Courses for Fall 2017

  • History of Capitalism

    Capitalism didn't just spring from the brain of Adam Smith. Its logic is not encoded on human DNA, and its practices are not the inevitable outcome of supply and demand. So how did capitalism become the dominant economic system of the modern world? History can provide an answer by exploring the interaction of culture and politics, technology and enterprise, and opportunity and exploitation from the era of the Atlantic Slave Trade to the 2008 Financial Crisis. HIST 0150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation, and argument. This class presumes no economics background, nor previous history courses.
    HIST 0150A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • Foods and Drugs in History

    What we consume connects us to the worlds of both nature and culture. Bodily and socially, “you are what you eat,” but if your well-being suffers, you often seek out other ingestible substances. In many times and places, changing what you eat is thought to be healing, while in other times and places drugs – either remedial or recreational – are thought to be distinct and more immediately restorative. Few human interactions with the larger world are more important or interesting than how comestibles and medicines have been discovered, mixed, transformed, distributed, and how those processes have changed us. WRIT
    HIST 0150H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • Colonial Latin America

    Colonial Latin America, from Columbus's voyage in 1492 to Independence in the nineteenth century, was the creation of three peoples: Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans. Spanish and Portuguese conquerors brought with them the world of the Crusades, the Inquisition, and the Renaissance. Native Americans lived there already, in rich empires and hunter-gatherer bands. Africans came as slaves from Senegal, Nigeria, Congo and Angola, bringing old traditions and creating new ones. These diverse peoples blended together to form a new people. This was a place of violence, slavery and oppression -- but also of art, faith, new societies, new ideas. P WRIT
    HIST 0233 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to the Present

    This course is an introduction to the history of the modern Middle East from the mid-19th C to the present. Readings and topics are structured chronologically, and emphasize the key events and turning points in the political and economic history of the region. The goal of the course is to understand how the Middle East, as it is today, has been shaped by the events of the past.
    HIST 0244 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mitter
  • From Fire Wielders to Empire Builders: Human Impact on the Global Environment before 1492

    This is a new lecture course intended to introduce the field of environmental history to students with no previous experience in it. The study of prehistoric, ancient and medieval environments is a heavily interdisciplinary research field, and the course will emphasize the variety of sources available for studying it. We will combine textbook readings with primary source readings from scientific and archaeological reports and, especially, contemporary texts. P
    HIST 0270A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lander
  • The Enlightenment

    The Enlightenment: Introduction to the Enlightenment as a fragmented series of projects that aimed at human liberation and the understanding of the social and natural worlds, with massive implications for the way that we conceive of ourselves today. Readings explore philosophy, science, slavery, economics, gender relations, and politics in the 18th century. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0522O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Revill
  • State Surveillance in History

    How and why do states watch their citizens? This course explores historical practices of state surveillance from the perspective of both the “watchers” and the “watched.” Special emphasis will be given to twentieth-century Europe, but examples from other parts of the world and the US will also be featured in the readings. Some of the readings will be primary sources: memoirs, diaries, surveillance files. Other sources will include films and short fiction and some scholarly pieces on the workings of state security and secret police organizations. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0523B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Case
  • Robber Barons

    Today, the United States looks a lot like it did at the turn of the 20th century. Much like it is now, America's economy at that time saw tremendous growth interrupted by periodic financial crises. Moreover, both are periods of immense inequality. Whereas we have the one per cent, the late 19th century witnessed a small group of capitalists amass unprecedented fortunes, which provided immense political power. In this class, we will explore what the lives of these “robber barons” can tell us about the role of economic privilege in shaping America’s social, cultural, and political history. FYS WRIT DPLL
    HIST 0555B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • Sport in American History

    This course covers the relationship of sports to aspects of American culture since 1900. Topics include gender, race, amateurism, professionalism, intercollegiate athletics, and sports heroes. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0556A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • Narratives of Slavery

    This course will uncover the history of the slave trade, the labor regimes of slavery in the Caribbean and North America, and the rise of the Cotton Kingdom through the voices of the very people who lived through it: enslaved people themselves. We will read slave narratives, court documents, abolitionist treaties, oral histories of formerly enslaved people, and fictional accounts produced in the period. We will give special attention the ways that different kinds of historical sources-different types of narratives-shape what we know and how we know it in the history of slavery. FYS WRIT DPLL
    HIST 0557C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
  • The Age of Revolutions, 1760-1824

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, the Americas belonged to a handful of European monarchies; within a few decades, most of the Americas was composed of independent republics, some of the European monarchs were either deposed or quaking on their thrones. Usually considered separately, revolutions in British North America, France, Saint-Domingue (Haiti) and Spanish America had diverse local circumstances yet composed a single cycle of intellectual ferment, imperial reform, accelerating violence and, forging of new political communities. We will examine revolutions that helped create the world we live in. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT P
    HIST 0580M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • History of Jews in Brazil

    This sophomore seminar studies the history of Jews in Brazil from early colonial rule to the present. We first focus on the role of Jews and New Christians in the economic development of the Portuguese colony. We then examine the presence of the Inquisition, North African immigration in the nineteenth century, the larger Eastern European immigration in the twentieth century, and the formation of communities and institutions over the course of the last hundred years. Finally, we consider the role of Jewish opposition to the military regime and in the consolidation of democracy in the late twentieth century. DPLL
    HIST 0637A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • Welfare States and a History of Modern Life

    History of the American welfare state, from its origins in nineteenth-century industrial capitalism to contemporary debates about health care, in comparative perspective. Why did welfare states appear and what form did the U.S. version take? Considerations of social inequality, labor relations, race, gender, family policy, the social wage, and the relationship between markets and the state are all considered. Some comparison with European models. SOPH WRIT
    HIST 0654A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • Brown v. Board of Education (EDUC 0610)

  • Israel's Wars (JUDS 0050H)

  • Outside the Mainstream: A History of Minorities in Japan

    When Japan ratified the United Nations’ International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, its representative reported, “The right of any person to enjoy his own culture…practice his religion or to use his own language is ensured under Japanese law. Minorities … do not exist in Japan.” NOT! Many minority communities are present in Japan today. This course examines how several came into existence in the modern era, struggled to maintain distinctive lifestyles in a society that often defines itself as one of the world’s most homogenous, and influenced the flow of Japanese history.
    HIST 1145 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • Imperial Japan

    This course is for students interested in exploring the changing ideas, technologies and practices that shaped Japan’s history from the 1850s, when it confronted the power of an encroaching West, to the 1930s when its choices led the nation to the edge of ruin. Lectures and readings will address the collapse of the Tokugawa regime, the Meiji Restoration, the construction of empire, and the emergence of new forms of cultural and political expression. Students will also learn how ideas about gender, race, and tradition were understood and made use of in Imperial Japan. Open to all students. WRIT
    HIST 1149 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • History of Greece: From Alexander the Great to the Roman Conquest

    In 334 BCE, the 22-year-old Alexander crossed over to Asia and North Africa perhaps already in his own mind to conquer the known world, thus changing the history of the West forever. The values of a small, if intensely introspective, people (the Greeks) became the cultural veneer for much of West, as the period became known as the Hellenistic (“Greekish”) Age. It led to the spread of a monotheistic idea, a profound belief in individualism, alienation from central power, and yet, conversely, the creation of natural law and human rights, along with a deep desire for universalism. P WRIT
    HIST 1200C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Modern European Intellectual and Cultural History: The Fin de Siecle, 1880-1914

    A sequel to HIST 1230A focusing on radical intellectual and cultural currents that challenged and destabilized the assumptions of Victorian high culture during the fin de siecle. Through a careful reading of primary texts by Hobhouse, Nietzsche, Weber, and Freud. The course explores issues such as the rise of mass consumer culture, neoliberal and neofascist politics, philosophic irrationalism, psychoanalysis, and the woman question. WRIT
    HIST 1230B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Making A "Second Sex": Women and Gender in Modern European History

