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Graduate Students

Emanuela Bocancea
Emily Booker
Sarah Craft
Andrew Dufton
Pinar Durgun

Müge Durusu-Tanriover
Linda R. Gosner
Laurel Darcy Hackley
Katherine Harrington
Susan Herringer

Samantha Lash
Kathryn McBride
Kelly Nguyen
Jessica Nowlin
Ian Randall

Miriam Rothenberg
Alexander Smith
Catherine Steidl
Jennifer Thum
Clive Vella

 
Emanuela Bocancea
Status: ABD
Emanuela received a B.A. (First Class Honours) in Classical Studies (2007) and an M.A. in Classical Archaeology (2009) from the University of Alberta. Her past fieldwork has included Greece (Kastro-Kallithea), Romania (Porolissum), and Menorca (harbor of Sanitja). Her current fieldwork includes survey and excavation at Petra, Jordan (Brown University Petra Archaeological Project) and on the island of Montserrat (Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat Project). Emanuela’s many research interests include the army and frontiers of the Roman Empire, the archaeology of the Roman provinces, the cult of Mithras, ancient colonialism and imperialism, Roman epigraphy, Roman social history, and ancient slavery. Her dissertation comparatively examines the creation of the last two Roman provinces, Dacia and Arabia, from the 2nd - 3rd centuries CE.

 
Emily Booker
Status: Second Year
Emily received a double B.A. in Classical Civilizations and Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations from the University of California, Berkeley (2013). She graduated with high honors for a thesis concerning the socio-economic implications of Cypriot cylinder seals during the Late Bronze Age, which suggest the rise of new elites in trade-focused centers. Her experience ranges from educational outreach at the San Diego Museum of Man, independent research at the British Museum, ceramic analysis at the American Academy in Rome, and fieldwork with the Dhiban Excavation and Development Project, Jordan and the Busayra Cultural Heritage Project, Jordan. Her main academic interests lie in international ties, trade, and communication, particularly in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age, through a combination of archaeological, art historical, and textual analysis of materials. She plans to continue focusing her research in the eastern Mediterranean, including Anatolia, the Levant, and Cyprus.

 
Sarah Craft
Status: ABD
Sarah graduated from DePauw University with a double B.A. in Latin and Ancient Greek and a minor in Classical Archaeology (2007). Since 2005, she has surveyed in Antalya, Mersin, and Manisa provinces in Turkey, excavated in Sicily, and spent 2008-2010 in Çorum province, Turkey, working on the GIS for the Avkat Archaeological Project. She received a critical language scholarship (CLS) from the US State Department to learn Turkish in Ankara, Turkey, in the summer of 2007, then worked as an intern for the Collaboratory for GIS and Mediterranean Archaeology (CGMA) at DePauw. In 2012, she joined the Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (BUPAP) team. Her dissertation project, begun as a 2011 summer fellowship in Byzantine Studies at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, and tentatively entitled "Dynamic Landscapes: Travel Infrastructure and Early Christian Pilgrimage," explores the intersection of landscape archaeology, GIS technology, and contemporary texts in understanding how and with what impact people moved through their landscapes, with a particular focus on the late Roman and early Byzantine landscapes of Anatolia. As a Junior Fellow at Koç University's Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations (RCAC) in Istanbul, Turkey, for the 2012-13 academic year, she is continuing her investigation of how travel infrastructure 'on the ground' shaped -- and was in turn shaped by -- the practice of pilgrimage itself.

 
Andrew Dufton
Status: ABD
Andrew received a B.A. (Honours) in Anthropology from McGill University in 2003 and went on to complete an M.Sc. in GIS and Spatial Analysis in Archaeology from University College London (2005). Following this second degree Andrew worked for six years within the British commercial sector and was involved in all aspects of archaeological fieldwork: survey, excavation, project management, digital archaeology, and community involvement. During this time he surveyed and developed an online data system for the Villa Magna Project (2006-2010), and was a founding member of the Day of Archaeology (2011-2013). Since coming to Brown, he has participated in the Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (2012-2013), the Pantelleria Excavation Project (2012), the Brown University Labraunda Project (2013), and the Tunisian-British Utica Project (2012-2013). Andrew's research interests include the beginnings of urbanism in North Africa, and the impact of these early cities on later Punic and Roman colonization. Building on his experience within the Digital Humanities, he is also interested in the potential of new digital technologies within archaeological practice as a tool for reaching both academic and non-academic audiences.

