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2013-14 Events Calendar


Fall 2013

September 25
Creative Medicine Series
"Medicine through a New Lens: Revolutionary Lessons from the Works of Frederic Chopin"
Lecture and performance
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

Modern day medicine faces unprecedented turmoil: increasing healthcare costs, limited resources, and the implementation of new regulatory procedures. Members of the healthcare community struggle to find ways to interpret this constant change within the world of medicine. Outside the world of medicine however, there are so many individuals that can provide a unique perspective of how chaos can blossom into revolutionary change. This presentation-performance by Steven Rougas, MD, will interpret the evolving changes in healthcare through the lens of one composer, Frederic Chopin, and his journey with sadness, mourning, success, and death. A true revolutionary of his time, Chopin’s life works weave a story of adaptation, evolution, and discovery—all critical steps in the path towards a better understanding of modern day medicine.

Steven Rougas, MD is an Emergency Medicine physician at Rhode Island Hospital and The Miriam Hospital. As an undergraduate he double-majored in Biochemistry and Music Performance with a focus on classical piano. He went on to complete medical school and residency training in Emergency Medicine at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

A copy of the poster.

Visit the photo gallery of this event.


September 26
"Sulamith und Eusebia: A Musical Exegesis on Judaism, Christianity, and Unity in Variety"
Lecture
12:00 - 1:30pm
Pembroke Hall 202
172 Meeting Street

Speaker Yael Sela-Teichler, Teaching Fellow in Advanced Judaic Studies, University of Pennsylvania, discusses the only elegy written in memory of Moses Mendelssohn that was set to music – the 1786 cantata Sulamith und Eusebia – probably the first musical work by a German Jew, and that to a libretto by a Protestant poet. Construing the piece in counterpoint with some of Mendelssohn’s own writings, Sela-Teichler illustrates how it engages with and interprets Mendelssohn’s aesthetic, political-theological, and language philosophy, performing in words and music his utopian design of Judaism as a universal enlightened religion. Her discussion ultimately underscores the incompleteness of the historical moment that engendered the piece - a singular if brief moment of Christian-Jewish encounter at the outset of German modernity in late eighteenth-century Berlin.


October 8
"Verdi at 200"
Panel discussion
7:00 - 8:00pm
Granoff Center/Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street

Panelists include Dana Gooley, Music Department; William Keach, English; Gianluca Scandola, Cameristi della Scala; Michael Steinberg, Cogut Center for the Humanities. Chaired by Suzanne Stewart-Steinberg, Comparative Literature/Italian Studies.

A copy of the poster.


October 8
"Fantasies on Verdi's Operas"
Live performance
8:15pm
Granoff Center/Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street

In a celebration of the bicentennial of Giuseppe Verdi's birth, the Cameristi della Scala offers an 'autobiographic journey' of the composer's life through performances from his most famous operas. Included in the program are selections from Il Trovatore, La Traviata, Don Carlo, Aida and Falstaff in orchestral transcriptions by Camillo Sivori, Antonio Bazzini, Luigi Mancinelli and Giovanni Avolio.

This performance directly follows the panel discussion (see above) on "Verdi at 200."

More information about the Cameristi.

A copy of the poster.


October 9
Creative Medicine Series
"Plotless Stories and Poor Historians:  Hypochondria's Challenge to Illness Narrative"
Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

The non-fiction “illness narrative,” or patient pathography, is a genre subject to some clear conventions: the author-narrator is usually a patient who is, at some point in the narrative, diagnosed with and then treated for a disease, and who narrates a story about the experience of being ill, being treated, and negotiating what follows, be it cure, management, or the approach of death. Such stories tend, then, to be shaped by medical as well as narrative expectations: readers assume the patient is really sick, and the disease course follows one of three likely medical plots: acute, chronic, or progressive. But what happens when the narrator is a hypochondriac? This talk explores the way hypochondria, as pathography without disease told by narrators without credibility, unsettles the usual assumptions about how both patients and doctors employ and narrate illness and disease.

Speaker Catherine Belling researches contemporary fears of disease and of health care, connections between anxiety and interpretation in fiction, medicine, and bioethics, and disciplinary questions surrounding the medical humanities as an academic field. She is the author of A Condition of Doubt; On the Meanings of Hypochondria (Oxford University Press, 2012).

A copy of the poster.

Rescheduled from March 2013.


