementioned program structure is approved. The completed and signed proposal is submitted to the Graduate Council for their consideration and approval. Students who are approved for a Master’s in Integrative Studies must designate a home program for administrative purposes.

For students who are not already enrolled in a graduate degree granting program at Brown the application process begins with the prospective student developing a proposed course of study.[ii] The prospective student would then contact a potential advisor at Brown who would agree to the proposed course of study and agree to do the advising. Formal approval by the DGS of the advisor's program is also required. The proposal should include the degree type being requested (AM or ScM), and the degree type should be in conformance with the general degree requirements of the master’s program to which the proposed plan of study is most closely aligned (for example the program of the student’s primary advisor). The proposal must also specify the program structure regarding the timing of courses, and this program structure must also be in conformance with the timing of courses in the master’s program to which the proposed plan of study is most closely aligned (e.g., 8 courses taken as 4 + 4). In addition, a student’s enrollment status (full-time, half-time, or less than half time) in any given semester would also be determined in advance when aforementioned program structure is approved. Having secured the support of the prospective advisor and of the related DGS, the applicant would then submit these supporting letters, the proposed course of study, and regular application material to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for the Graduate School, who will take the proposal to the Graduate Council for consideration. The Graduate Council will serve as the de facto admissions committee for each applicant to a Master’s in Integrative Study. Graduate Council approval of the proposal is tantamount to the applicant being accepted into the program at Brown. Conditional upon approval by the Graduate Council, the prospective student would then make regular application through the Graduate School’s online application system. Once admitted, for administrative purposes the student will be assigned the program/department of their aforementioned advisor as their home program/department.

Directors of Graduate Study

Every department or program offering a graduate-level degree at Brown has a director of graduate study (DGS). Faculty members who act as the primary liaisons between graduate students, the faculty in their programs, and the Graduate School, DGSs are responsible for all graduate-related issues in their respective programs. DGSs are the primary point of contact for students on all issues related to admission, academic standing, funding and appointments, etc. They are responsible for the regular evaluation of their program’s students, and for notifying students in cases where there may be problems (see Academic Standing and Warning Policy). All official changes to graduate students’ academic or financial records require the signature of the program DGS.

An especially important responsibility of the DGS is to ensure that each graduate student in the program has an advisor at all points in his/her career. However, students should also be proactive in seeking advice from their faculty advisor/mentor, DGS, chair, as well as from their instructors and peers.            

Program Handbooks

Each graduate program at Brown is required to maintain a handbook that provides detailed and up-to-date information to students regarding the path toward their degrees. Handbooks must have a clear outline of all expected academic milestones, along with a timeline for their completion, teaching and language requirements, expectations regarding coursework, as well as detailed information on any and all other completion requirements. The program handbooks should also provide clear information regarding the consequences of failing to meet milestones and what opportunities exist for students to have a second chance to meet milestones. Each graduate program should revisit this document on an annual basis to make sure it is kept current. All handbooks must also be available electronically (via department websites). The Graduate School’s website has a link to each program where the program handbook can be found.

Written documents do not take the place of sustained, proactive advising, and it is the responsibility of department chairs, DGSs, and advisors to interact often and regularly with the graduate students in their programs.

Changes in Status

Any changes in a student’s status (i.e., leaves of absence, withdrawals, changes in degree program) should be sent by the DGS to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of the Graduate School. When the change reflects the changing or dropping of a degree program, a statement from the student acknowledging notice of the change must accompany the request.

Academic Standing and Warning Policy

Academic Standing

Students’ academic standing can be classified in four ways: good, satisfactory, warning, or termination. Each program’s director of graduate study is required to maintain an updated and comprehensive census of the status of each student in his/her graduate program. DGSs are also required to update students on a regular basis regarding their academic status; requirements for the scheduling of these notifications are below.

Students who are in good standing are making both good and timely academic progress. No more than one incomplete can be carried on a student record in good standing.

Satisfactory standing indicates that a student has encountered difficulties of some kind – inadequate performance or slow progress in coursework, research, writing, etc. Since TA or RA assignments form part of a student’s professional training, performance in those areas can also affect academic standing (see Financial Support for Graduate Study). Two or more incompletes will, at minimum, result in a shift from good to satisfactory standing. This status level has no immediate impact on funding. If the concerns impacting a student’s status are not resolved, the student will move on to warning status.

