News

Earth, Itself: Thinking the Earth - April 23rd & 24th


Thinking the Earth is a FREE event that combines keynote lectures, participatory panels, and contact improvisation dance performance, workshops and jams.

Through this unique approach, we will explore how people understand their environments and their place within them, consider the challenges of sustainable development, and encourage dialogue among senior level policy makers, academics and practitioners.

You may RSVP for whichever sessions you please. Follow the link below to register for this exciting event.

GO TO THINKING THE EARTH WEBSITE!

(Distributed January 30, 2015)

International Symposium on Brazil’s Model of Low Carbon Sustainable Development

On April 17th and 18th, Brown University is convening an international symposium to discuss Brazil’s approach to low carbon sustainable development with a focus on territorial planning and international negotiations in the face of climate change. This exciting symposium brings together cutting edge natural and social scientific research with discussions of current and future policy. Research presentations will cover regional climate change in Brazil; land use change and deforestation; and environmental, agricultural, and forest policy and governance. Discussion panels will provide a forum for scholars and policymakers to reflect on management of Brazilian territory for agriculture, forest, and other uses; and on Brazil’s role in international climate change negotiations. Participants come from government, universities, and NGOs across Brazil, and from universities in the US and Canada.

Visit the Symposium Website for more information and a schedule of events!

(Distributed April 9, 2015)

Graduate student Stephanie Spera to teach at Wheaton College next year

Pictured left to right: Ioana Jucan, Ashley Bowen-Murphy, Stephanie Spera and Wanda Henry. Photo: Susan ElyPictured left to right: Ioana Jucan, Ashley Bowen-Murphy, Stephanie Spera and Wanda Henry. Photo: Susan Ely

Stephanie Spera, a PhD student in the department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences, will spend a semester during the 2015-2016 academic year teaching a course at nearby Wheaton College through the Brown/Wheaton Faculty Fellowship program. This program aims to highlight the differences between academic careers based at liberal arts colleges and those based at research universities.

Spera feels that her interdisciplinary background as an IBES graduate student will be invaluable to her teaching experience at Wheaton. “The class I'm teaching on climatology is housed in the Physics department but pulls students from other disciplines," she explained. "This will allow me to use the skills I've gained by learning from and collaborating with sociologists, economists, and ecologists.”

To read the full story about Spera and the Brown/Wheaton Faculty Fellowship, visit the Graduate School website here.

(Distributed April 8, 2015)

US to release UN climate change plan; Roberts comments in ThinkProgress

Today, members of the United Nations face an informal deadline regarding their submission of Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs), detailed reports on their individual plans to both cut greenhouse gas emissions and limit average warming to 2 degrees Celsius or less. The United States is expected to release its plan by the end of the day.

Although some nations plan to release their INDCs closer to the Paris Summit in December, early submission by the U.S. demonstrates a strong committment to action, a committment that many in the U.N. feel has been lacking. As IBES fellow Timmons Roberts noted in ClimateProgress, a publication of ThinkProgress, “The U.S. is seen by the world as the country most needing to take on commitments on climate change, and until about two years ago, the least willing to do so.” In the article, Roberts also discusses the benefits of climate change alliances between the United States and developing nations such as China and Mexico.

Read the full article and all of Roberts' comments here.

(Distributed March 31, 2015)
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