October 15
"Ndiphilela Ukucula: I Live to Sing" (81 mins., English)
Film screening and discussion with filmmaker
5:30 - 7:45pm
Sidney Frank Hall/Markuvitz Auditorium
185 Meeting Street

Nearly two decades after the end of apartheid in South Africa, the nation struggles to fulfill the promise of a transformed society. Ndiphilela Ukucula: I Live to Sing, follows three gifted African singers studying at the University of Cape Town (UCT), in a new feature-length documentary by filmmaker Julie Cohen about the power of art to change perceptions and transform lives.

These three singers were heard and enjoyed, along with their fellow cast members, in the June 2011 presentation of Le Nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro) brought to Brown by the Cogut Center.

A copy of the flyer.

Cosponsored by the IE/Brown Executive MBA program, Continuing Education and the Cogut Center.

Watch a short video on two of the featured singers and the opera school at UCT, produced by the United Nations.


October 18
"Heritage, Society and the South African State"
Lecture
12:00 - 2:00pm
Pembroke Hall 202
172 Meeting Street

Speaker Daniel Herwitz, Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professor at the University of Michigan, holds an honorary position at the University of Cape Town. His most recent book is Heritage, Culture, and Politics in the Postcolony (Columbia University Press, 2012). He is also the author of The Star as Icon: Celebrity in the Age of Mass Consumption. From 1996 to 2002, he served as chair in philosophy at the University of Natal, Durban and was embroiled in the South African political transition, which led to his book Race and Reconciliation: Essays from the New South Africa.

Seating is limited. Arrive early.

A copy of the poster.


November 14
"Laments without Borders: Composing Loss in the German Democratic Republic, 1979-1989"
Lecture
5:00 - 6:30pm
Pembroke Hall 202
172 Meeting Street

Speaker Martha Sprigge, postdoctoral fellow in the Michigan Society of Fellows and assistant professor of Music and German Studies at the University of Michigan, examines commemorative works written by a generation of East German composers who came into renown in the final decades of their country's existence. Educated in the early years of the German Democratic Republic, these composers were among the first generation "home grown" artists in a socialist state now on the brink of decline. Prof. Sprigge focuses on their musical contributions to official rituals of commemoration that indelibly marked the East German experience, to show how these composers used the space of public performance to express alternative narratives of loss to those promoted by the state.

Seating is limited. Arrive early.

A copy of the poster.


November 15-16
"Political Concepts at Brown: A Critical Lexicon in the Making"
Conference
9:00am - 6:15pm
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

An ongoing project, "Political Concepts: A Critical Lexicon" takes as its goal to serve as a platform for revising, inventing, and experimenting with concepts while exploring the political dimension of their use and dissemination. The project's participants operate under the assumption that our era urgently needs a revised political lexicon that would help us better understand the world in which we live and act, and that the humanities at large can and should contribute toward such a revision. In the past, some of the participants revised key political concepts while others showed the political work done by terms and common nouns that are not usually considered "political."

Scholars from all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences are invited to re-think and re-articulate concepts they are working with or to construct new ones that seem necessary for their work.

Speakers include: Ariella Azoulay, Brown University; Étienne Balibar, Columbia University and Université de Paris X; Nathaniel Berman, Brown University; Eduardo Cadava, Princeton University; Federico Finchelstein, The New School; Bonnie Honig, Brown University; Andreas Kalyvas, The New School; A. Kiarina Kordela, Macalester College; Jacques Lezra, New York University; Kevin McLaughlin, Brown University; Elias Muhanna, Brown University; Adi Ophir, Tel Aviv University/Brown; Linda Quiquivix, Brown University; and Ellen Rooney, Brown University.

Panel chairs include: Jay Bernstein, The New School; Susan Bernstein, Brown University; Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia University; Barrymore Bogues, Brown University; Stathis Gourgouis, Columbia University; Michael Steinberg, Brown University; Suzanne Stewart-Steinberg, Brown University; and Ann Stoler, The New School.

For more information on this conference.

A copy of the poster.

See the photo gallery for this event.

View the videos of these sessions.


November 19
"FWJ Schelling's Deities of Samothrace"
Lecture
5:30pm
Pembroke Hall 202
172 Meeting Street

In 1815, at the height of his powers, Schelling delivered an address to the Bavarian Academy of Sciences on the ancient Greek mystery cult practiced on the island of Samothrace. He later added a long series of notes to his lecture—more than doubling its length—and published it. The Deities of Samothrace is remarkable for a number of reasons: first, it represents the high point of Schelling's systematic philosophy and points to his plans for future work; second, it is one of the most compelling accounts we have of the cult of the Cabiri and "the Great Gods"; third, the issues it raises have much to do with contemporary discussions in archaeology, history of religion, theology, philosophy, and feminism.

