Courses for Spring 2020

  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    DiCarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Lennon
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Al-Ali
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Zengin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    VanValkenburgh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the residency requirement and are continuing research on a full time basis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Bioarchaeology and Forensic Anthropology

    Bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology have common methodological roots (human osteology) but are oriented to answer very different questions. Both are grounded in the anthropological sub-disciplines of biological anthropology and archaeology. The focus in bioarchaeology is advancing our understanding of the human experience in the past. Bioarchaeologists study a range of topics including health, violence, migration, and embodiment. Forensic anthropology is a form of applied anthropology that is employed to document and interpret human remains in medico-legal contexts. The course will survey both fields while instructing in the methodologies and approaches of each. The course complements The Human Skeleton (ANTH 1720).
    ANTH 1750 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cormier
  • Peoples and Cultures of Greater Mexico

    This course will focus on the cultural area known as Greater Mexico, incorporating Mexicans resident south of the Rio Grande, as well as the approximately 25 million Mexicans living permanently or for at a time in the United States. Specific topics to be covered in the class include: urban peasants and rural proletarians, recent challenges to gender conventions, national and international migration, nationalism and the changing meanings of the Conquest and colonial periods, land and indigenous rights, everday violence, machismo, popular culture, and protest and rebellion. Limited to first-year students.
    ANTH 0066N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Sound and Symbols: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

    This introduction to the study of language and culture considers how language not only reflects social reality but also creates it. We'll examine specific cases of broad current relevance, in the process learning how an analytical anthropological approach to language use lays bare its often hidden power. We'll consider how language creates and reinforces social inequality and difference, how language promotes and resists globalization, and how language is used creatively in performance, literature, film, advertising, and mass media. We will also consider how language does important social work in specific contexts, such as classrooms, courtrooms, medical settings, and political campaigns.
    ANTH 0800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Berman
  • Religion and Culture

    Global events in recent years seem to defy the commonsensical idea that religious traditions would decline or disappear in the modern epoch. We examine classic theories and methods in the study of religion to understand the continuing vitality of spiritual contemplation, asceticism, myths, rituals, magic, witchcraft, experiences of healing, and other ways of thinking and acting that are typically associated with (or against) the concept of religion.
    ANTH 1240 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Bioethics and Culture

    This course examines bioethics from an ethnographic point of view. Topics include pregnancy, death, suicide, disability, medical research, organ transplantation, and population control. We will distinguish between the moral experiences of people faced with difficult choices, and the ethical ideals to which they aspire. We will then ask: how can these perspectives be reconciled? When trying to reconcile these perspectives, how can we account for powerful dynamics of race, gender, class, religion, and cultural difference? Finally, how can we develop a code of ethics that takes these issues into account and also is fundamentally connected to everyday life?
    ANTH 1242 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • Anthropology of Homelessness

    Homelessness emerged as a public concern in the United States and in other industrialized countries in the late 1970s as people began encountering people living on the streets, a way of life formerly confined to the skid rows of large cities. In this course, through readings, readings, discussion, and hands on experiences with individuals and families experiencing homelessness, we will uncover the causes, conditions, and responses to homelessness. Each student will spend at least two hours per week in a local homeless-serving community partners in order to gain face to face experiences. The field placements will be facilitated by the professor.
    ANTH 1301 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • Archaeology of Death

    Examines death, burial, and memorials using comparative archaeological evidence from prehistory and historical periods. The course asks: What insight does burial give us about the human condition? How do human remains illuminate the lives of people in the past? What can mortuary artifacts tell us about personal identities and social relations? What do gravestones and monuments reveal about beliefs and emotions? Current cultural and legal challenges to the excavation and study of the dead are also considered.
    ANTH 1623 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
  • Principles of Cultural Anthropology

    A seminar exploring fundamental theoretical and ethnographic currents in 20th- and 21st-century cultural anthropology.
    ANTH 2010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • Methods of Anthropological Research

    A seminar on the methodological problems associated with field research in social and cultural anthropology. Designed to help students prepare for both summer and dissertation research.
    ANTH 2020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Besky
  • Ethnography

    Each week this class will study classic and contemporary ethnographies - as well as studies from sociology, journalism, and history - that achieve ethnographic results, but will require discussion to determine what they "are". We will carefully examine the methods involved in research for the books and how the ethnographies were written. Ethnographies will be chosen for their importance in anthropology and other fields, and will cover a broad range of topical and geographic contexts.
    ANTH 2050 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
  • Mesoamerican Archaeology and Ethnohistory

    Seminar focusing on current issues in the archaeology and history of Mesoamerica, including Mexico and Northern Central America. Draws on rich resources at Brown, including the John Carter Brown Library.
    ANTH 2520 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
  • Linguistic Theory and Practice

    An introduction to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of language and social life. We begin by examining semiotic approaches to language. We turn to classical research on language as a structured system - covering such topics as phonology and grammatical categories - but we focus on the implications of such work for broader social scientific and humanistic research. We then consider areas of active contemporary research, including cognition and linguistic relativity, meaning and semantics, pronouns and deixis, deference and register, speech acts and performativity, interaction, verbal art and poetics, reported speech, performance, and linguistic ideology.
    ANTH 2800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Berman
  • Senior Seminar: (Re)Making Anthropology

    This Senior Seminar capstone course is a critical look at the past, present, future of anthropology. The class proceeds from the premise that we must know the history of our field in order to build a stronger discipline. It examines the contributions and missteps of past anthropologists. Among the key questions to address: What are the discipline’s aims and contributions in the 21st century? Has the field successfully integrated diverse voices and perspectives? Are their central theories and methods that have (and continue to) define the field? What does it mean to be an anthropologist?
    ANTH 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
  • Material Matters

    In the past decade there has been a growing interest in the study of material culture as an explicitly interdisciplinary endeavor involving the fields of anthropology, archaeology, art history, literary theory, museum studies, and philosophy, among many others. These perspectives exhibit a range of approaches to interrogating how people make things, how things make people, how objects mediate social relationships, and how inanimate objects can be argued as having a form of agency. This graduate seminar is designed to encourage reflection upon material culture and its influence in shaping our lives.
    ANTH 2515 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • Transnational Feminist Politics and Knowledge Production

    This interdisciplinary graduate seminar aims to de-center and decolonize discussions about feminism(s) by focusing on transnational feminist politics and knowledge production. Course readings and discussions will engage theoretical and methodological tools associated with transnational feminist politics and decolonizing knowledge. At the same time, the course will provide concrete empirical examples of struggles, strategies and forms of feminist resistances emanating from the Middle East, Latin America, Africa and South Asia. The course will encourage students to ask questions about transnational feminist solidarities and knowledge productions as well as power imbalances, tensions and conflicts within and between feminist groups and initiatives.
    ANTH 2253 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Al-Ali
  • Reimagining Climate Change

    We know what causes climate change and we know what to do about it—yet it seems we only keep making it worse. Our climate stalemate suggests we need to look critically at the dominant responses to climate change so as to identify: why they have become commonsensical yet ineffectual or unrealizable; and why other responses remain silenced or unexplored. Such a lens impels us to reconsider silver-bullet “solutions” while creating space for views marginalized by exploitative, racist, patriarchal, and anthropocentric systems. Toward these ends, this course will prepare students to reconceptualize climate change and reimagine our responses to it.
    ANTH 1601 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lennon
  • The Just City: Installment I, Comparative Perspectives on Juvenile Justice Reform (URBN 1932)