Events

Events

AT BROWN

 

All events are held at the Annmary Brown Memorial (21 Brown Street) at 5:30 PM and free of charge unless otherwise indicated.

2014-2015 REMS SCHEDULE OF LECTURES

  • Monday, September 15, Barbara Fuchs (UCLA,)   “An Andalusian in Rome, or, Translating the Picaresque,” invited by the graduate students
  • Tuesday, Sept. 30: Jeremy Mumford (History), "Inka Sibling Marriage: Language, Kinship, Desire"
  • Tuesday, Oct. 28: Jay Reed (Classics), "Love's Imperium in Garcilaso de la Vega's Third Latin Ode"
  • Thursday, Feb. 26: Karen Newman (Comparative Literature), "Cervantes' La Gitanilla Translated and Hardy’s La Belle Egyptienne"
  • Tuesday, March 16: Neil Safier (John Carter Brown Library and History), "Translating Science at the Blind-Man’s Arch: Conceição Velloso and the Arco do Cego Printhouse"
  • Tuesday, April 28: Evelyn Lincoln (History of Art and Architecture), "The View from Here and There"

 CONFERENCE “Globalizing Chinese Medicine in the 17th Century: ‘Translation’ at Work” (October 17-18, 2014) 

Organized by Harold J. Cook, John F. Nickoll Professor of History

In the past decade, many projects have asked important questions about how forms of knowledge become globalized. While examples are often framed by the information economy, universal (sometimes Western) science, and commodity flows, other kinds of knowledge also traveled, such as “Chinese medicine.” Indeed, at the same time as the “rise of modern science,” Chinese medicine became a subject of interest to many people beyond China. Globalization was a process not dependent on “scientific” truth claims alone.

Among the other processes was that of translation, a word that hints at how meanings can be shifted even if they are never identical in different places.  It also suggests that agency lies with recipients as much as transmitters. Thus, many processes were at work in the globalization of Chinese medicine. Does noticing the emergence of Chinese medicine on the world stage help us better understand how some kinds of knowledge became “global”?

How Chinese medicine was being globalized in the 17th century is therefore a subject that raises many questions about the various kinds of people and processes involved in the mobility of knowledge on a world scale. But it is also a subject of importance in its own right. The participants in this international conference consider the subject of Chinese medicine and its relationships to other kinds of study, the forms it took in other places in the 17th century, and the processes that enabled these changes. 

Sponsored by Humanities Initiative, Brown University; Renaissance and Early Modern Studies; Department of HistoryFor further information, please contactMaria Sokolova (maria_sokolova@brown.edu), Administrator Renaissance and Early Modern Studies program

 

 2014-15 STS Lecture Series, Ebbs and Flows: the Culture and Control of Water in Past and Present:

Chandra Mukerji, The Power of Water and the State: Tapping Sources in the Mountains for the Canal du Midi
Monday, October 20, 4pm, in Barus and Holley, Room 190


Mukerji will discuss a historical case of infrastructural engineering in which water's power was tapped: the construction of the Canal du Midi in 17th-century France. Focusing on a document describing the problems and techniques entailed in building the canal's water supply, she will consider how the power of water was understood, and how earth and fire were used to turn water into a tool of state power. This analysis will reflect on contemporary debates on object agency in Science and Technology Studies by putting them in historical perspective.

Mukerji has a Ph.D. in Sociology and is a member of the Science Studies Program and Communication Department at UCSD. She has won prizes for her books, including the Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association for Impossible Engineering: Technology and Territoriality on the Canal du Midi. She is interested empirically in how changes in the built environment are furthered by science, and how materiality shapes social life. Conceptually, she is interested in distributed cognition, material memory, object agency, and post-humanist theories in science studies.

The talk will kick off a lecture series — Ebbs and Flows: The Culture and Control of Water in Past and Present — featuring four talks STS approaches to water. This event is sponsored by the Program in Science and Technology Studies and the C.M. Colver Lectureship.

MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN HISTORY SEMINAR (with department of History) Schedule

Tuesday, October 21, 5:30 pm – The 35th William F. Church Memorial Lecture (more coming soon)

 

JCB/BROWN BRITISH ATLANTIC SEMINAR (JBBAS)

 

OUTSIDE BROWN

This list announces talks in the greater Boston area pertaining to the study of the early modern period ca. 1450-1750, in any discipline and with any regional specialization. Please forward announcements, in the format requested at the end of this message, and e-mail addresses to: earlymod@fas.harvard.edu.

 

If you do not wish to be on this list, please reply to that effect. Many thanks to those who contributed to this effort.

 

*New listing

** Updated listing

***CANCELLED Cancelled listing

 

EARLYMOD THIS WEEK

 

Mondays, October through November, 2014 - 3:00pm-4:30pm

Sponsored by The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

Community Class, “Non-Dramatic Prose and Verse of the Sixteenth Century with Marie Roche”

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies, UMass – Amherst, 650 East Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01002

Free and open to the public. Pre-registration by October 3rd required. For pre-registration or more information contact: Ph. (413) 577-3600 577-3600 / renaissance@english.umass.edu

This is an 8-week survey class of the known and lesser-known works of the Sixteenth Century English Renaissance. No prior knowledge required. Weekly Readings provided. Every week will review different aspects of the English Renaissance literary corpus.

 

*Wednesday, November 12, 2014 – 5:00pm
Renaissance Colloquium

Lecture "Miltonic Mind"

Sanford Budick, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem

Kates Room, Warren House, Harvard University, 11 Prescott St., Cambridge, MA 02138

 

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 4:00pm

Sponsored by The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

Renaissance Wednesday Lecture Series, Rare Book Show and Tell

Lecturer, David Katz

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies, Reading Room, UMass – Amherst, 650 East Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01002

Free and open to the public. No reservations required.

For more information contact: Ph. (413) 577-3600 / renaissance@english.umass.edu

 

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 – 5:00pm
Sponsored by the Harvard Renaissance Colloquium
Lecture, "Miltonic Mind"
Sanford Budick, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Kates Room, Warren House, Harvard University, 11 Prescott St, Cambridge, MA 02138

Website: http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k40975&pageid=icb.page193179 

 

**Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 4:30pm

Sponsored by The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

Five College Renaissance Seminar

Russ Leo, Princeton University

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies, Reading Room, UMass – Amherst, 650 East Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01002

Free and open to the public. No reservations required. For more information contact: Ph. (413) 577-3600 / renaissance@english.umass.edu

 

Thursday, November 13, 2014 – 6:00pm

Talk, “A Criollo Cicero: Reassessing the Bibliotheca Mexicana Controversy”
Stuart M. McManus, Harvard University
DRCLAS Seminar Room, CGIS South 2nd floor, Harvard University, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

 

Thursday, November 13, 7:00pm

Sponsored by the Mahindra Humanitites Center

Seminar, "Female Literacy Revisited: Women Reading in London, 1570-1640",

Eleanor Hubbard, Princeton University

Room 133, Barker Center, Harvard University, 12 Quincy St., Cambridge, MA

http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/women-and-culture-early-modern-world

 

*Wednesday, November 14, 2014 - 4:00-6:00pm

Cultural Politics: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Talk -, "The Politics of Identity in the History of the Mozarabic Rite: From Medieval to Early Modern Iberia and Beyond"

Susan Leslie Boynton, Columbia University

Room K354, Knafel Building, Harvard University, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

http://wcfia.harvard.edu/event/cultural-politics-interdisciplinary-perspectives-11-14-2014

 

Friday, November 14, 5:30pm

Sponsored by the Mahindra Humanitites Center

Seminar, "The Making of Shakespeare: Commemoration, Cultural Memory, and 'the Bard'

Coppélia Kahn, Brown University

Room 133, Barker Center, Harvard University, 12 Quincy St., Cambridge, MA

http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/shakespearean-studies

 

Friday, November 14, 7:00pm-9:00pm

Co-sponsored by The Renaissance Center’s Reading Group and The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

Family Renaissance Games Night

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies, Reading Room, UMass – Amherst, 650 East Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01002

Join us for an evening of Renaissance-era board games, door prizes, refreshments, and more! Families and kids are welcome! Free and open to the public. No reservations required.

For more information contact: Ph. (413) 577-3600 / renaissance@english.umass.edu

 

Saturday, November 15, 2014 - 12:00pm - 5:00pm

Conference, "Muslims, Christians and Governance in the Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean"

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies,  650 East Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01002

Free and open to the public. Please register by November 14th, renaissance@english.umass.edu / Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

 

Monday, November 17, 2014 -  4:15pm

Sponsored by the Department of Music

Barwick Colloquia Series talk, “1,000,000 Years of Music: The Emergence of Human Modernity

Gary Tomlinson, Yale University

Davison RoomLoeb Music Library, 2nd floor, Music Building, North Yard, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Gary Tomlinson, is one of the foremost musicologists of Early Modern Europe, while his current research topic is all encompassing, it may be of interest for early modernists.
Free and open to the public
http://www.music.fas.harvard.edu/calendar.html

 

Monday, November 17, 2014 – 5:00pm

Co-sponsored by the workshop in Early Modern History, the Humanities Center Seminar in Book History and the Early Science Working Group. 

Talk, "From a Medical Republic of Letters to the Index of Prohibited Books,"

Hannah Marcus, Stanford University

Robinson Hall, Basement Seminar Room, Harvard University, 35 Quincy St., Cambridge, MA 02138

 

*Tuesday, November 18, 2014 - 4:30pm

Medieval and Early Modern History Seminar
Seminar, "A New Virgin Mary"

Tara Nummedal, Brown University

Pavilion Room, Brown University, Department of History, 79 Brown St., Providence, RI 02912

 

Wednesday, November 19, 4:00pm

Co-sponsored by The Renaissance Center’s Reading Group and The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

Classical Legacy Lecture, The Virtue Politics of the Italian Humanists

Lecturer, James Hankins

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies, Reading Room, UMass – Amherst, 650 East Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01002

Free and open to the public. No reservations required.

For more information contact: Ph. (413) 577-3600 / renaissance@english.umass.edu

 

UPCOMING EVENTS (* indicates a new listing / ** indicates an updated listing)

 

*Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 4:00-6:00pm

Graduate-Student Papers on Cultural Politics

Talk, "Translation Theory and Empire in Late Medieval England"

Taylor Cowdery, PhD candidate, Harvard University

Room S153, CGIS South, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

http://wcfia.harvard.edu/event/graduate-student-papers-cultural-politics

 

*Thursday, December 4, 2014 - 5:00 p.m.
Book Studies and the Department of History at Wellesley College

Lecture, "How Economic Ideas Travel: The Incredible Journey of Benjamin Franklin's "The Way to Wealth"

Kenneth E. Carpenter 

Library Lecture Room (1st floor), Clapp Library, Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481

Free and open to the public.  For more information, contact Simon Grote (sgrote@wellesley.edu)

 

Friday, December 5, 2014 - 5:30pm Reception / 6:00pm Seminar

Sponsored by the Shakespearean Studies Seminar, Mahindra Humanities Center, Harvard University

Graduate Symposium: “New Work on Early Modern Drama”

Speakers:

Emma Atwood, Boston College: “The Architecture of Soliloquy in Early Modern Drama”
Josephine Hardman, University of Massachusetts at Amherst:  “Tragicomic Transpositions: The Influence of Spanish Prose Romance on English Renaissance Tragicomedy”
Gregory Schnitzspahn, Tufts University: "‘What the Act Has Made You’: Approving Virginity in The Changeling
Room 133, Barker Center, Harvard University, 12 Quincy St Cambridge, MA 02138

See more at: http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/new-work-early-modern-drama#sthash.BqFij9v7.dpuf

 

Sunday, December 7, 2014 2:00pm-4:00pm

Co-sponsored by The Amherst Woman’s Club and The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

First Sunday Concert Series

Voces Feminae, directed by Catherine Bell

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies, Reading Room, UMass – Amherst, 650 East Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01002

Free and Open to the public. No reservations required. Donations welcome.

 

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