Warning status signals chronic or severe problems. Students on warning must be given a written notice of their deficiencies and the consequences of those deficiencies. Students must also receive clear, written instructions of the steps to be taken (if possible) to regain good or satisfactory standing, and date-specific deadlines (typically one semester) for recovery. Such notice must come at the end of every semester that a student is on warning status.

If the deficiencies are not resolved by the specified deadline, the student on warning moves to termination. Students will typically continue to receive funding in a probationary state during the specified time period. Warning can lead to an immediate removal of funding depending on the severity of the problem, but this occurs only in rare circumstances and only with the express approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.

Termination status signals severe and irrevocable problems. Termination indicates an immediate removal of matriculation/enrollment status, as well as all forms of financial support.

Deadlines for Evaluation and Notification

Enrolled students in good or satisfactory standing must receive an evaluation of their standing in the program at least once every academic year. First-year students and those on warning status must receive an evaluation at least once every semester. All students should also receive written notification immediately following the successful completion of each academic milestone in their program.

The Graduate School recognizes that each program needs to coordinate the timing of students’ evaluations with relevant decision points within their program, such as first-year project defenses, language exams, and qualifying exams. The deadlines listed on the chart on the following page should be understood to be the latest possible moments.

Depending on the severity of the problem, a student may be placed immediately on warning or termination status. In cases of extreme non-performance, a student can be terminated at the end of the current semester, but only with a special petition to the Dean of the Graduate School.

In all cases of unsatisfactory performance, attention should be given to the particular difficulties being faced by the student. The Graduate School Associate Dean for Student Life in the Office of Student Life is available to provide advice in these situations. Often, a leave of absence may be the best course of action.

Actions and Deadlines for Withdrawing a Student:

In order for a student to be withdrawn from the Graduate School for academic reasons…

Actions to be taken in or near the…

Fall Semester

Actions to be taken in or near the…

Spring Semester

Actions to be taken in or near the…

Summer

Actions to be taken in or near the…

Fall Semester

…before the start of the next summer:

Program puts the student on warning status on the basis of Fall semester performance.

Deadline for this warning: January 31 following the Fall semester.

Program conducts scheduled evaluation of Spring semester performance.

Deadline for this evaluation: May 31.

(If the student is to be awarded a master’s degree at the end of the semester, the decision must be made by May 1.)

 

 

 

…before the start of the next fall semester:

 

Program puts the student on warning status on the basis of Spring semester performance.

Deadline: May 31.

Program conducts scheduled evaluation of Summer performance.

Deadline: August 21.

 

 

… before the start of the next spring semester:

 

If the performance shortfall relates to course work, inability to carry out TA responsibilities, and/or academic year research:

Program puts the student on warning status on the basis of the Spring semester performance.

Deadline: May 31.

If the performance shortfall relates to research during the summer months and/or inability to carry out TA responsibilities:

Program puts the student on warning status on the basis of summer performance.

Deadline: August 21.

Program conducts scheduled evaluation of Fall performance.

Deadline: January 31.

Process of changing a student’s status to ‘warning’:

Program provides the student with a written notice of warning status that:

  1. outlines areas of poor performance,
  2. lists specific performance goals and deadlines,
  3. states the date of the evaluation, and
  4. indicates that the student will be terminated at the end of the specified time period if performance goals are not met.

The program provides this letter to the student, and a copy to the Graduate School, by the specified deadline.

Process of evaluating student:

The student and the program follow the schedule outlined in the warning letter. While it is possible for the warning status to be extended by one period, in most cases the outcome will be either of the following:

Positive outcome: student status is raised to ‘good’ or ‘satisfactory’.

Negative outcome: student is withdrawn from the Graduate School.

In case of a negative outcome, a written notice of withdrawal must be delivered to the student by the deadline, with a copy to the Graduate School.

The program also submits a withdrawal form to the Graduate School by the deadline.