Speaker David Krell, Visiting Professor in German Studies and Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Cogut Center, is the author of The Tragic Absolute: German Idealism and the Languishing of God (2005), and Contagion: Sexuality, Disease, and Death in German Idealism and Romanticism (Indiana, 1998).

Seating is extremely limited. Please arrive early.

A copy of the poster.


December 2
"Inconsequence: Some Little Known Mutinies Around 1946"
Lecture
5:30pm
Brown/RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street, 2nd Floor

Speaker Leela Gandhi is Professor of English at the University of Chicago. Her research and teaching focus on transnational literatures (particularly the legacies of colonial encounters between India and England), postcolonial theory, and intellectual history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She is the author of many publications, including the soon-to-be-published The Common Cause: Postcolonial Ethics and the Practice of Democracy, 1900-1955 (University of Chicago Press).


December 7
"Bach, Shapiro, Gorecki"
String quartet recital
4:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

Community MusicWorks offers an afternoon concert featuring selections from Johann Sebastian Bach (Art of the Fugue), Henryk Gorecki (String Quartet No. 1), and premiering Gerald Shapiro's String Quartet No. 3.

CMW Players include Chase Spruill and Lisa Barksdale, violins; Sebastian Ruth, viola; and Adrienne Taylor, cello.

A copy of the poster.

More about Community MusicWorks.


December 11
Beethoven Concert
Piano recital
12:30 - 1:30pm
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

Pianist and composer Benjamin Nacar '12 performs Opp. 109, 110 and 111 by Ludwig van Beethoven in a free lunchtime concert.

A copy of the flyer.


Spring 2014


January 27-28
"Reconsidering Hannah Arendt"

January 27
Hannah Arendt (2012)
Film screening
Markuvitz Auditorium, Sidney Frank Hall
185 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:30pm

Actress Barbara Sukowa stars in this biopic of influential German-Jewish philosopher and political theorist Hannah Arendt. Arendt's reporting on the 1961 trial of ex-Nazi Adolf Eichmann in The New Yorker—controversial both for her portrayal of Eichmann and the Jewish councils—introduced her now-famous concept of the "banality of evil." Using footage from the actual Eichmann trial and weaving a narrative that spans three countries, director Margarethe von Trotta turns the often invisible passion for thought into immersive, dramatic cinema.

Followed by Q&A with screenwriter Pamela Katz.

January 28
Roundtable discussion
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
12:00 - 1:30pm

With Ariella Azoulay, Comparative Literature; Ted Bogosian, Cogut Center; Bonnie Honig, Modern Culture and Media/ Political Science; Pamela Katz, screenwriter; Adi Ophir, Cogut Center; and Michael Steinberg, Cogut Center.

A copy of the poster.

See a video of the roundtable event.


January 31
"Martin Luther King in Berlin"
Panel discussion
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

This conversation reflects on Martin Luther King, Jr.'s significant but under-examined 1964 visit to West and East Berlin. King managed to cross into East Berlin without a passport and spoke to immense crowds on both sides of the Berlin wall. He spoke urgently about segregation in the US, the Berlin wall, divided societies worldwide and the importance of emphasizing a "common humanity."

Discussion will be led by Taylor Branch, author of The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement. Discussants include Tricia Rose, Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA); Michael Steinberg, Cogut Center; and Andre Willis, Visiting Professor, Religious Studies.

Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America and the Cogut Center.

A copy of the poster.


February - Entire Month
"We...the Divan"
Photography exhibit
Pembroke Hall - 1st Floor
172 Meeting Street

This exhibit is the work of Georges Yammine, who joined the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra (WEDO) in 1999 as violinist. In 2008, he began development of his photo project "We...the Divan", while he was travelling with WEDO and Maestro Daniel Barenboim equipped with two instruments: a violin and a camera.

Five years later, We...the Divan was published in book form on the occasion of Maestro Barenboim's 70th birthday. Since 2009, Georges Yammine has been a member of the Qatar Philharmonic Orchestra and works as a freelance photographer.

Visit a photo gallery of this exhibit.


February 5
"Schwanengesang"
Live performance
Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street
8:00 - 9:30pm

Austrian baritone Wolfgang Holzmair and pianist Russell Ryan perform Franz Schubert’s final work, a group of 14 songs published posthumously under the title "Schwanengesang" (Swan song). Not a typical song cycle, the work contains settings of three poets, Ludwig Rellstab (1799-1860), Heinrich Heine (1797-1856) and Johann Gabriel Seidl (1804-1875). Published in early 1829 just a few months after the composer's death, the title (attributed to the publisher, not the composer) refers to the old legend that before it dies, the swan sings the most beautiful song.