    This course deals with the history of European women and gender from the Enlightenment to the present. It will focus on large historical themes and questions, especially shifting constructions of femininity and masculinity. It will begin with an analysis of eighteenth-century philosophies regarding women and gender, and it will move to examinations of specific topics such as industrialization, Victorian femininity, the suffrage movements, gender and the Great War, interwar sexuality, fascism, gender and the Second World War, and the sexual revolution.
    HIST 1235A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • Politics of Violence in 20C Europe

    Europe's 20th century saw the emergence of forms of violence unthinkable in a world without mass politics. To better understand the changes in European states and societies that gave rise to total war and the violence associated with totalizing ideologies such as fascism and communism, we will read Lenin, Mussolini, Hitler, Fanon and others who sought to interpret violence as an extension of ideology. We will also read selections from more recent works by state leaders, historians and cultural figures from Ukraine to France, from Turkey to Great Britain who have reinterpreted past violence for present political ends.
    HIST 1240A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Case
  • Truth on Trial: Justice in Italy, 1400-1800

    Why do we think that one human being can judge another? How did this activity, enshrined in legal and political systems, profoundly shape society? We'll examine the changing face of justice, from the medieval ordeal to judicial torture; expansion of inquisitorial and state law courts; and the eventual disillusionment with the use of torture and the death penalty in the eighteenth century. Using Italy as focus, the course explores how law courts defined social, political, scientific, and religious truth in Italy. Students may pursue a project on another geographical area for their final project for the course. WRIT P
    HIST 1262M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
  • English History, 1529-1660

    Examines politics, religion, and society from the Protestant Reformation to the Puritan Revolution-a period of rapid and dramatic change when the world, for most English people, was turned upside down. Considers the experiences and concerns of ordinary men and women, as well as the elite. Takes in Scotland, Ireland, and the great migration to New England. P WRIT
    HIST 1266C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • History of Brazil

    This course charts the history of Brazil from Portuguese contact with the indigenous population in 1500 to the present. It examines the countrys political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural development to understand the causes, interactions, and consequences of conflict, change, and continuity within Brazilian society. WRIT
    HIST 1310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • The Mexican Revolution

    To study the Mexican Revolution is to examine the sweeping history of Modern Mexico: from the Liberal reforms of Benito Juárez to the enduring power of the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI); from peasant revolutionary Emiliano Zapata to his namesake Zapatistas of Chiapas; from Pancho Villa’s mass revolutionary army to transnational mystic Teresita Urrea; from the landlord Francisco Madero who led the insurgency to Lázaro Cárdenas who enacted land and labor reforms; from the constant flows of migrants crossing the border back and forth to Mexico’s defiance against Trump’s wall.
    HIST 1333 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
  • Making America Modern

    This course surveys a crucial period in American history between the end of Reconstruction and the beginning of World War I. During this time, the United States transitioned from a relatively fragmented, traditional, and largely agricultural society into one that was remarkably diverse, increasingly urban, and highly industrialized. In surveying this important transitional period, we will pay particular attention to far-reaching changes in the nation's business and economic life, its social movements, as well as its cultural developments, all with an eye to understanding how the United States became one of the world's most commanding economic, political, and cultural powers. DPLL WRIT
    HIST 1505 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • American Urban History, 1870-1965

    A survey with a specialized focus exploring American history from an urban frame of reference. Topics include the social consequences of the modern city, politics, reform, and federal-city relations. WRIT
    HIST 1551 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • Empires in America to 1890

    In this class, we’ll consider some of the forms of empire-building by various groups of indigenous and colonizing peoples in what is now the United States in order to understand the development of imperial U.S. power in both domestic and international contexts. Rather than resting upon a foregone conclusion of European settler colonial “success,” the course explores the contingent and incomplete nature of empire-building even within unbalanced power relationships. DPLL WRIT
    HIST 1553 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Haley
  • The History of American Education (EDUC 1020)