The Graduate School sends an official letter of withdrawal from Brown to the student.

Notes:

  • With only rare exceptions that require the approval of the Dean, students will continue to receive funding while they are on warning. Students who are withdrawn before the end of the semester for academic performance reasons will continue to be supported until the end of the semester in which they are withdrawn. With the express approval of the Dean, warning can lead to an immediate removal of funding in the case of a severe infraction of the academic code or failure to satisfactorily complete the duties of the student’s appointment.

  • The level of funding for students on probation must comply with the Graduate School’s minimum funding levels. It is not required to sustain the higher levels that some departments set for their own programs.

  • The listed durations of the warning periods are minimum durations. When programs change a student’s status to warning, a program can also provide for a longer evaluation period.

Evaluation of Students with TA or RA Appointments Outside of their Home Program

As a part of the evaluation process, students who have a TA or RA appointment in a program outside of their home program should receive an evaluation of their performance at the end of each academic semester by the course instructor or research supervisor. A copy of the evaluation should be provided to the student and to the DGS in the student’s home program. The DGS in the student’s home program should review the report with the student and use it in the program’s annual evaluation of the student. With the student’s permission, a copy of the evaluation may also be made available to the student’s academic advisor.

Implications of Academic Standing and Academic Progress for Financial Aid and Student Loan Deferral Status

To be eligible for student loans, students must be enrolled and making satisfactory academic progress in their program. The student status in regards to “making satisfactory academic progress” is determined by the Graduate School in consultation with the program DGS and the Office of Financial Aid (if Federal Title IV Aid eligibility applies).

It is also the case that students must be enrolled and making satisfactory academic progress to maintain eligibility for repayment-deferral status for any existing federal student loans they hold. Following federal guidelines, the Registrar reports to the National Student Clearinghouse any student who falls below “half time” time status. The student’s program must inform the Graduate School in writing of all changes in status, particularly in cases where a student’s aid may be adjusted or terminated. Failure to do so will result in charges being applied to the department.

Visiting Research Fellows and Non-Degree Students

The Graduate School offers the Visiting Research Fellow and non-degree student statuses to accommodate visiting graduate students from other institutions and other non-degree students. The Visiting Research Fellow status is for graduate students from other institutions who would like to come to Brown for durations of usually less than 12 months to conduct research with a Brown faculty member. Visiting Research Fellows are not enrolled in classes and do not have official student status at Brown. They are required to have a faculty advisor at Brown who will supervise and direct their activities.

The non-degree (visiting) student status is for either a graduate student from another institution or for a non-affiliated post-baccalaureate who would like to enroll in a class or classes or needs official student status at Brown for visa or funding purposes. This is the appropriate status for a graduate student wishing to take a graduate course or courses at Brown without being admitted to and enrolled in a graduate program at Brown. Even though the applicant will not be enrolled in a program, he/she must notify a program that he/she wishes to take care courses in the program, and the program must approve. The non-degree (visiting) student begins the process by first communicating with the receiving program at Brown. Once this connection has been established the next step is the completion of an online application by the non-degree (visiting) student, stating the program with which he/she will be affiliated. The application will be sent to the program for their approval. All non-degree (visiting) students must obtain the written acknowledgement and permission of the affected department(s) in which the visiting student will be taking a course or courses and/or working with a professor or professors in the program. Upon program approval the application moves to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for the Graduate School for final approval.

The non-degree (probationary) student status is for applicants to graduate programs who have been admitted on a probationary basis, and will be considered for admission as a degree student after 1-2 semesters.

The non-degree (postdoctoral) student status is for postdoctoral students at Brown University who need to enroll in courses for credit as part of their training program.

Visiting Research Fellows

Visiting Research Fellows are enrolled in graduate programs at other institutions and come to Brown for durations of usually less than 12 months to conduct research in collaboration with a Brown faculty member. The Visiting Research Fellow appointment is for up to 12 months and the appointment must be renewed for a longer stay. Visiting Research Fellows are provided access to the library, an email account, and limited building access. Requests for Visiting Research Fellow status are made by programs to the Graduate School. Programs should submit a Visiting Research Fellow Appointment Request Form (available on the Graduate School website here), letters of endorsement by the program chair/director and the faculty member who will advise the visitor at Brown, and a copy of the student’s original appointment request to the program. The application packet should be sent via campus mail to the Graduate School at Box 1987. 

