Courses for Spring 2016

EGYT

  • In the Beginning: Cosmos and Creation in the Ancient World

    As in every human society, the people of ancient Mesopotamia (Iraq) and Egypt wondered about the universe, their world, and how it came about in the first place. Preserved for us in ancient texts and images, their ideas share some things in common with more familiar ancient traditions, such as the creation account in the Bible. In this course, you will look at these ancient texts and images and learn how to dissect them to find what their authors were thinking. In the process, you will discover some surprisingly sophisticated concepts that are still present in our own culture. DPLL FYS
    EGYT 0300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rutz
  • Introduction to Classical Hieroglyphic Egyptian Writing and Language (Middle Egyptian II)

    Continuation of a two-semester sequence spent learning the signs, vocabulary, and grammar of one of the oldest languages known. By the end of this introductory year, students read authentic texts of biographical, historical, and literary significance. The cornerstone course in the Department of Egyptology - essential for any serious work in this field and particularly recommended for students in archaeology, history, classics, and religious studies. Prerequisite: EGYT 1310.
    EGYT 1320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Depuydt
  • History of Egypt II

    A survey of the history and society of ancient Egypt from the Ramesside Period to the Roman conquest (ca. 1300-30 BC). Readings include translations from the original documents that serve as primary sources for the reconstruction of ancient Egyptian history.
    EGYT 1440 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Depuydt
  • Senior Seminar

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    EGYT 1920 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 1920 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Depuydt
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 1920 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Rutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 1920 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Bestock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 1920 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Steele
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Amarna Seminar

    In this course, students will examine the political and cultural questions involved in the Amarna Period of Ancient Egypt. Students will be required to research available primary evidence as well as the various theories, often conflicting, that scholars have drawn from the evidence; to discuss their findings in class; and to draw their own conclusions about existing theories, or to propose new ones.
    EGYT 2520 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
  • The Perception of Time and Space in Ancient Egypt

    This seminar aims to explore how ancient Egyptian perceived time and space, how they described them, and how they experienced them. Topics covered will include, inter alia, the notion of eternity, the mechanisms of time counting and space organization, the issue of awareness of history, the question of gender-differentiation in the domestic sphere, and the creation of a place.
    EGYT 2530 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Salmas
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    EGYT 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    EGYT 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Depuydt
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    EGYT 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Bestock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    EGYT 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep

ASYR

  • Intermediate Akkadian

    This course is the second semester of an intensive, yearlong introduction to the Akkadian (Babylonian/Assyrian) language. Students will deepen their knowledge of the cuneiform writing system and continue to develop their grasp of Akkadian grammar. Readings from Mesopotamian texts in the original language and script will include, among others, selections from the Laws of Hammurapi, Assyrian historical texts (such as the accounts of Sennacherib's siege of Jerusalem), and the story of the Flood from the Standard Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh. Prerequisite: Introduction to Akkadian (ASYR 0200 or ASYR 1000) or permission of the instructor.
    ASYR 1010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Wainer
  • Scientific Thought in Ancient Iraq

    This course will investigate a variety of ancient scientific disciplines using primary sources from ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq). By reading the original texts and studying the secondary literature we will explore the notion of scientific thought in the ancient world and critique our own modern interpretation of what “science” is and how different traditions have practiced scientific methods towards a variety of aims. Looking at a range of disciplines will allow us to compare and contrast the different ways in which scientific thinking is transmitted in the historical record. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ASYR 1725 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Monroe
  • Collecting Knowledge in the Ancient World: Assurbanipal's Library in Context

    Nineveh (now in present-day Mosul, Iraq) was the Assyrian empire’s last capital and home to one of the earliest large-scale collections of ancient literature: Assurbanipal’s library. Remembered in Greek tradition as Sardanapalus, this 7th-century king is credited with amassing thousands of clay tablets and wooden writing boards in a state-sponsored institution that included myths, hymns, rituals, medical and divinatory lore, and ancient dictionaries. This course will explore the contents and significance of Assurbanipal’s library, looking in a comparative way at its antecedents and heirs across the ancient world. Additional topics include: colophons; royal literacy; court scribes; libraries, museums, and heritage. DPLL
    ASYR 1850 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rutz
  • Ancient Scientific Texts: Akkadian

    Readings and analysis of a major scientific text in Akkadian. Prerequisite: AWAS 0200 or 0210. Open to graduate students only.
    ASYR 2310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Steele
  • Scribal and Scholarly Practices in Babylonia and Assyria

    This seminar will explore the development of written traditions among the cuneiform scribes of ancient Babylonia and Assyria. Topics covered include the mechanics of writing on clay tablets, the training of scribes and the school curriculum, the status of scribes in society, the development of literary and scholarly traditions, the creation of tablet archives, the circulation of scholarly knowledge, and the range of scholarship (e.g. science, medicine, ritual, literature) found in Babylonia and Assyria.
    ASYR 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Steele
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ASYR 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep