Brown-ICERM-Kobe Simulation Summer School

Brown-ICERM-Kobe Simulation Summer School 

For the third consecutive year, the Division of Applied Mathematics welcomes students from Kobe University for an intensive research experienceFor the third consecutive year, the Division of Applied Mathematics welcomes students from Kobe University for an intensive research experienceGoals

This unique program has three important objectives. First, it provides graduate students with opportunities to acquire fundamental knowledge and skills in high performance computing, including parallel computing and visualization in 3D caves, and to expose them to the research carried out in these areas at Brown and Kobe Universities. Second, graduate students will  learn how to work collaboratively in teams, thus preparing them for the changing nature of research. Finally, the program will provide students with opportunities to develop a global perspctive and mindset through participation in a culturally rich and diverse program.  

Format

During the first week in Providence, students will attend mini-courses that provide an introduction to numerical algorithms, parallel computing, training on the FX-10 supercomputer in Kobe, and application areas. Simultaneously, student teams, led by advanced graduate students, postdocs, and faculty, will begin to work on their projects. During the second week in Kobe, the student teams will continue to work on their projects, run simulation on Kobe’s FX-10 (which has the same architecture as RIKEN’s K computer), and visualize results and data on Kobe’s 3D visualization system. Teams present their results on the last day to an audience of administrators and research faculty at Kobe University.

Distinctive Features

The program is distinguished by (i) the small number of participants and their teams, which allows for individual instruction, mentoring, and support, (ii) a two-week intensive research summer school which enhances multi-cultural competencies among students, and (iii) the participation of distinctive researchers from Brown, Kobe, and the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science as guest lecturers. will provide students with opportunities to develop a global perspective and mindset through participation in a culturally rich and diverse program.

Past Summer School Projects

A downloadable pdf  describing the projects is provided and are listed below:

Sessions

Providence Session August 17 - 21, 2015
Travel August 22 - 24, 2015
Excursion August 25, 2015
Kobe Session August 26 - 30, 2015
Kobe, Final Presentations

August 31, 2015

Schedule

Monday, August 17

8:30 a.m. 


9:00 a.m. 

Afternoon

 

Summer School begins 

Breakfast
Location- Room 110, 182 George Street 

Introductory talks by program leaders and short presentations by project participants
Location - Room 110, 182 George Street  

Introductory talks on HPC

Tuesday, August   18

9:00 a.m.

 

5:30 p.m.

Summer School continues in separate groups
Location - Digital Scholarship Laboratory in Rockefeller Library


Dinner - Flatbread Pizza Company
Location - 161 Cushing Street 

Wednesday, August 19

9:00 a.m.

Summer School continues in separate groups
Location - Digital Scholarship Laboratory in Rockefeller Library 

Thursday, August 20

9:00 a.m.

Summer School continues in separate groups
Location - Digital Scholarship Laboratory in Rockefeller Library 

Friday, August 21

9:00 a.m.

 

1:00 p.m.

Summer School continues in separate groups
Location - Digital Scholarship Laboratory in Rockefeller Library 


Short presentations by each group
Location - Digital Scholarship Laboratory in Rockefeller Library  

Saturday, August 22

 

TRAVEL

Monday, August 31

Final presentations for each group, location and time TBD

Prerequisites

This program is open to first- to second-year graduate students. Prior exposure to scientific computing and programming is useful but not required. 

History

The first two Brown-ICERM-Kobe Simulation Schools ran in August 2013 and 2014, each time with 3 research teams, consisting of one team leader and 4-5 team members. In 2014, the projects focused on the: 

  • Peridynamic Theory of Solid Mechanics
  • Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulation
  • Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Channel Flow

Registration

If you are interested in participating as  a regular participant (you should be a first- or second-year graduate student), or a project leader (advanced graduate student or postdoc), please email Bjorn Sandstede