Events

The Department hosts approximately 20 lectures annually, including a lecture series on a particular area of interest to the faculty each year. The annual Anita Glass Memorial Lecture is the Department's biggest lecture event. Smaller Roundtable discussions and informal lectures take place throughout the year. To be included on the mailing list for our events, please contact [email protected]

 

Events

  • You are cordially invited to Cécile Fromont’s (History of Art, Yale) talk on “Images on a Mission in Early Modern Kongo and Angola.”

    Early modern central Africa comes to life in the vivid full-page paintings of Italian Capuchin Franciscans, veterans of the Kongo and Angola missions composed between 1650 and 1750 for the training of future missionaries. Their “practical guides” present the intricacies of the natural, social, and religious environment of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century west-central Africa and outline the primarily visual catechization methods they devised for the region.
    Unfolding outside of a European colonial project, at the demand of local rulers, and among populations who had engaged with the visual and material culture of Europe and Christianity for more than one hundred and fifty years, the Capuchin central African apostolate is without parallel in the early modern world. Equally unique are the images that emerged in the friars’ sustained and fraught interactions with the men and women of Kongo and Angola.
    In this presentation, I analyze this overlooked visual corpus to demonstrate how such visual creations, though European in form and craftsmanship, did not emerge from a single perspective but rather were and should be read as the products of cross-cultural interaction. With this intervention, I aim to model a way to think anew about images created across cultures, bringing to the fore the formative role that encounter itself played in their conception, execution, and modes of operation.

    Humanities
  • Oct
    6

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today, artist Deborah Spears Moorehead will discuss her new work Perceptions of Organizational Change, through a Kaleidoscopic Lexicon of Color, a site-specific artistic response to the problematic wallpaper Les Vues d’Amerique du Nordin the main hallway of the Nightingale-Brown House.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • Oct
    13
    6:30pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Bob Dilworth

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today, Bob Dilworth, visual artist and Professor Emeritus, University of Rhode Island, will discuss his ongoing attempts to locate and interpret matters of blackness in his artwork during a time of social and political change.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • Romy Golan is Professor of 20th century art at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She is the author of Modernity and Nostalgia: Art and Politics in France Between the Wars; Muralnomad: The Paradox of Wall Painting, Europe 1927-1957 (Yale University Press, 1995 and 2009); and Flashback, Eclipse. The Political Imaginary of Italian Art in the 1960s (Zone Books 2021).

    Among her recent publications are “Umbertino Umbertino: The Many Masks of Rome’s Palazzo delle Esposizioni,” in Curating Fascism, “Renato Guttuso’s Boogie Woogie in Rome,1953: A Geopolitical Tableau,” in Art History; “Is Fascist Realism a Magic Realism?” in RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics and “Realism as International Style” (co-authored with Nikolas Drosos) in Postwar: Art between the Pacific and the Atlantic, 1945-1965, at Haus der Kunst in Munich.

  • Oct
    20
    6:30pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Nirva LaFortune

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today: Nirva LaFortune, Providence City Councilwoman and candidate for Mayor of Providence will discuss her time in City Council and what it means to be from Providence and be an elected official.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • Oct
    27
    6:30pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Renee Ater

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today: Renee Ater, former Professor of Art History and Archaeology at the University of Maryland and current Provost Visiting Associate Professor in Africana Studies at Brown University, will speak about her work at the intersection of race, monument building, and public space.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • Nov
    3
    6:30pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Kent Kleinman

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today: Kent Kleinman, Faculty Director of the Brown Arts Institute, will talk about the mission of the Brown Arts Institute as an incubator for interdisciplinary coursework, creative practices, and research in the arts.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • Nov
    10
    6:30pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: H. Jack Martin

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today: H. Jack Martin, Executive Director of the Providence Public Library, has been working in public libraries since the age of thirteen when his mom volunteered him to work at the Cornelia Public Library in Georgia. He will discuss how Providence Public Library has transformed itself into a 21st century, free, open-source learning university for the public.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • “The Chinese Discovery of America? Franciscan Missionaries and Mexican Material Culture in Guangzhou, 1579.”

    In 1579, a group of Franciscan friars under the leadership of one Fray Pedro Alfaro attempted to establish a mission in China. Taken into custody by the Ming authorities, their destiny was shaped by the work of both human and non-human mediators, specifically a Chinese interpreter and a series of objects that the friars had brought with them from New Spain. As far as we know, this incident represents the first encounter between Chinese literati and the material culture of colonial Spanish America. The encounter provides an opportunity to reflect on patterns of early modern globalization facilitated by trans-Pacific travel.

    Ricardo Padrón is a Professor of Spanish at the University of Virginia. Professor Padrón is a noted specialist in the literature and culture of the early modern Hispanic world who has published extensively on questions of empire, literature, cartography, and the geopolitical imagination.

    Brown University abides by public health guidance and health and safety protocols to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event, including current University policy regarding face masks and coverings (see the University’s COVID-19 Campus Activity Status page for the current policy for both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals).

    Humanities
  • Nov
    17
    6:30pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Andrew Raftery

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today: Andrew Raftery is an artist and Professor of Printmaking at Rhode Island School of Design. His recent work explores French scenic wallpaper and Chinese wallpaper displayed in museums and domestic interiors. He will present a portfolio of drawings and watercolors.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • Dec
    1

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today: Historian and filmmaker Claire Andrade-Watkins, Ph.D., a second-generation Cape Verdean American, chronicles the legacy and ‘lived’ memory of the Fox Point community where she was born and raised. She will be in conversation with a little girl who asked her neighbor, “Why do you still have your house, and we don’t?” Dr. Andrade-Watkins is Professor of Media and Africana Studies, MILAIS, Emerson College, and Visiting Scholar, Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice, Brown University.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • Dec
    8
    6:30pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Dietrich Neumann

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the Center for Public Humanities to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6:30 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting.

    Today: Dietrich Neumann, Director of the JNBC, will speak about the past and future of Public Humanities and the transformative power of public art.

    The Conversations Series is co-sponsored by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureships Fund.

  • Feb
    3
    5:30pm

    Lindsay Caplan Book Launch

    Rhode Island Hall
    In postwar Italy, a group of visionary artists used emergent computer technologies as both tools of artistic production and a means to reconceptualize the dynamic interrelation between individual freedom and collectivity. Arte Programmata traces the multifaceted practices of these groundbreaking artists and their conviction that technology could provide the conditions for a liberated social life. Forthcoming with the University of Minnesota Press on October 25th, 2022.