Visiting Research Fellows are required to provide proof of health insurance for the full duration of their stay at Brown well in advance of arrival either in the form of an insurance card, a signed letter on letterhead from the insurer stating coverage, or a receipt of payment from a short-term health insurance provider. Visiting Research Fellows who do not provide proof of coverage to the Graduate School will not have their Visiting Research Fellow appointment activated and will not be issued a Brown ID. 

Visiting Research Fellows from universities outside of the United States who are in need of a visa are required for visa purposes to provide proof of financial support well in advance of their stay. The Office of International Student and Scholar Services (OISSS) cannot provide assistance with a visa application without this material. 

Visiting Research Fellow Processing Table

 1. Applying

Applicants make a request for a Visiting Research Fellow appointment directly to the program. Programs may establish their own application requirements and evaluation criteria, but there should be an identified source of funding for the student and a faculty member who is willing to serve as an advisor to the visitor.

Prior to the student’s arrival at Brown, programs submit to the Graduate School Admissions Office a Visiting Research Fellow Appointment Request Form, letters of endorsement from the program chair/director and the applicant’s faculty advisor at Brown, and a copy of the applicant’s original appointment request.

The Graduate School issues an appointment letter to the applicant with a copy sent to the chair/director in the host program. Applicants are required to notify the Admissions Office by email or in writing of their acceptance of the appointment offer.

2. Acceptance

International applicants who need assistance from Brown in securing a visa are required to submit to the Graduate School proof of support at the time of acceptance. Failure to provide this material in a timely manner will delay the processing of visa requests.

3. Arrival

Upon arrival at Brown, Visiting Research Fellows should report in-person to the Admissions Office at the Graduate School to request activation of their Visiting Research Fellow status.

After reporting to the Graduate School, Visiting Research Fellows should report to the Brown Card Office to have their photo taken and to receive their Brown ID.

Note: Activation of Visiting Research Fellow status and the issuance of the Brown ID card is contingent upon prior submission of proof of health insurance and, in the case of international visitors, proof of financial support.

4. Payroll

Programs that wish to pay Visiting Research Fellows from faculty research grants or other sources should contact Accounts Payable in Controllers Office. In the case of international visitors, programs must coordinate with the Office of International Student and Scholar Services (OISSS) prior to the visitor’s arrival to ensure that the international Visiting Research Fellow may work, and that the appropriate visa is acquired for temporary employment.

Non-Degree Graduate Students

Non-degree graduate students are not candidates for any degree. They pay the student health services fee and the health insurance fee, and tuition by the course for any courses they take. Tuition scholarship may be provided on a case by case basis. Non-degree students are admitted for a limited time period, a semester or a year. If a non-degree graduate student is subsequently admitted to a degree program, his or her transcript will report on their initial “non-degree” status. Coursework done for credit as a non-degree student may be counted toward graduate degrees with the approval of the graduate program. All non-degree graduate students should be recorded and monitored by the Graduate School, and their progress monitored by the advisor, graduate program, and Graduate School deans.

The application requirements and conditions of the non-degree student status are summarized in the Non-Degree Student Information Table below. The procedural steps for non-degree student applications and processing are described in the Non-Degree Graduate Student Processing Table below.

Non-Degree (Probationary) Students

Students who are given non-degree probationary status follow the standard application process for admission to the Graduate School and apply to a degree program. Programs may chose to admit the applicant as a non-degree (probationary) student in order to better assess the student’s academic preparation before deciding upon admission as a degree student. Applicants to graduate programs who are admitted as non-degree (probationary) students are normally funded as non-degree students through external research or training grants, and must be evaluated for admission as a degree student at the start of their second semester at Brown. Non-degree (probationary) students who are subsequently admitted to a graduate program as a degree student are counted among the target number of entering students allocated to the graduate program by the Graduate School.

Non-Degree (Visiting) Students

Individuals who wish to come to Brown for one or two semesters as non-degree (visiting) students start this process by first contacting and obtaining permission from the affected department(s) in which the visiting student will be taking a course or courses and/or working with a professor or professors in the program. Having received prior approval from the department, the visiting student next completes an online application. The student completes the first page and the signature page of the on-line application for admission to the Graduate School.

Non-degree (visiting) students who do not enroll in regular courses are required to register for an independent or directed study with a faculty member in the host department and pay the assessed tuition charge. The independent or directed study is recorded on the student transcript and one credit is granted.

Non-degree (visiting) students may enroll in classes for credit. Non-degree (visiting) students who enroll in classes for credit are not required to enroll in an independent, but will be charged the standard per credit tuition fee.

The Graduate School offers a limited number of tuition scholarships for non-degree (visiting) students who are at Brown to conduct research with faculty members. The tuition scholarship covers the tuition associated with taking an independent or directed study. Requests for a tuition scholarship should be made by the host program to the Graduate School.

Non-Degree (Postdoctoral) Students

Postdoctoral students at Brown who wish to enroll in courses for credit need to apply for non-degree student status by completing the first page and the signature page of the on-line application for admission to the Graduate School. Postdoctoral applicants to the Graduate School should request their faculty advisor to submit to the Graduate School a letter requesting admission as a non-degree student along with the source of funding for tuition.

Non-Degree Graduate Student Processing Table

I. APPLYING

1.

a. Applicants to Degree Programs [ Non-degree (Probationary) Students]: The student follows standard application process to the Graduate School as a degree student. Special (probationary) student status is requested by the student’s degree program in instances where the degree program does not want to admit the student with multiple years of guaranteed support. At the start of the second semester, the degree program must decide whether or not to admit the student into the graduate program starting semester I of the following academic year. Special (probationary) students who are subsequently admitted into the degree program will count as one of the degree programs targeted number of new admissions.

Pays online Graduate School application fee.

b. Non-degree Student Applicants [Non-degree (Visiting) Students]: The prospective student first contacts the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) in the department where they plan to take courses or work with faculty. In the case of the latter, the prospective student locates a faculty advisor who agrees to supervise the student while at Brown. Upon receiving approval from the department DGS and/or faculty member, the student completes the first page and signature page of the online application for admission to the Graduate School. In the case of non-degree visiting students who plan on working with Brown faculty, the faculty member submits to the Graduate School a letter recommending that the student be admitted as a non-degree (visiting) student. The letter should specify the duration of the student’s appointment, the conditions of the faculty member’s advising relationship with the student, and if appropriate, any financial support that the faculty member will provide the student. Letters of recommendation should be addressed to the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Graduate School.

The student completes the first page and the signature page of the on-line application for admission to the Graduate School. The student should select “Non-degree” for degree type, and “special (non-degree)” for program.

Pays online Graduate School application fee.

c. Postdoctoral Students Taking Classes [Non-degree (Postdoctoral) Students]: Postdoctoral students wishing to take a Graduate course complete the first page and the signature page of the on-line application for admission to the Graduate School. The student should select “Non-degree” for degree type, and “special (non-degree)” for program.

The Director of Graduate Studies in the student’s host program or the Associate Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in the Division of Biology and Medicine, submits to the Graduate School a letter requesting admission as a non-degree student along with the source of funding for tuition.

Pays online Graduate School application fee.

II. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS

2.

a. Applicants to Degree Programs [Non-degree (Probationary) Students]: Same documents as applicants to degree programs.

b. Non-degree Student Applicants [Non-degree (Visiting) Students]: Non-degree (visiting) student applicants are required to submit a copy of their transcript from their current or most recent program. GRE scores are not required for students who apply directly for non-degree (visiting) student status.

c. Postdoctoral Students Taking Classes [Non-degree (Postdoctoral) Students]: The Director of Graduate Studies in the student’s host program or the Associate Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in the Division of Biology and Medicine, submits to the Graduate School a letter requesting admission as a Special Student along with the source of funding for tuition.

Transcripts, GRE, TOEFL are not required at the Graduate School.

III. ADMISSION TO BROWN

3.

a. Non-degree (Probationary) Students: Non-degree (probationary) student status is requested by the admitting department after the application has come into the Graduate School and been processed as an applicant to a degree program. Admissions staff will be informed on a case-by-case basis to adjust the applicant’s status from a degree student to a special (probationary) student.

b. Non-degree (Visiting) Students:

(i) Applicants first contact the program and/or faculty for approval. Prospective student then applies online filling out first page and signature page. Program and/or faculty letters of recommendation for non-degree (visiting) students are reviewed by the Graduate School.

(ii) Non-degree (visiting) applicants who are offered admission by the Graduate School are sent an admission letter from the Graduate School. International students who are admitted into non-degree (visiting) status must provide proof of financial support for the duration of their visit to the Office of International Student and Scholar Services.

Applicants who accept the offer of admission should return their acceptance card to the Graduate School.

Admitted non-degree (visiting) students who would like to stay in Brown University housing should contact the Office of Residential Life as soon as possible to request a room in the graduate student residential hall.

Upon arrival to campus the host program at Brown and faculty advisor are responsible for providing orientation to the non-degree student to Brown and the surrounding community.

c. Non-degree (Postdoctoral) Students: Postdoctoral students who wish to enroll in graduate courses are charged the standard per credit tuition fee.

IV. REGISTRATION

4.

a. Non-degree (Probationary) Students: Register in-person at the Office of the Registrar. Registration forms are signed by program Director of Graduate Studies or program advisor.

b. Non-degree (Visiting) Students: Register in-person at the Office of the Registrar.

Non-degree (visiting) students obtain a paper registration form from the Office of the Registrar and register for an Independent Study using the appropriate course number and section number for their host program and faculty advisory. The form is signed by the faculty advisor and taken to the Graduate School for the signature of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. The completed form is submitted to the Registrar.

Non-degree (visiting) students must enroll in a minimum of one course, sometimes an independent study course with a particular professor, and the visiting student will be charged tuition on a per course basis.

c. Non-degree (Postdoctoral) Students: Register in-person at the Office of the Registrar. Registration forms are signed by program Director of Graduate Studies or program advisor.

 

Non-Degree Student Information Table

Application process/
Application fee

Transcripts/
GRE/
TOEFL/
Proof of Support

Duration

Course enrollment/
Teaching

Brown health insurance and health services

Facilities

Application process:

(1) Non-degree (probationary)
Student follows standard application process for the Graduate School. Non-degree (probationary) student status is requested by the student’s degree program.

OR

(2) Non-degree (visiting)
Student locates faculty advisor. Faculty advisor submits recommendation for non-degree (visiting) student status to the Graduate School. Student completes first page of on-line application for admission to the Graduate School.

Application fee: (1) (2) Yes

 

Transcripts:

(1) (2) Transcripts from most recent graduate program required.

GRE: (1) Students who apply through standard application process must follow program requirements for GRE.
(2) Not required for students who apply directly for non-degree (visiting) student status.

TOEFL: (1) Same country-specific requirements for admittance to degree programs.
(2) Not required for students who apply directly for non-degree (visiting) student status.

Proof of support: International students who are admitted into non-degree (visiting) status must provide proof of financial support for the duration of the visit to the Office of International Student and Scholar Services.

Duration:

1-2 semesters

 

 

Course enrollment:

Students may enroll in classes for credit.

Registration: Students must register for the independent/directed study or courses in person at the Office of the Registrar.

Tuition: Students who enroll in classes pay full per credit tuition fees, unless other arrangements have been made.

Teaching: Students may be contracted to teach 1-2 courses per semester.
Sponsor pays for teaching stipend.

Health insurance:

Student must have Brown health insurance or provide proof of comparable coverage.

Health service fee:
Student is charged health service fee.

Student pays health insurance and health service fee, unless other arrangements have been made.

Student has Brown ID, email account, library privileges, access to university housing, and access to athletic facilities.

 

 


[i] The allowance for a master’s degree in a field that is potentially unrelated to the Ph.D. field was voted by the Graduate Council in the October, 2011 meeting.

[ii] This paragraph added to the Eleventh Edition following language approved by the Graduate Council in the November, 2011 meeting.