 
Pinar Durgun
Status: Third Year
Pinar graduated from Bilkent University's Archaeology Department in 2010. During her undergraduate studies, she worked as a short-term intern at the Anatolian Civilizations Museum in Ankara (2009) and participated in the Ephesus Crisler Library Archaeology Camp (2009). Her field experience includes one season at Kinet Hoyuk (2008), and she has been part of the Bilkent University excavation project Hacimusalar (2009-2011). She receieved her MA from Koc University's Archaeology Department's Anatolian Civilizations and Cultural Heritage Management Program with the concentration area "Archaeology and Archaeological Sciences" (Istanbul-Turkey). For the summer of 2013 she joined Brown University's Yalburt Yaylasi project. Although her interests include prehistoric mortuary practices, as well as cultural heritage management, her primary interest is Anatolian and Aegean Prehistory (especially the Early Bronze Age). Her MA thesis focuses on the theoretical and practical approaches to the Anatolian Early Bronze Age site Demircihöyuk's cemetery, settlement and social organization. Pinar is a Fulbright grantee for 2013-2014.

 
Müge Durusu-Tanriöver
Status: ABD
Müge received her B.F.A. in Landscape Architecture and Urban Design from Bilkent University (Ankara, Turkey) in 2006. She completed her M.A. degree in the same university, this time in the Department of Archaeology and History of Art, in 2010. In her M.A. thesis, she focused on the Late Bronze – Early Iron Age transitional landscapes of the Upper Euphrates area and the Amuq Plain. Müge joined Brown in 2010, and was a Fulbright grantee for the 2010-2012 academic years. Her field experience includes excavating in the mound of Hacimusalar with Bilkent University (2008-2009), surveying in coastal Cilicia as part of the Mopsos Project of Penn State University (2007-2011), and in Manisa with the Boston University team for the CLAS project (2012). Since 2011, Müge has been a core member of the Yalburt Yaylası Archaeological Landscape Research Project, where she works on the analysis of second millennium BCE material culture. Müge's dissertation focuses on the Hittite Empire, and tries to re-envision the empire by looking at it from its edges. She studies a combination of material culture, texts and architectural space to ask questions on the diachronic histories of the different regions in the empire, and how these regions responded to the rise of an imperial power in Anatolia. Müge's other interests include archaeological theory, heritage ethics, and landscape archaeology.

 
Linda R. Gosner
Status: ABD
Linda received her undergraduate degrees from the University of Arizona, including an Honors B.A. in Classics and Anthropology with minors in Spanish and Near Eastern Studies (2008), and an Honors B.F.A. in Dance (2007). After college, she spent a year in Portugal as a Fulbright scholar researching at the Museu Nacional de Arqueologia and earning a certificate in Portuguese at the Universidade de Lisboa. Linda also worked for several years during and after college at the Arizona State Museum as a curatorial assistant. She has done fieldwork – including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis – in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey – most recently with Brown's projects at S'Urachi (Sardinia) and Labraunda (Turkey). Linda studies Roman archaeology with interests in the social and technological aspects of production, the ancient economy, household archaeology, archaeological ethics and theory, and museum studies. Her current research focuses broadly on the social and economic impact of Roman conquest and colonization of the Iberian Peninsula, with special attention to the changes that took place in local communities in the rural and industrial landscapes of the countryside. Her dissertation examines mining communities in Iberia, investigating changes and continuities in daily life, production practices, and economic interaction in and around mines exploited before and after Roman conquest of the peninsula.

 
Laurel Darcy Hackley
Status: First Year
Darcy received a B.A. in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Wellesley College (2007) and a M.A. in Egyptology from the American University in Cairo (2014). She has worked as an illustrator and archaeologist at many sites in Egypt, including the Red Monastery, Sohag, the Temple of Mut, Luxor, the Valley of the Kings, Abydos, and Kharga Oasis. She also excavates at Cadir Hoyuk in Turkey. Darcy’s main research interest is Middle Kingdom Egypt, especially the material culture of the period and the symbolic and religious value of things and materials. She has additional interests in ancient production and technology, international trade in luxury goods, mining and mineral resources, and materials science.