  • Introduction to Yiddish Culture (JUDS 1713)

  • History of Greece from Archaic Times to the Death of Alexander (CLAS 1210)

  • Roman Religion (CLAS 1410)

  • Medicine and Public Health in Africa

    This course explores the major debates in the history of medicine in Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and highlights the coexistence of a variety of healing traditions and medical understandings across the continent. It will focus on the following questions: What are some of the ways Africans practice and understand medicine? How have these practices interacted with other medical systems? What impact did colonialism have on the production of medical knowledge? How were practices and treatments evaluated and deemed effective? By whom and on what grounds? And how have independent African states addressed these critical issues?
    HIST 1960Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Johnson
  • North Korea: Past, Present, Future

    Typically, the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK) is portrayed as a rogue nation ruled by the Kim family, autocrats who are either “mad” or “bad” and whose policies have traumatized the country’s citizens, wrecked the economy, and threatened nuclear disaster on South Korea, East Asia, even the USA. This course moves beyond such stereotypes to examine the interconnected political, economic, and cultural transformations of the DPRK from 1945 to the present. Also included are the lived experiences of the Korean people, the plight of refugees, and the question of unification with South Korea. WRIT
    HIST 1961I S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • The Social Lives of Dead Bodies in China and Beyond

    Corpses, much like the living, are not neutral bodies, but are managed into structures of social meaning. This course aims to uncover corpses as signifiers and actors during times of community upheaval. We will take modern China as our focal point, but also look elsewhere in the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia since the 19th century, when the broadening scale and nature of warfare; state expansion; rapid urban and rural development; global circulations of technology; and the interplay of international philanthropies with older forms of charity and ritual pacification significantly affected the treatment, conceptions, and actions of the dead. DPLL WRIT
    HIST 1962D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Age of Impostors: Fraud, Identification, and the Self in Early Modern Europe

    Alchemists claiming to possess the philosophers' stone; basilisks for sale in the market; Jews pretending to be Catholics; women dressing as men: early modern Europe appeared to be an age of impostors. Officials responded to this perceived threat by hiring experts and creating courts, licenses, passports, and other methods of surveillance in an era before reliable documentation, photography, DNA. And yet one person's fraud was another's self-fashioning. We will examine instances of dissimulation, self-fashioning, and purported fraud, efforts to identify and stem deception, and debates about what was at stake when people and things were not what they seemed. P WRIT
    HIST 1964A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
  • Early Modern Ireland

    This seminar will cover various themes in the political, religious, social and cultural history of Ireland between c. 1500 and the later eighteenth century. Topics to be discussed will include the Reformation, the Irish Rebellion, Cromwell's rule, the War of the Two Kings, popular protest, the beginnings of the Irish nationalism, and the experiences of women. P WRIT
    HIST 1964F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • 'Naturally Chic': Fashion, Gender, and National Identity in French History

    From its beginnings, the fashion industry in France has been synonymous with the international reputation of the nation. Similarly, being “chic,” having an innate sense of discernment and style, became synonymous with French femininity. This seminar will explore the interconnectivity of the history of fashion in France, the requirements it placed on French women, and the pressures the fashion industry has borne since the 1700s. We will look at how fashion reflected and created the moods of various periods, and we will also see how French women’s national belonging has been innately tied to ability to display French fashion. WRIT
    HIST 1965O S01
    Pre-Requisites: MUSC 0550-0560. Audition on the first day of class with Händel’s Messiah Overture. Students will play for their colleagues. Prior knowledge of orchestration and instrumentation is helpful. Knowledge of transposition and C clefs is helpful. If you have placed out of music theory at Brown or have questions, please contact the instructor at: brandon_brown@brown.edu
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • Colonial Encounters and the Creation of Latin America

