News

Lecture by Rachel Opitz Wednesday, January 28th at 6:00 pm

Rachel Opitz is at the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies at the University of Arkansas.  She is widely recognized for her deep skill set in geospatial analysis and visualization, a vital area currently lacking at the Joukowsky Institute, and has interacted with projects all over the world in her capacity as the Executive Director of the NSF-funded SPARC  (Spatial Archaeometry Research Collaborations) program.

(Distributed January 23, 2015)

Leslie named Leopold fellow

The Leopold Leadership Program has named Brown University environmental scientist Heather Leslie as one of its fellows for 2015. The program helps scientists build leadership and communication skills to better influence environmental policy and decision making.
 
(Distributed January 21, 2015)

Applications for the 2015-2016 Congressional Science Fellowship

AMS is accepting applications for the 2015-2016 Congressional Science Fellowship. The AMS Congressional Science Fellowship makes it possible for one scientist to spend a full year in the U.S. Congress working on science policy issues. (S)he will also be a member of the AAAS Science and Technology Fellows program, which includes over 30 Congressional fellows from other professional societies and more than 150 executive branch fellows.

(Distributed January 16, 2015)

Climate Change and Refugees - A new publication!

Two Brown undergrads, Kristine Mar and Katrina Lee, were students in Professor Dawn King’s ENVS-0110 class, Humans, Nature, and the Environment this past semester. They recently completed a research project on the interrelated issues of population displacement and environmental damage from climate change.

(Distributed December 11, 2014)

The Weather - Deadline: April 13, 2015

For an upcoming issue, Creative Nonfiction is seeking new essays about THE WEATHER. We're not just making idle chit-chat; the weather affects us all, and talking about the weather is a fundamental human experience. Now, as we confront our changing climate, talking about the weather may be more important than ever.

Send us your true stories—personal, historical, reported—about fog, drought, flooding, tornado-chasing, blizzards, hurricanes, hail the size of golfballs, or whatever's happening where you are. We're looking for well-crafted essays that will change the way we see the world around us.

(Distributed December 9, 2014)
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