 
Katherine Harrington
Status: ABD
Katherine received a B.A. in Classical Archaeology from Dartmouth College in 2006, and completed the post-baccalaureate program in Classical Languages at the University of California, Davis in 2009. She has done fieldwork in Greece at the Athenian agora excavations (2005-09), ancient Corinth (2013), the Sanctuary of Ismenian Apollo in Thebes (2012-14), and Olynthos (2014). She has also worked in Jordan with the Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (2010-11) and in the Caribbean with Brown's Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat project (2011). Katherine's research focuses on the archaeology of daily life in the Greek world during the Archaic through Hellenistic periods. Specifically, she is interested in domestic space and household archaeology, as well as craft production and the domestic economy. Her dissertation will investigate the intersections of these two topics in the sphere of household industry and domestic production. Katherine's other interests include archaeological science, digging circular features and floor surfaces, and dig dogs. In 2013-2015, she is co-leading a Mellon Graduate Student Workshop with Linda Gosner, entitled "Daily Deeds and Practiced Patterns: Approaches to Studying Daily Life and Habitual Practices in the Ancient World.”

 
Susan Herringer
Status: ABT (Archaeology); ABD (Engineering)
Susan received her B.A. in Chemistry (highest honors) and Art History in 2009 and her M.A. in Chemistry in 2010 from Clark University. In the summer of 2008, she split her time between working in a synthetic chemistry lab for her honors thesis and working on the Antiocheia ad Cragum Archaeological Reconstruction Project in Güney, Turkey. With interests in both the sciences and in cultural heritage research, Susan began her studies at Brown University seeking to form a bridge between the engineering and archaeology departments. As a member of the first cohort of the Open Graduate Education Program, she is pursuing her doctoral degree in engineering materials science and her master's degree in archaeology. She has spent two summers surveying (ground and geophysical) with the Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (BUPAP). Her research focuses on neutron applications in cultural heritage research, which she undertakes at a national laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN. Her interests in reverse engineering materials encompasses such topics as production technology, technological choice, and cross-craft production.

 
Samantha Lash
Status: Second Year
Sam graduated with a BA in Classical Archaeology (High Honors) and a minor in Biological Anthropology in 2012 from the University of Michigan. Her undergraduate honors thesis aimed to reconcile papyrological and archaeological data from a granary in Karanis, Egypt; exploring methodological issues as well as reanalyzing archival data. She completed a Masters in Classical Archaeology from the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology at University of Michigan in 2013. Sam has worked in the field for five seasons with the Gabii Project in northern Latium, Italy. Recently, she has worked on Brown University’s projects at S’Urachi (Sardinia) and Notion (Turkey). Her developing work emphasizes the collective impact of individuals’ movement within consistent trade, labor, and production networks. This includes consideration of how quotidian activities and behaviors can be identified both within permanent settlements and among mobile peoples. Sam’s interests also include the development of settlement sites in Central Italy, the identification of urbanization and abandonment processes in the archaeological record, material spatiality, papyrology, Greco-Roman domestic and industrial architecture, formation and deposition processes, and the utilization of geochemical methods in archaeological practice.

 
Kathryn McBride
Status: ABD
In 2006, Kathryn graduated with honors from Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa with a B.A. in History and Ancient Mediterranean Studies. She studied Egyptology for a semester at the American University in Cairo and her undergraduate thesis at Coe focused on the ethnic and cultural relationships within Ptolemaic Egypt. She graduated with an M.A. in Classics with an emphasis on archaeology from the University of Arizona in 2008, and her Master's thesis there also concentrated on Egypt, this time on the iconography used by the Ptolemaic Queens. From 2009 to 2011, she taught History and Humanities at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. Fieldwork has taken her to Greece (Mt. Lykaion), Egypt (South Asasif and Abydos), Jordan (Petra), Turkey (Alalakh) and Israel (Omrit), and in 2013 she attended the Eric P. Newman Graduate Summer Seminar in Numismatics. Kathryn's main research interests include the Hellenistic world, especially Egypt, Arabia and Bactria, cultural interactions/hybridity, border states, and numismatics. She is currently working on research related to the numismatic traditions of south Arabia and other areas beyond the Mediterranean and those lands' connections with the Hellenistic and Roman worlds.

 
Kelly Nguyen
Status: First Year
Kelly received her B.A. from Stanford University in 2012 with a double major in Classics (Honors) and Archaeology. Her honors thesis assessed the influence of the Roman imperial cult on social mobility in Asia Minor during the 1st-3rd CE. Her past fieldwork experience has taken her to Turkey (Çatalhöyük), Jordan (ancient Gerasa), England (Binchester), and Sicily (Salemi). Kelly has also spent a semester at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (Fall 2010). After graduation, Kelly expanded her study of marginalized populations to modern times and worked as a litigation assistant at the Prison Law Office (PLO). This seemingly unconventional experience at the PLO has enriched Kelly's interdisciplinary approach, inspiring her to look to other fields (such as sociology, anthropology, art history, and comparative literature) as she examines marginalized groups within the Roman Empire. Kelly’s main research interests include Roman social history, the archaeology of the Roman provinces, cultural hybridity, ancient colonialism and imperialism, the relationship between texts and material culture, and heritage issues.

 
Jessica Nowlin
Status: ABD
Jessica received her B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin in 2007 with a double major in Classics and Archaeology and a minor in Anthropology. She has done fieldwork in Belize, Ukraine, and southern Italy at Metaponto and Croton with the Institute of Classical Archaeology (University of Texas). She currently conducts fieldwork as a member of the topography team in the excavations of Gabii in northern Latium, Italy. Her research interests at the site focus on urban development during the Orientalizing period as well as how digital techniques of three-dimensional recording, especially close-range photogrammetry, can create an entirely new documentary record. She is now working on her dissertation, tentatively titled "Reorienting Orientalization: Local Consumption and Value Construction in Central Italy between the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic Sea". This work explores the ways in which local Italian populations actively incorporated eastern materials through inland trade networks that cross the central Apennines between the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic coasts. It focuses on investigating the entire funerary context instead of isolating 'exotica', entire cemeteries instead of solely elite tombs, and the interior Italian landscape rather than only the costal contact zone. Her broader research interests include culture contact and postcolonial theory, landscape archaeology, the application of GIS and remote sensing, theories of value and exchange, public archaeology and archaeological ethics.

 
Ian Randall
Status: ABD
Ian received his B.A. in Anthropology in 2005 and M.A. in the Social Sciences in 2009 from the University of Chicago. His M.A. thesis concentrated on the potential of Port St. Symeon Ware, a 13th century Levantine ceramic, to shed light on the changing social landscape of the late Crusader States. He has conducted fieldwork on the island of Gotland in Sweden (2004) at the Viking Age Settlement of Frojel as part of a University of Gotland project, at Abydos in Egypt (2006), working on the early 18th Dynasty temple of Queen Ahmose-Nefertary with a team from the University of Chicago, at Tell Hamoukar in Syria (2010), uncovering Akkadian and Ninevite V industrial levels in the lower town in a joint University of Toronto and University of Chicago excavation, in the Athenian Agora working on the Byzantine levels (2012), and most recently at Idalion and the Late Roman city of Kourion on Cyprus (2014). Ian has also worked in the private sector, conducting excavation and survey at Fatumafuti in American Samoa (2005), in central Illinois (2007), and in North Dakota (2011), where he worked with the Three Affiliated Tribes and the Sioux. His current research focuses on early medieval Cyprus, the transitions that occurred in material culture during the Arab-Byzantine Condominium and the Lusignan Dynasty, and the implications this may have for developing a more nuanced picture of the decision-making processes that shaped group identity. Ian's other interests include GIS, human osteology, postcolonial theory, and ceramic consumption.

 
Miriam Rothenberg
Status: First Year
Miriam received her B.A. from Oberlin College, having majored in Archaeological Studies and Anthropology, and minored in Geology (2012). She spent a year in England on a Fulbright scholarship, studying for an M.A. in Archaeology at Durham University (2014). Her M.A. dissertation used GIS to investigate settlement patterns and mobility in two rural areas in Italy (the Ager Veientanus and the middle Sangro Valley). Miriam has fieldwork experience in Colorado, New York, Alaska, northern England (Binchester/Vinovium), and central Italy (Sangro Valley Project). Her laboratory and technical experience includes managing Oberlin College’s geomorphology lab, doing GIS for the ‘Invisible Dead’ Project (Durham University), conserving cuneiform tablets at Cornell University, and running the paperless recording system and database for the Sangro Valley Project (2013). Her current research interests include mobility studies, archaeological GIS, geology and geoarchaeology, and historical linguistics.

 
Alexander Smith
Status: ABD
Alex graduated from Brandeis University in 2009 with a B.A. in both Classical Archaeology and Anthropology. He did his first fieldwork in Menorca, Spain from 2007-2009 and Rome, Italy in 2008. In 2010, Alex was introduced to regional jungle survey with the El Zotz Archaeological Project in Guatemala; and in 2011, he took part in the Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat (SLAM) project and the Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (BUPAP). Alex worked with the Boston University team in Menorca as a survey specialist from 2012-2014, in and around the site of Torre D'en Galmes and Isla del Rey. Since 2013, Alex has also worked at the Nuragic site of S'Urachi in West Central Sardinia, carrying out small scale survey operations around the site. Alex also has worked with the Memorial Art Gallery of Rochester, NY, since 2012, where he helps run an archaeological outreach program and assists in the creation of a series of iBooks for budding archaeologists. His main research interests include the archaeology of Spain, the Iron Age in the Western Mediterranean, theories of colonization and imperialism, and archaeological outreach, as well as comparative methodologies of archaeological survey. Some of Alex's other interests include geographic information systems, geophysics, and industrial archaeology.

 
Catherine Steidl
Status: Third Year
Catie graduated from Wesleyan University in 2011 with a B.A. in both Archaeology (Honors) and German Studies. Her honors thesis addressed the difficulties with various interpretations of the korai on the Athenian Acropolis, and the possible social implications of their dedication during the Greek Archaic period. After graduating from Wesleyan, Catie spent a summer working in the North American Archaeology Lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Following this, she spent a year at the University of Tübingen on the Connecticut—Baden-Württemberg Exchange Scholarship, where she studied Latin, Ancient Greek, and a variety of other archaeological topics. Her field work experience includes work with the UCLA Cotsen Institute in Pucará, Peru, and the Bucknell University project on the Ismenion Hill in Thebes, Greece. Her interests include the Greek Archaic period; the archaeology of women and social constructions of gender, particularly in Greece and Anatolia; and how cross-cultural interactions can be used to shed light on these aspects of daily life. She is also interested in domestic practice, pottery and vase painting, sculpture, and our modern interactions with ancient objects -- museums, museum theory, repatriation, and the associated ethical concerns.

 
Jennifer Thum
Status: Third Year
Jen received her B.A. in Archaeology from Barnard College/Columbia University (2009), with a thesis focusing on modern viewership of Graeco-Roman mummy portraiture from Egypt. She also holds an M.Phil. in Egyptology (2012) from the University of Oxford, where she was a Clarendon Scholar, with a dissertation on Late Period sacred animal "reliquaries". As an undergraduate, Jen interned with both the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Before beginning at Oxford, she spent a year split between the Registration Department at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, and the Pleiades Project at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World/NYU. Jen has excavated with the Megiddo Expedition at Tel Megiddo, Israel, since 2006, where she is a registrar. Her other field experience includes three seasons with the Jezreel Valley Regional Project, Israel; three seasons with the Amheida Project in the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt; and two seasons with the Athienou Archaeological Project in Athienou-Malloura, Cyprus. During the summer of 2014, she compiled a catalog of the small finds from the 1963-64 excavations at Achziv, Israel at the University of Haifa. Recently Jen has also been working with Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) at the Haffenreffer Museum and elsewhere. Her other interests include the relationship between text and image (especially with hieroglyphic scripts), depictions of the human physiognomy, and the Carian language as it relates to Egypt.

 
Clive Vella
Status: ABD
Clive received his B.A with Honors (2004) and M.A with distinction (2009) in Archaeology from the University of Malta. His graduate dissertation was the first research-driven study in the Maltese Islands to deal with lithic tools and their subsequent effects on prehistoric interpretations. In 2008-2009, he worked on grant-funded research at the Universita Degli Studi Di Roma "La Sapienza". Clive has numerous years of CRM and post-excavation experience in Malta and the US. He has also participated in research excavations in Southern Italy (Chiancudda in 2009 and Coppa Nevigata from 2007-2009 and 2013-2014), Gibraltar (2009) and Jordan (2011-2013). He is currently a staff researcher at the Tas-Silg excavation led by the Missione Archeologica Italiana a Malta. Clive is also involved in the Brock University Archaeological Project at Pantelleria (2012-2014) as Assistant Director, which is an undergraduate field school project focused on the arrival of the Phoenicians on Pantelleria during the Iron Age. He is also studying the extensive prehistoric lithic material recovered by the Brown University Petra Archaelogical Project in Jordan. His research interests are focused on the Late Neolithic to Late Bronze Age Central Mediterranean, especially offshore islands and their role with the Italian peninsula. He studies the effects of islands on their settlers, the act of voyaging, and expressions of inequality in later prehistory.