    This seminar examines how interactions between Europeans and indigenous peoples shaped the formation of early Latin America. From Florida to Brazil, invasion led to widely varied outcomes, including outright failures. Students will come to see colonization as a difficult, uneven process, as Europeans struggled to comprehend and engage unfamiliar natural and human environments; the new societies that emerged reflected complex transatlantic exchanges. Our readings will consist of primary sources from the sixteenth century, supplemented by academic texts. Students will write a series of three-page response papers, along with a ten to twelve-page essay on major themes from the course. P
    HIST 1966Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Approaches to the Middle East

    This seminar introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Middle East Studies in the broader context of the history of area studies in the humanities and social sciences. Why and when did the Middle East become an area of study? What are the approaches and topics that have shaped the development of this field? And what are the political implications of contending visions for its future? The readings sample canonical and alternative works and the classes feature visits by leading scholars who research and write on this pivotal and amorphous region. WRIT
    HIST 1968A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • History of Capitalism: The Eastern Mediterranean and the World Around

    This course is an analysis of where the Mediterranean region fits in the evolving capitalist world-economy in the aftermath of the so-called Age of Discovery. The context of the Mediterranean is set in our own age’s “globalization” as histories of capitalism push on the “world” in new ways challenging our mental maps for historical change. The seminar takes on a critical approach to the European historiography on the rise of capitalism and the view that the Mediterranean collapsed with the rise of the Baltic and the Atlantic.
    HIST 1968F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Toksoz
  • Islam in Turkey: Rumi to the Republic

    1000 years ago, Constantinople was the splendor of Eastern Christendom. 500 years later it was the capital of history’s greatest Muslim empire. Today, it is Europe’s largest city and financial hub of a secular republic. Eschewing generic treatments of a monolithic, timeless “Islam” this course explores questions of Muslim faith and politics, empires and nationalism, as well as race, gender, and belonging in an undeniably pivotal country of Europe and Asia: Turkey. From the life and times of the world’s best-known sufi saint, to NATO’s second-largest military, this course historicizes the medieval beginnings and modern transformations within Turkish Islam.
    HIST 1968K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
  • Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples I

    This advanced undergraduate seminar seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the links between the region now known as Israel and Palestine and the peoples that have inhabited it or have made it into part of their mental, mythical. and religious landscape throughout history. The course will be interdisciplinary at its very core, engaging the perspectives of historians, geologists, geographers, sociologists, scholars of religion and the arts, politics and media. At the very heart of the seminar is the question: What makes for the bond between groups and place - real or imagined, tangible or ephemeral. No prerequisites required. WRIT
    HIST 1969A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • U.S. Human Rights in a Global Age

    Examines how the U.S. has shaped or been shaped by global human rights struggles. Topics include: indigenous rights in the U.S. Early Republic; Antislavery in the early Atlantic World; anti-imperialism in U.S. wars with Mexico and Spain; U.S. and human rights conventions; the Cold War and Civil Rights; and recent U.S. policies concerning human migration. No prerequisites. Priority given to seniors and juniors and those who have not taken the related course HIST 1972A (though students may take both courses). Instructor permission required (email professor before end of registration period).
    HIST 1972H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • Prostitutes, Mothers, + Midwives: Women in Pre-modern Europe and North America

    Today’s society often contrasts stay-at-home moms with working women. How did women in Europe and North America navigate the domestic and public sphere from the late medieval period to the start of the twentieth century? How did gender affect occupational identity? Were women excluded from the professional class? This seminar investigates gender in the workplace, looks at gender-specific employment, and considers how families functioned. Readings include passages from classical, religious, and medical texts as an introduction to medieval gender roles. Students will explore texts, images, and film to understand pre-modern work and the women who did it.
    HIST 1979H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
  • The Indian Ocean World

    Oceans cover two-thirds of the surface of the earth. They are the world’s great connectors. Rather than political boundaries of empire and nation-state, this course focuses on an enduring geography of water as the central shaper of history. Drawing together the history of three continents this course explores the Indian Ocean world as a major arena of political, economic and cultural contact during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. As we map the contours of this history we study how race, gender and sexuality were shaped across the Indian Ocean. Major topics include Islam, imperialism, indentured labor migration, liberalism and anti-colonialism. HISTGlobal
    HIST 1979K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pant
  • Intellectual Change: From Ottoman Modernization to the Turkish Republic (MES 1300)

