Key Pages:

Lantern Slides Home
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About Lantern Slides
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The Slides
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About the projector
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Projecting Some of the Slides
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Digitization
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Other Lantern Slide Sites
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Acknowledgments
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Archaeology in the 'Information Age'

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Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology


 

 

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology & the Ancient World
Brown University
Box 1837 / 60 George Street
Providence, RI 02912
Telephone: (401) 863-3188
Fax: (401) 863-9423
[email protected]

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The John Hay Library had a rather beaten-up, but still (miraculously) functional lantern slide projector. We set it up in the center of the table of the Bruhn Room on the second floor of the Hay, just the right type of surroundings for this sort of project. The lens had a fairly long thrown on it, and we ended up needing to move it much further back from the screen than we originally anticipated.

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The projector consists of five basic parts (going from left to right in the above photo): lamp house, condensing lens, slide holder, bellows, focusing lens. The lamp house (the black box portion) holds the bulb and a reflector to throw as much light as possible forward to the screen. The silver section is the condensing lens, which evens out all of the light coming from the lamphouse to fully illuminate the slide. The bellows (the red portion of the projector) prevents stray light from hitting the focus lens and keeps (like the lamp house) all of the light from the bulb going forward to the screen in a beam. Finally, the focusing lens (the brass section) is movable (as the bellows contracts or expands) and lets you focus the image.

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The lamp house had a chimney (the bulb produces a LOT of heat and the entire lamp house quickly becomes to hot to touch with bare hands), a set of doors on the rear, and a small side door with a window of red-tinted glass (for reasons utterly beyond me--its far too small of an opening to do anything useful to the bulb and even without the little tinted window, there is no doubt when the projector is on or off). The bulb is a 400W tungsten.

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With the condensing lens removed to show the slide holder (which did not quite hold all of the slides very well--this projector seems to be made for large slides than ours...

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