Events

The Department hosts approximately 20 lectures annually, including a lecture series on a particular area of interest to the faculty each year. The annual Anita Glass Memorial Lecture is the Department's biggest lecture event. Smaller Roundtable discussions and informal lectures take place throughout the year. To be included on the mailing list for our events, please contact the department coordinator.

 

Events

  • CYA offers study abroad programs in Athens, Greece. Take your learning outside of the classroom and into the landscape of Athens and Greece. Programs are available for semester, academic year, summer, winter, and virtual internships. Disciplines include Anthropology, Economics, Classics, Political Science, History, Psychology, Environmental Studies, and more! This information session will be hosted by CYA’s Campus and Student Relations Coordinator, Cheyenne Paulson.

    Advising, Mentorship, International, Global Engagement
  • Sep
    23
    6:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Bob Azar

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the John Nicholas Brown Center to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. Space is limited, please rsvp at: https://bit.ly/JNBC_Conversations_Fall21

    On September 23, Bob Azar, Deputy Director, Providence Department of Planning and Development and Professor of the Practice of Urban Studies at Brown University will present challenges and ideas for our city’s urban future.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

  • Join us for a shaky and not-undangerous hot air balloon ride where we’ll confect and drop and debate the ramifications of dropping various volatile arts projects onto the fortifications of the contemporary Empire, below. Afterwards over virtual tea we’ll discuss the ethical and political imperatives of creating and curating and making magic in ruined times.

    Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, PhD is Curator of Asian Pacific American Studies at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, where he oversees the Smithsonian Literature + Museum Initiative, devoted to rethinking collective responsibility for what we write and read, and why. Lead organizer for the Asian American Literature Festival, co-hosted by the Smithsonian, Library of Congress, and Poetry Foundation, he is also a co-founder of the pop-up Center for Refugee Poetics and founding Director of the arts antiprofit The Asian American Literary Review. He is currently ranked as the 9th best ice cream maker in human history.

  • Neebinnaukzhik Southall (Chippewas of Rama First Nation) will share their process of researching and understanding Anishinaabe material and non-material culture. From logos to watercolors, Neebin utilizes culturally-based visual language to promote visual sovereignty and an appreciation for Anishinabe culture.

    About the Speaker:
    Neebinnaukzhik Southall, a member of the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, is a graphic designer, artist, photographer, and writer based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where they run their small creative business Neebin Studios (www.neebin.com). They also maintain a list of Indigenous graphic designers at the Native Graphic Design Project (www.neebin.com/nativedesign). Neebin is fundamentally concerned with representing Native peoples in a positive and empowering way through their work.

    Supported by generous donors to the Barbara A. and Edward G. Hail Lecture Endowment.

    Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, Social Sciences
  • Oct
    5
    5:30pm - 7:00pm

    Color Coded: in neuroscience and culture

    Pembroke Hall

    Bevil R. Conway, Senior Investigator with the National Eye Institute at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), visits the Pembroke Center to present the lecture “Color Coded: in neuroscience and culture.” In the lecture, associated with the 2021-22 Pembroke Seminar “Color,” Conway examines the dogma that color vision plays a modest role in encoding and recognizing objects, and uses arguments from neuroscience, culture, and personal history to argue that color plays a fundamental role in perception and cognition.

    Sponsored by the Marshall Woods Lectureships Foundation of Fine Arts.

  • Photo by Erin Smithers
    Oct
    7
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    The Historical Fantasy of Esek Hopkins

    Nightingale-Brown House

    How can our process be care-centered? How do we reckon with the past and reimagine the future? “The Historical Fantasy of Esek Hopkins” is The Haus of Glitter’s original activist dance opera – the culmination of our 2 years living in the former home of Esek Hopkins, commander of the slaveship “Sally” (hired by the Brown brothers). Learn more about how The Haus of Glitter is working to disrupt the archives, activate public space and rethink how we memorialize. To read more: www.hausofglitter.org

    MATTHEW ROLANDO GARZA (he + they) is a Queer Tejanx/Latinx performance artist, Contemporary Afro-Latin choreographer, healer & educator. Recently named the Inaugural Artist in Residence for the Providence Arts + Culture + Tourism Department and Parks Department for the Historic Esek Hopkins Homestead & Park, Garza was also awarded the 2019 RI State Council for the Arts Fellowship in Choreography for their work as Creative Director for the TAPA Dance Company & Dean of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion at TAPA: Trinity Academy for the Performing Arts in downtown Providence. A founding member of the Glitter Goddess Collective & Haus of Glitter Dance Company, he is also a Senior Company Member of New Works/World Traditions Dance Company; an Art21 Educator; an Instructional Coach & Curriculum Designer for Project Wayfinder; an adjunct professor in the Theatre Department for CCRI’s program in the Men and Women’s prisons; a Community Organizer & Resident Artist for PRONK: Providence Honk Fest; and an Anatomy & Yoga/Asana Instructor for Yoga Alliance Teacher Certification Trainings, with an emphasis on inclusivity, transformative justice, & community healing. Garza holds a B.A. in Education History from Brown University ’11 and a dual M.A. in Educational Theatre & Social Studies Education from NYU. In their free time, Garza enjoys glitter, painting, singing, practicing/teaching yoga, dismantling institutional oppression, eating spaghetti, and making masks/costumes.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

  • Oct
    7
    6:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Marthe Rowen

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the John Nicholas Brown Center to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. Space is limited, please rsvp at: https://bit.ly/JNBC_Conversations_Fall21

    Today, Marthe Rowen, architect, educator and artist, will present some of her recent travel drawings at the intersection of time and space, and in particular her unique panorama drawings on a transcontinental Amtrak journey.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

  • Oct
    12
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Cultural Democracy as an Act of Collective Imagination

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Talk description coming soon.

    Speaker: JORDAN SEABERRY, Co-Director of Power and Possibility at the US Department of Arts and Culture.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

  • Oct
    15
    5:30pm

    Chika Okeke-Agulu, African and African Diaspora Art

    Live Stream & List Art Building

    This year’s annual Anita Glass Lecture will be delivered by poet, curator, blogger, and art historian Chika Okeke-Agulu who will discuss the work of Ghanian-born artist El Anatsui, one of Africa’s most celebrated contemporary sculptors.

    In March 2019 Princeton University Professor Okeke-Agulu co-curated El Anatsui: Triumphant Scale at the Haus der Kunst Museum in Munich - perhaps the largest solo show of a black African artist in Europe. Okeke-Agulu’s talk, El Anatsui’s Metamorphic Objects, will discuss the show, while also examining the ontological and epistemic orders that inform our understanding of El Anatsui’s shape-shifting, monumental metal sculptures. This event is currently open to Brown faculty, staff, and students. More details will be forthcoming.

    Professor Okeke-Agulu is Professor of African and African Diaspora Art at Princeton University. His recent books include Postcolonial Modernism: Art and Decolonization in 20th-Century Nigeria (2015), Obiora Udechukwu: Line. Image. Text (2018), and Yusuf Grillo: Painting. Lagos. Life (2020).

    Arts, Performance, HIAA Annual Lecture Series, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the John Nicholas Brown Center to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. Space is limited, please rsvp at: https://bit.ly/JNBC_Conversations_Fall21

    Today, Ultramoderne’s principals Yasmin Vobis (Assistant Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design) and Aaron Forrest (Associate Professor in Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design) will talk about some of their work and their interest in ‘Vacant Providence.’

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

  • Stephanie Pilat, Director of the Division of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma will present a talk entitled, The Afterlife of Fascist Architecture and Urbanism.

    The Fascist regime left a physical legacy in nearly every Italian village, town, and city. From entirely new towns, roads, and infrastructure to stadiums, summer camps, schools, housing, and monuments, the regime sponsored a vast array of building projects. These lingering reminders of fascism provoke the question: who should now decide the fate of these buildings, towns, and monuments scattered across the country and in Italy’s former colonies? Who gets a say in the afterlife of fascism? What do the decisions made about what to preserve, adapt or demolish tell us about Italian society and nationalism today? An analysis of two sites in Rome will illustrate some of the ways in which the physical legacy of Fascism is being negotiated today.

  • Nov
    4
    6:00pm

    Conversations at the JNBC: Becci Davis

    Nightingale-Brown House

    This weekly series brings together local artists, architects, writers, thinkers, musicians at the John Nicholas Brown Center to discuss their work with the public, every Thursday at 6 pm. A short presentation will be followed by Q&A and a convivial gathering in a fairly intimate setting. Space is limited, please rsvp at: https://bit.ly/JNBC_Conversations_Fall21

    Today, Becci Davis, an Artist, Adjunct Lecturer at Brown University, and 2021 Guest Lecturer at Mount Holyoke College will talk about her recent projects that use water as a medium to explore collective memory through interactive installation, performance, and multisensory experiences. 

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

  • Nov
    16
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Curatorial Accountability

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Talk description coming soon.

    Speaker: ROB BLACKSON, Co-Director of Curatorial Programs and Curator of Citywide Initiatives, Philadelphia Contemporary.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.

  • Dec
    2
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Black Out: Remixing Racist Wallpaper

    Nightingale-Brown House

    Talk description coming soon.

    Speaker: JAZZMEN-LEE JOHNSON, Artist.

    *All individuals – regardless of vaccination status – must wear masks indoors, unless in a private, non-shared space or when actively eating. In addition, social distancing of at least six feet must be maintained when unmasked. Unvaccinated individuals must continue to wear a mask outdoors when social distancing of at least six feet is not possible. Event attendees, including visitors and guests, must comply with all COVID-19 University policies and protocols in place at the time of the event.