Seating is limited. Reservations may be made here.

Visit a photo gallery of this event.


February 12
Creative Medicine Lecture Series
"Discovery, Diagnosis and Dignity: Interpreting Narratives of Health and Justice"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall
172 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:00pm

Doctors and lawyers both engage in a process of discovery, diagnosis and retelling of the patient or client’s story in order to interpret the “truth” and promote health and justice. In medicine and in law, the professional interpretive process results in fitting the patient’s or the client’s story into a universalized narrative – the diagnosis or the legal claim. But often the patient or client’s own narrative of health or of justice is lost through this narrow technical translation. How can a literary approach to medical and legal narratives help to maintain the dignity of the patient or client’s voice as well as illuminate where health and justice may meet in the telling?

Speaker, Liz Tobin Tyler, JD, MA is a Clinical Assistant Professor of both Family Medicine, and Health Services, Policy and Practice. She is also the co-director of the Scholarly concentration in Advocacy at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

This lecture is part of the 2013-14 Creative Medicine Lecture Series.

A copy of the poster.


February 21
"Prisons of Stone, Word and Flesh: Medieval and Early Modern Captivity"
Symposium
Pembroke Hall
172 Meeting Street

If, following the thought of Michel Foucault and others, the prison is an essentially modern invention, how can we best conceptualize captivity in the time beforehand? Historical records of the medieval and early modern period (~400 - 1800CE) offer countless examples of human bondage, including the capture and detention of prisoners of war and the voluntary submission of hostages, as well as evolving forms of punitive incarceration. During the same time, art and literature are replete with depictions of imprisonment, often employed as a master metaphor for concepts like erotic love or mankind's enslavement to the Devil and the body. Being held against their will even seems to have been something of a rite of passage for numerous medieval and early modern authors (e.g., Marco Polo, François Villon, Charles d'Orléans, Thomas Malory, Cervantes) who found in various forms of captivity the time and inspiration necessary to create some of the most enduring works of western literature.

This symposium brings together scholars from a wide variety of disciplines in order to share new methodological and theoretical approaches to medieval and early modern captivity, and to examine the relationship of captivity to cultural production in the period.

Adam J. Kosto, professor of History, Columbia University, and author of Hostages in the Middle Ages (Oxford University Press, 2012), will be the keynote speaker with his talk "UnLiberty: Towards a Not-So-Grand Unified Theory of Captivity" at 5:30pm at Pembroke Hall 305.

Concurrent panels will run throughout the day in various locations within Pembroke Hall. Please check the conference schedule.

Visit a photo gallery of this event.


April - Entire Month
"My Friend is Mine: The Photography of John Dugdale"
Photography exhibit
Pembroke Hall
172 Meeting Street
Exhibit Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:30am - 5:00pm

How does photography illuminate friendship, not only between human beings, but between objects and things across temporal divides? What does one see or not see when one looks upon things? And what role does photography play in imagining queer love as a historical affect? In the exhibit My Friend is Mine, seventeen classic cyanotypes, toned silver prints and gelatin chloride prints by John Dugdale form the core of a month-long exhibit and one-day symposium that centers on his aesthetics, techniques, and life philosophy. Indeed, Dugdale’s interest in nineteenth-century photography becomes the starting off point for considering how alternative, non-digital models of image visualization and production might turn us to an earlier century’s own radical story of photographic emergence, a story which coincides with the quiet acknowledgment of the image as a gift that brings past, present, and future into remarkable queer adjacencies and constellations.

More information on the work of John Dugdale.

A copy of the poster.

A photo gallery from this event.

Co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Humanities Initiative, the Departments of English and History of Art and Architecture.


April 2
"My Friend is Mine: The Photography of John Dugdale"
Symposium
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
3:30 - 5:30pm

This symposium seeks to (re)turn to photography as a form that continues to engage scholars in the humanistic disciplines, inflecting ethical, aesthetic, and political reflections that testify to a world subject to vision. How can we think about the concepts of gender and sexuality at this moment, and what is the place of photography in queer studies? What forms of attention must be established for dealing with HIV/AIDS on the level of the image?

Photographer John Dugdale, Jonathan Katz (Visual Arts, SUNY/Buffalo), Douglas Nickel (History of Art and Architecture), Stuart Burrows (English), and convener Jacques Khalip (English) address these and other questions related to John Dugdale's work and photography as a medium.

A copy of the poster.

A photo gallery from this event.

A video of the symposium.

A exhibit of John Dugdale's photographs is available for viewing throughout the month of April at Pembroke Hall during office hours. The text from the exhibit.

Co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Humanities Initiative, the Departments of English and History of Art and Architecture.


April 23
Creative Medicine Lecture Series
"Renovating the Brain"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:00pm

Speaker Jon A. Mukand, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at Warren Alpert Medical School, will read a chapter (about an Iraq veteran with a brain injury) from his book-in-progress titled Renovating the Brain. Author of The Man with the Bionic Brain and Other Victories Over Paralysis, he has an MD from the Medical College of Wisconsin, an MA in Creative Writing from Stanford, and a PhD in English literature from Brown. He edited Articulations and Vital Lines, anthologies of poetry and short fiction about medicine, and Rehabilitation for Patients with HIV Disease. Dr. Mukand is also a faculty member at Tufts as well as medical director of the Southern New England Rehabilitation Center.

A copy of the poster.


May 5
Noontime Concert
Live Performance
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
12:30 - 1:30pm

Pianist and composer Benjamin Nacar '12 will perform a program of JS Bach (French Suite no. 5), L Beethoven/F Liszt (Pastoral Symphony, movement 1), R Strauss (Fűnf Klavierstűcke, op. 3), F Schubert/C Tausig (Marche Militaire).

A copy of the flyer.




Co-sponsored Events

September 18
"Fight the Future: Finance, Poetry, Value"
Lecture
5:30pm
Department of English/Barker Room
70 Brown Street

Speaker Joshua Clover, professor of English, University of California/Davis addresses revising traditions of political economy, especially Marx, that speak of the "fictitious" quality of capital. He argues that the appropriate literary frame for thinking through the problem of value is not fiction but poetry. Such a model shifts the terms in which we understand the instability of value - from discourse to time. By such means we may hope to make more legible the current situation of crisis, and the unfolding future. Prof. Clover is the author of a number of books of criticism, including The Matrix (BFI, 2005) and 1989: Bob Dylan Didn't Have This to Sing About (University of California Press, 2009).


September 26
"Pedagogies of Nation: Repertoires of Post/Colonial Jamaican Performance"
Lecture
6:30pm
Churchill House/Bass Performing Arts Space
155 Angell Street

Speaker Honor Ford-Smith is a Jamaican theatre scholar, playwright, actress and poet. She was the founding Artistic Director of Sistren Theatre Collective and taught at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Kingston, Jamaica for many years. Included in her current research/performance work is the "Letters from the Dead" Project, which engages with memory, urban violence and performance.  

Final event of the 2012-13 Brown Graduate International Colloquium: "Mobilizing Performance: Identity and Self-Making in Black Women's Aesthetic Practices."


October 17
"Songs of Freedom and the Emancipation Proclamation"
Concert
6:00 - 7:30pm
Granoff Center/Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street

"Searching for Freedom" features the Marian Anderson String Quartet's original musical works based on Negro spirituals.

The Marian Anderson Quartet's bold music-making embraces the classical tradition and infuses it with the richness of the African-American experience. The quartet, named for the celebrated contralto who shattered racial barriers, was the first African-American ensemble in history to win a major classical music competition. Their repertoire includes rarely heard classical compositions by Black composers and contemporary arrangements of Negro spirituals.

Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies, and the Cogut Center.

Part of Brown University's Celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation.


October 17
"You Have to be a Terrible Monster to Write"
Lecture
6:30 - 8:00pm
Brown/RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street, 2nd floor

Speaker Amitava Kumar, professor of English at Vassar College is an award-winning cultural critic and journalist born in Ara, Bihar. Kumar is the author of Husband of a Fanatic, Bombay-London-New York, and Passport Photos. Recently, his book Evidence of Suspicion was published under the title A Foreigner Carrying in the Crook of His Arm a Tiny Bomb. In his review of this book in the New York Times, Dwight Garner described it as a "perceptive and soulful" meditation on "the cultural and human repercussions" of the global war on terror.

Part of the Great Brown Nonfiction Writers' Lecture Series 2013-14.


October 18-19
"Slave-Citizen-Human"
Graduate Student Colloquium

Papers presented around issues related to the history of human bondage as well as more contemporary concerns regarding modern day human trafficking.


October 23
"The Comedy of Betrayal"
Lecture
5:30pm
Department of English/Barker Room 315
70 Brown Street

Speaker Joseph Litvak, professor and chair of English at Tufts University, has written widely on victorian fiction, literary theory, and film and has authored several books including, most recently, The Un-Americans: Jews, the Blacklist, and Stoolpigeon Culture. In this talk from his book-in-progress, Litvak discusses the cinematic and theatrical genre that he calls the comedy of betrayal.

In advance of Joseph Litvak's lecture, a screening of Martin Scorsese's The King of Comedy will take place in the Department of English/Barker Room 315 on October 22, 12 - 2:00pm.

A copy of the poster.


October 25-27
"Nature and Freedom in Kant"
Conference
Complete conference schedule
Alumnae Hall/ Crystal Room
194 Meeting Street

No philosopher has thought as deeply about the relation between nature and freedom as Immanuel Kant. Few philosophers have thought as deeply about the philosophy of Immanuel Kant as Paul Guyer, professor of Philosophy at Brown. This conference is being held in honor of Paul Guyer, convening eminent thinkers to consider together nature and freedom in the philosophy of Kant.

Speakers include Paul Guyer, Brown University; Karl Ameriks, University of Notre Dame; Barbara Herman, University of California/Los Angeles; Rolf-Peter Horstmann, Humboldt University, Berlin; Patricia Kitcher, Columbia University; and Allen W. Wood, Indiana University.

A copy of the poster.


October 31 - November 2
"Late Literature in the Sixth Century: East and West"
Conference
Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street

Several dozen scholars from the US and Europe convene to explore the literature produced in the Latin West and the Greek East in the sixth century CE. This conference grows out of the contacts created in 2011, when Brown hosted a much larger conference on late Latin literature attended by thirty participants, representing four continents and over a dozen countries. Convened by Joseph Pucci, Classics.


November 1
"Of Big Ears and Bondage: Benjamin, Kafka, and the Static of the Sirens"
Lecture
12:00 noon
Maddock Alumni Center/Brian Room
38 Brown Street

Speaker Michael Levine, professor of German and Comparative Literature at Rutgers, is the author of A Weak Messianic Power: Figures of a Time to Come in Benjamin, Derrida, and Celan (Fordham, 2013); The Belated Witness: Liteature, Testimony, and the Question of Holocaust Survival (Stanford, 2006); and Writing Through Repression: Literature, Censorship, and Psychoanalysis (Johns Hopkins, 1994).

A copy of the flyer.


November 7
"Pastoral in Palestine"
Slideshow/Lecture
6:30pm
Faunce Hall/Petteruti Lounge
75 Waterman Street

For decades, Israel and Palestine have been locked in ongoing conflict over land that each claims as its own. The conflict is often considered a calculated land-grab, but this characterization does little to take into account the myriad motivations that have shaped it in ways that make it seem intractable, from powerful nationalist and theological ideologies to the more practical concerns of the people who live there and just want to carry out their lives without the constant threat of war.

In 2011, speaker Neil Hertz lived in Ramallah in Palestine’s occupied West Bank and taught in Abu Dis, just outside Jerusalem. With Pastoral in Palestine, he offers a personal take on the conflict. Though the situation has resulted in the erosion of both societies, Hertz could find no one in either Israel or Palestine who expressed much hope for a solution. Instead, they are resigned to find ways to live with the situation. This slideshow/talk puts a human face to politics in the Middle East.

A copy of the flyer.


November 11
"Brown Alumni Writers' Forum"
Brown/RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street
3:00 - 4:30pm

Forum with Brown alumni Sandra Allen '09, Andrew Marantz '06.5, Nathan Schneider '06, and Erica Schwiegershausen '13.

Co-sponsored with English


November 21
"Not Me: Creative Nonfiction with the "I"
Lecture
6:30 - 8:00pm
Brown/RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street, 2nd floor

Speaker SL Wisenberg is the author of The Adventures of Cancer Bitch and Holocaust Girls: History, Memory and Other Obsessions.

Part of the 2013-14 Great Brown Nonfiction Writers' Lecture Series.


December 6
Indigenous Performance
Day-long Workshop
9:00am - 5:30pm
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

Speakers include Ines Hernandez Avila, University of California/Davis; Beverley Diamond, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Murielle Borst-Tarrant, author; Joshua Tucker, Brown University; William Yellow Robe, University of Maine; Edgar Teodoro da Cunha, Universidade Estatal Paulista; Lani Teves, University of California/Berkeley; Paja Faudree, Brown University; and Krista Van Vleet, Bowdoin University.

The day's schedule.

Part of the 2013-14 Lectureship Series: "New Perspectives on Native and Indigenous Studies in the Americas."


Spring 2014


Aldus Journal of Translation
Aldus is Brown University's Undergraduate Journal of Works in Translation. They publish translations into English from any language, in any genre, from any time, and from any place, as well as essays on the art of translation.


February 19-20
2014 Chinese Film Festival


February 19
Film screening and Q&A with film director
6:00pm
Granoff Center/Martinos Auditorium
Award-winning Hong Kong director Tammy Cheung will be on campus for screenings of two of her films, "Speaking Up" and "Village Middle School."

February 20
Informal conversation with film director
12:00pm
Salomon Hall 203
Tammy Cheung returns to speak about her unique career path, "from prison guard to documentary director."

Film screening and Q&A
6:00pm
Granoff Center/Martinos Auditorium
Screening of "Cheung Chau Diary," a film by several young directors. Filmmaker Tammy Cheung will be available for Q&A after this screening as well. 

Co-sponsored with East Asian Studies


February 25
"Science Writing"
Lecture
Brown/RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street
6:30 - 8:00pm

Part of the 2013-14 Great Brown Nonfiction Writers' Lecture Series, essayist, novelist and physicist Alan Lightman, currently a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), will talk about science writing.

Co-sponsored with English


February 26
"Iranian Rhythms"
Musical talk
Grant Recital Hall
1 Young Orchard Avenue
4:00 - 6:00pm

One of the series of events held with visiting scholar and performer Mohsen Namjoo.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


February 28 - March 1
"Beasts, Monsters and the Fantastic in the Religious Imagination"
2014 Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference
Keynote address delivered by John Lardas Modern, Franklin & Marshall College

Full schedule of talks
Co-sponsored with Religious Studies


March 1
"Cognition, Neuroscience, and the Arts"
All day conference
Smith-Buonanno Hall 106
95 Cushing Street

Speakers: Bevil Conway, Neuroscience and Visual Art, Wellesley College; Alva Noë, Philosophy, University of California/Berkeley; Alan Richardson, English, Boston College; Rebecca Saxe, Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; G. Gabrielle Starr, English, New York University.

Copy of the poster.

Co-sponsored with English


March 12
"Shahram Shabpareh: Honesty and Minor Scale"
Musical talk
Grant Recital Hall
1 Young Orchard Avenue
4:00 - 6:00pm

One of the series of events held with visiting scholar and performer Mohsen Namjoo and legendary Iranian pop star, Shahram Shabpareh, exploring the ongoing legacy of performance, music and ideal.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


March 12
"Immortal Inequalities: Towards a Critique of Futurist Discourse"
English Graduate Student Lecture
Hillel Chapel
5:30pm

Speaker: Donna V. Jones, University of California/Berkeley

Co-sponsored with English


March 14
"Our Imperfect Judiciary: A View from the Newsroom"
Salomon Hall 003
College Green
3:00 - 5:20pm

As part of the 2013-14 Great Brown Nonficition Writers' Lecture Series, retired New York Times reporter William Glaberson will describe how reporters can penetrate government institutions to understand and explain them.

Co-sponsored with English


March 17
"Injustice and the Dubious Value of Anger"
Lecture
Salomon Hall 001
4:00 - 6:00pm

Although everyone is familiar with the damage anger can do in both personal and public life, people tend to think that it is necessary for the pursuit of justice. Isn't it servile not to react with anger to great injustice, whether toward oneself or toward others? On the other hand, recent years have seen three noble and successful freedom movements conducted in a spirit of non-anger: those of Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Nelson Mandela. This lecture, delivered by Martha Nussbaum, Ernst Freund Distinguished Service professor of Law and Ethics, University of Chicago, argues that a close philosophical analysis of the emotion of anger can help us to see why it is of dubious value in both life and political action. 

Co-sponsored with Philosophy


March 18
"Jaffa"
Film screening
Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
111 Thayer Street
6:00 - 8:00pm

Screening of the film "Jaffa", followed by a conversation with the director, Eyal Sivan. Based on photographic and cinematographic documents, some going back as far as the 19th century, Eyal Sivan's film shows the orange groves at a time when Arab Jaffa was one of Palestine's most populated and thriving cities. This film narrates the visual history of the famous citrus fruit originated in Palestine and known worldwide by centuries as "Jaffa oranges." Jaffa's orange is one of the symbols that helped build the Zionist discourse about Palestine: a "desert we have made bloom."

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


April 1
"The Art of Secularism: The Cultural Politics of Modernist Art in Contemporary India"

Lecture
Smith-Buonanno 106
3:00 - 5:00pm

Speaker Karin Zitzewitz, professor of Art, Art History and Design at Michigan State University, addresses the social context of the production of visual culture in India where secularism has increasingly become a site of concern for modernist artists. Discussant is Vazira Zamindar, Religious Studies, Brown.

Co-sponsored with Religious Studies


April 3
"Insect Poetics: Personification and Animacy from Grainger to Dickinson"
Lecture
Smith-Buonanno Hall, 106
95 Cushing Street, Pembroke Campus
5:30pm

Speaker Monique Allewaert, professor of English, University of Wisconsin/Madison, is the author of Ariel’s Ecology:  Personhood and Colonialism in the American Tropics, 1760-1820 (University of Minnesota Press, 2013).

Co-sponsored with English.


April 4-6
"Subjectivity and the System"
Graduate student conference

Keynote speaker Jeremy Varon, author of Bringing the War Home: The Weather Underground, the Red Army Faction, and Revolutionary Violence in the Sixties and Seventies, teaches at the New School.

Co-sponsored with History


April 6-7
"Zionism as a Cultural Movement"

April 6
10:45am
Keynote address
- free and open to the public
"Reflections on Zionism and Writing: Literature in an Ideological Context"
The speaker is Israeli writer Ronit Matalon, author of The Sound of Our Steps (2008) and Uncover Her Face (2005).

April 6
7:30pm
Performance
- free and open to the public
Israeli Classical Music
Chamber music performed by musicians Yossi Arnheim, principal flutist, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra; Lotem Beider, viola, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra; Irena Friedland, piano, Israel; Claire Meghnagi, soprano, Israel. Opening remarks by Oded Zehavi, University of Haifa.

April 7
9:00am
Conference - open to members of the Brown community only
"Ideology, Politics and Culture - The Zionist Case"
Full details on the conference.

All events will take place at Pembroke Hall 305, 172 Meeting Street.

Co-sponsored with Judaic Studies


April 9
"East and West: Low Pitch and High Pitch"
Musical talk
Grant Recital Hall
1 Young Orchard Avenue
4:00 - 6:00pm

One of the series of events held with visiting scholar and performer Mohsen Namjoo, explores western Christian music and eastern Islamic music through an examination of pitch.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


April 10
"Béla Tarr: The Politics of Post-Soviet Cinema"
Colloquium
Pembroke Hall 305
2:00 - 6:00pm

Discussions of the Hungarian film director Béla Tarr typically divide his work into the pre-1989 cinema of a militant filmmaker, grappling with the problems of socialist Hungary, and the post-1989 work of a mature artist, characterized by disenchangement and contemplation. Jacques Rancière's recent book Béla Tarr, the Time After strongly and compellingly rejects this narrative. This colloquium will feature Rancière, returning to this theme, along with András Bálint Kovács, acclaimed scholar of Eastern European cinema and one of the foremost interpreters of Tarr's work, and Eva Cermanova, who is writing a doctoral thesis on Béla Tarr at Princeton University.

Co-sponsored with Comparative Literature


April 24
"Bottom-Up Place Making: Graffiti-Murals and Latino/a Urbanism"
Lectures and demonstration
Hunter Lab (BERT 130), Carmichael Auditorium
85 Waterman Street
6:00 - 9:00pm

Celebrated Los Angeles-based graffiti writers will discuss the practice of painting unsanctioned graffiti-murals as well as related issues such as creative place-making, occupying public space, identity and the role illicit, creative and contestative aesthetics play in the process of neighborhood change. Convened by Cogut Center Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow Stefano Bloch.

Conversation will be followed by a live art painting and reception.

Co-sponsored with the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.


May 1-2
"Embedded! Archaeologists and Anthropologists in Modern Landscapes of Conflict"
Workshop
Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
111 Thayer Street

In recent decades, both archaeologists and anthropologists who work in the precarious war zones in the Middle East have been increasingly drawn into collaborations with western and local military forces via initiatives such as the so-called Human Terrain Systems, adopting military technologies for accessing data about otherwise inaccessible places, and accepting funding from the military for field research. These developments intersect with a cultural/social scientific turn in the US military. Likewise, in recent years, several new archaeological projects have been initiated by western archaeological teams in war-torn countries. This workshop will provide a platform for an open and critical discussion of the ethical implications of archaeological and anthropological fieldwork in conflict zones in the Middle East, collaborations with the military and what it means to be embedded in the military complex in both the contemporary and the historical contexts.

By invitation only.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


May 10
"When you are talking about Iranian Fusion, what are you talking about?"
Concert and reception
Grant Recital Hall
1 Young Orchard Avenue
7:00pm

One of the series of events held with visiting scholar and performer Mohsen Namjoo. The concert will be a fifteen-song exploration of the way in which fusion is revolutionising the ways Iranians address social change through music.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies