• Campus Culture

    Campus Culture

    Graduate students make up a quarter of Brown’s student population. Learn about our culture, distinctive 
    opportunities, and academic programs. Read about initiatives in doctoral education and support.

  • Leadership

    Leadership

    Andrew G. Campbell, the 15th dean of the Graduate School: We are deeply committed to the work of broadening participation in higher education and creating a more diverse and inclusive scholarly community.

  • GradCON 2019

    GradCON 2019

    More than 30 alumni shared insights at GradCON 2019. “Reach out to researchers to learn about their experiences and career paths; talk to people with a variety of titles. Gain strong communication skills in conveying complex research to non-technical audiences by taking opportunities to teach, give talks and write," says Anna Hartley ’13 PhD, Senior Research Scientist, Amazon.

  • Research Matters!

    Research Matters!

    Twelve graduate students explained the importance of their research at the Graduate School’s fourth Research Matters event. Topics ranged from oceans on Mars to creating privacy-preserving tools for blockchain. Read more.

  • Orientation 2019

    Orientation 2019

    Welcome! The Graduate School's incoming class of almost 800 students enjoyed sessions on thriving at Brown, gender inclusion, advising, wellness, professional development opportunities, as well as a resource fair and campus tours.

Skip to Navigation

News and Announcements

Student Research: With historians in Newport, PhD students preserve a crucial piece of African American history

thumbnail image

Doctoral students in archaeology, Alex Marko, Dan Plekhov and Miriam Rothenberg worked with the Historic Cemetery Advisory Commission in Newport, Rhode Island, to create an interactive map of God’s Little Acre, one of the oldest African and African American burial grounds in the country. It is the final resting place of untold numbers of individuals. Some were born across the Atlantic, others mere blocks away. Some died centuries ago, others just decades ago. Some were slaves, others business owners. The students are working with Newport’s Historic Cemetery Advisory Commission, whose mission is to preserve and revive their stories. Read more.

Student Research: Barnacles offer genetic clues on how organisms adapt to changing environments

thumbnail image

What genes help organisms survive in changing environments? As climate change impacts species across the planet, it’s a big question in basic biology. New research by a Brown research time, including doctoral student Joaquin Nunez, on barnacles may provide some answers. Barnacles are crustaceans, related to shrimps and crabs. After a brief period when they float freely around the ocean, barnacle larvae attach to a hard surface — a rock, a boat, a whale — and develop into adults. They build hard plates surrounding their bodies, which they can open to feed and to reproduce, and close protectively during low tide and other harsh conditions. Read more.

Student Research: How do zebrafish get their stripes? New data analysis tool could provide an answer

thumbnail image

The iconic stripes of zebrafish are a classic example of natural self-organization. As zebrafish embryos develop, three types of pigment cells move around the skin, eventually jostling into positions that form body-length yellow and blue stripes. Scientists want to understand the genetic rules that direct this delicate dance, and a new algorithm developed by Brown University mathematicians, including doctoral student Melissa McGuirl, could help them accomplish that. The algorithm, described in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is able to quantify various attributes of shapes and patterns, enabling scientists to more objectively test ideas about how zebrafish stripes — and potentially other developmental patterns — are formed. Read more.