  • Undergraduate Reading Courses

    Guided reading on selected topics. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S29
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Lubar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Meisel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Demuth
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Prospective Thesis Writers

    Prospective honors students are encouraged to enroll in HIST 1992 during semesters 5 or 6. HIST 1992 offers a consideration of historical methodology and techniques of writing and research with the goal of preparing to write a senior thesis in history. The course helps students refine research skills, define a project, and prepare a thesis prospectus, which is required for admission to honors. Students who complete honors may count HIST 1992 as a concentration requirement. Limited to juniors who qualify for the honors program. WRIT
    HIST 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part I

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. All students admitted to the History Honors Program must enroll in HIST 1993 for two semesters of thesis research and writing. They may enroll in the course during semesters 6 and 7, or 7 and 8. Course work entails researching, organizing, writing a history honors thesis. Presentation of work and critique of peers' work required. Limited to seniors and juniors who have been admitted to History Honors Program. HIST 1993 is a mandatory S/NC course. See History Concentration Honors Requirements.
    HIST 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part II

    This is the second half of a year-long course, upon completion the grade will revert to HIST 1993. Prerequisite: HIST 1993. WRIT
    HIST 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    HIST 2890 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 2910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S36
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Steinberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S43
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Colloquium

    Required of all first-year graduate students; includes participation in Thursday Lecture Series. E
    HIST 2930 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Historical Crossings: Empires and Modernity

    “Historical crossings” is a rough translation of histoire croisée, referring to global configurations of events and a shared history, rather than to a traditional comparative history. This Seminar is designed to be the cornerstone of the M.A. program. It will not serve as a traditional historical methods course but instead focus on training students to read and think on various scales of historical analysis—from cross-cultural and trans-geographic to the granularity of social and cultural specificity, requiring students to think both globally and locally and introducing them to an advanced level of historical inquiry, debate, and exploration.
    HIST 2935 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • Writing Workshop

    Required of all 3rd semester Ph.D. students.
    HIST 2940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Early Modern Continental Europe - Reading

    This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some major topics and debates in early modern European history, as well as a range of geographical, methodological, and historiographical perspectives. Readings combine recent works and classics to give a sense both of where the field has been and where it is going. Topics covered include political history, religious interactions (among Christians and between Christians, Jews and Muslims), urban history, the history of the book, Atlantic history, the history of science, and the Enlightenment. The class also provides the opportunity to explore a single topic of choice in greater depth.
    HIST 2970E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • Topics in 19th c. U.S. History

    This state-of-the-field course will introduce students to nineteenth-century U.S. history, with specific attention to how recent transnational, imperial, institutional, and cultural approaches have reframed older debates over the "Age of Jackson," "Manifest Destiny," and the "Market Revolution." This seminar offers core readings for students preparing a comprehensive exam field, while providing others with content knowledge to teach this period of American history.
    HIST 2971J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • 19th and 20th Century European History

    This is a graduate field seminar designed to introduce students to the historiography and recent scholarship of 19th and 20th century Europe. The primary goal of the seminar is to help students prepare for preliminary examinations in modern European history and to provide the essential conceptual tools for further research in the field. Each week will focus on a large theme or set of debates, which will be explored through in-depth explorations of assigned texts as well as recommended readings.
    HIST 2971V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Readings in Environmental History

    This course will introduce graduate students to major themes and problems in the field of environmental history. Topics will include climate, animals, the Anthropocene, empire, capitalism, comparative history, marine spaces, and the intersection of cultural, social, and gender history with the environment field. Readings will draw from classics and newly published material. Geography and time period are expansive. Discussion will use these works to ground major historiographical questions in environmental history, as well as issues of method, evidence, and narrative style.
    HIST 2971W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Demuth
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    HIST 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep