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Hannah Arendt Seminars

Partnering with the Pembroke Center and the Watson Institute for International Studies, the Cogut Center co-hosts The Hannah Arendt Seminars. This multi-semester series of events celebrates the work of renowned German philosopher and political theorist Hannah Arendt and honors the centennial of her birth. The series brings noted scholars from within and outside Brown together for lectures, workshops, film screenings, and other events to explore issues pertaining to the humanities, the study of women and gender, and international studies. All Hannah Arendt Seminars are free and open to the public, although registration may be required for those events with limited seating.

Spring 2007

January 30
Seminar
"The Rights of the Stateless: A Case in Point"

Crystal Room, Alumnae Hall
194 Meeting Street
Brown University
12:00 - 2:00 pm

Professor Judith Butler will convene a discussion of her essay "Israel/Palestine and the Paradoxes of Academic Freedom" (Radical Philosophy, 2006) and Hannah Arendt's "The Decline of the Nation-State and the End of the Rights of Man" (The Origins of Totalitarianism, 1951).

Seminar seating is limited to 25; pre-registration is required. Readings will be made available to registered attendees. It is expected that each attendee will have read the papers and will be ready to discuss them in this seminar format.

Lunch will be provided.


January 30
Lecture
"Hannah Arendt and the End of the Nation-State?"

Crystal Room, Alumnae Hall
194 Meeting Street
Brown University
5:00 pm

Judith Butler
Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley

Prof. Butler will speak as part of the Cogut Center's ongoing Hannah Arendt Seminar series which is devoted to topics involving the humanities, feminist and gender studies and international studies.

Reception to follow.


March 6

"War in the Thought of Hannah Arendt"

Joukowsky Forum, Watson Institute
111 Thayer Street
Brown University
4:00 - 6:00 pm

Patricia Owens
Department Lecturer in Strategic Studies in the Department of Politics and International Relations, and Seton Watson Research Fellow in International Relations, Oriel College, University of Oxford

Author of Between War and Politics: International Relations and the Thought of Hannah Arendt (OUP, 2007), Patricia Owens says, "Hannah Arendt’s writing was fundamentally rooted in her understanding of war and its political significance. But this element of her work has surprisingly been neglected in international and political theory."

Prof. Owens holds graduate degrees from Cambridge University and the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. She has also held research positions at Princeton University, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Southern California.


April 3

"Die Tausend Augen des Dr. Mabuse"
(The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse)

List Art Center, Room 120
64 College Street
Brown University
6:00 - 7:30 pm

Free screening of a little-seen cult classic, Die Tausend Augen des Dr. Mabuse was the last film ever made by the great Fritz Lang (Metropolis, M, The Big Heat). This fascinating thriller combines elements of film noir, horror, and science fiction. Gert Frobe (Goldfinger) stars as police commissioner Kras, trying to uncover the sinister secret of the mysterious Hotel Luxor, ground zero for a massive crime wave. The crimes show all the hallmarks of evil genius Dr. Mabuse--but he died 30 years ago!

In German with English sub-titles.


April 4

"Anxious Cinema:  Surveillance as Narrative Form"

Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
111 Thayer Street
Brown University
7:30 - 9:00 pm

Distinguished Visiting Fellow Thomas Y. Levin, Associate Professor of German at Princeton University will discuss Fritz Lang's 1960 film classic, The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse ("Die Tausend Augen des Doktor Mabuse ").

Prof. Levin's research interests range from the history of aesthetic theory and Frankfurt School cultural theory to the history and theory of media (archaeologies of vision, Early German Cinema, Weimar Cinema, New German Cinema, rhetoric of new media).


April 5

"Watching Watching: Surveillant Intermediality in Fritz Lang's The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse

Watson Institute, McKinney Room
111 Thayer Street
Brown University
12:00 - 2:00 pm

As a follow-up to his lecture of April 4, Thomas Y. Levin, Associate Professor of German at Princeton University will a close-reading of Fritz Lang's 1960 film classic, The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse (" Die Tausend Augen des Doktor Mabuse "). It is strongly suggested that registrants view the film (see listing on April 3) before attending the seminar.

Seminar seating is limited to 25; pre-registration is required. Contact Humanities_Center@brown.edu.

Lunch will be provided.


April 5

"Um passaporte Húngaro" (The Hungarian Passport)
2001, 35mm, color, 72 min.

MacMillan Hall, Starr Auditorium, Room 117
Brown University
7:30 -9:00 pm

This film, in Portuguese, French, and Hungarian with English subtitles, chronicles Brazilian director Sandra Kogut's frustrating and often hysterical attempts to jump through the bureaucratic hoops necessary for her to obtain a Hungarian passport. On the way, she explores a painful family history of forced emigration and a hidden legacy of anti-Semitism as she confronts some essential questions: What is nationality? What is a passport for? What should we do with our heritage? How do we construct our history and our own identity?

The screening will be followed by a discussion with the director.


April 6

"The Foreign and the Familiar: Selected Moments in Video and Film"

Watson Institute, McKinney Room
111 Thayer Street
Brown University
12:00 - 2:00 pm

This seminar will examine the complex interweavings of documentary and fiction in selected short works by Sandra Kogut. Despite the seeming heterogeneity of a prolific output that ranges from her early prize-winning works in experimental video and installation art (in Brazil, USA, Japan, Africa and the Soviet Union) to films shot in the poor neighborhoods of Rio de Janeiro and in a remote region of the Pyrenees in France, to more recent commissions such as a study of visitors at the Musée D'Orsay in Paris, there is a consistent focus and an equally sustained refusal of classical generic conventions that mark Kogut's fascinating ouevre. This will emerge over the course of the seminar in which the filmmaker will screen and discuss a number of short works (all with English subtitles).

Seminar seating is limited to 25; pre-registration is required. Contact Humanities_Center@brown.edu.

Lunch will be provided.