Courses for Spring 2016

  • The Philosophers' Stone: Alchemy From Antiquity to Harry Potter

    Alchemy today conjures Harry Potter or Full Metal Alchemist, not the serious scholarly tradition that captivated Isaac Newton and Carl Jung. We will explore alchemy’s long history, examining how it has endured and adapted to different cultural, social, intellectual, economic, and religious contexts. What did alchemists do? How did they explain their art? And why has alchemy come to represent fraud and folly in some circles and wisdom in others? Students will answer these questions by conducting research in the Hay. HIST 0150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation, and argument. Presumes no previous history courses. WRIT
    HIST 0150B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
  • Refugees: A Twentieth-Century History

    Refugees are arguably the most important social, political and legal category of the twentieth century. This introductory lecture course locates the emergence of the figure of the refugee in histories of border-making, nation-state formation and political conflicts across the twentieth century to understand how displacement and humanitarianism came to be organized as international responses to forms of exclusion, war, disaster and inequality.
    HIST 0150D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Modern Latin America

    This course is an introduction to the history of modern Latin America. Through lectures, discussions, shared readings, we will explore major themes in the past two hundred years of Latin American history, from the early nineteenth-century independence movements to the recent “Left Turn” in Latin American politics. Some of the topics we will examine include the racial politics of state-formation; the fraught history of U.S.-Latin American relations; the cultural politics of nationalism; how modernity was defined in relation to gender and sexuality; and the emergence of authoritarian regimes and revolutionary mobilizations, and the role of religion in shaping these processes.
    HIST 0234 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • Civilization, Empire, Nation: Competing Histories of the Middle East

    The “Middle East” is a recent invention. 100 years ago, virtually none of the states currently populating the region’s map existed. This course considers how historians (and others) have used the concepts of civilization, empire, and nation to construct competing narratives about this pivotal region’s past from the rise of Islam to the present. Since facts acquire meanings through interpretative frameworks, we ask: What is privileged and what is hidden in these narratives? And what would the history of this region look like if we could see it through the eyes of the peoples who have long lived there?
    HIST 0247 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
  • Modern American History: New and Different Perspectives

    Rather than a survey, this course uses specific episodes and events to reveal different modes of analysis. Examples of questions are: What do gender perspectives tell us about men on the frontier and women in dance halls? What is the importance of baseball to American culture? How do a historian and a lawyer differ in their analysis of a sensational crime case? How can we understand why the U.S. dropped two atomic bombs on Japan? How did scandals in television and popular music signal an end to American innocence? How has the Baby Boom generation altered American society? And more. WRIT
    HIST 0257 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • History of Medicine II: The Development of Scientific Medicine in Europe and the World

    From the 18th century onward, Western medicine has claimed universal validity due to its scientific foundations, relegating other kinds of medicine to the status of "alternative" practices. The course therefore examines the development of scientific medicine in Europe and elsewhere up to the late 20th century, and its relationships with other medical ideas, practices, and traditions. Students with a knowledge of languages and the social and natural sciences are welcome but no prerequisites are required.
    HIST 0286B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • An Empire and Republic: The Dutch Golden Age

    Between about 1580 and 1690, a new nation emerged in Europe that became a bastion of liberty, ideas in ferment, fine art, military power, science and technology, and global economic reach: the Dutch Republic. A nation that thought of itself as peaceful, yet was constantly at war; as Protestant, yet was composed of people of many faiths; as personally aspirational, yet derived much wealth from the conquest and slavery of others. Its people and institutional arrangements greatly influenced Britain and America on their paths to power, too. Its rise and eclipse may be instructive.. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS WRIT P
    HIST 0522G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • The Silk Road, Past and Present

    The Silk Road has historically been the crossroad of Eurasia; since the third-century BCE it has linked the societies of Asia—East, Central, and South—and Europe and the Middle East. The exchange of goods, ideas, and peoples that the Silk Road facilitated has significantly shaped the polities, economies, belief systems, and cultures of many modern nations: China, Russia, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, and India. This course explores the long history (and the mythologies or imaginations) of the Silk Road in order to understand how the long and complex pasts of the regions it touches are important in the age of globalization. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0574A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
  • History of the Holocaust (JUDS 0902)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 0902 (CRN 25465).
  • History of Intercollegiate Athletics (EDUC 0850)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 0850 (CRN 23828).
  • Brown v. Board of Education (EDUC 0610)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 0610 (CRN 23847).
  • Israel's Wars (JUDS 0050H)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 0050H (CRN 25282).
  • Extinction: A Global History (ENVS 0700C)

    Interested students must register for ENVS 0700C (CRN 26361).
  • Sub-Saharan Africa, c.1850-1946: Colonial Contexts and Everyday Experiences

    This course considers major actors and developments in sub-Saharan Africa from the mid-nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries. With a critical awareness of the ways that Africa's past has been narrated, it balances coverage of the state and economy with attention to daily life, families, and popular culture. The majority of the reading assignments are drawn from contemporary documents, commentaries, interviews, and memoirs. Works produced by historians supplements these. Students will analyze change, question perspectives, and imagine life during the age of European imperialism. Written assignments include a book review, two examinations, and identifying and editing a primary source text. WRIT
    HIST 1060 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • At China's Edges

    What does it mean to live on the borders of a rising world power? This course introduces the modern histories of such places as Hong Kong; Macau; Taiwan; Manchuria; Sichuan; Yunnan; and Xinjiang by investigating their commonalities and differences. Themes include: ecology and identity; comparative colonialisms and experiences of decolonization; war and border regions; nation building, citizenship, and the "art of not being governed." Students will have an opportunity to research additional sites (e.g. Mongolia, Tibet) using frameworks introduced in class discussions.
    HIST 1120 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Modern Japan

    Japan is a rich site for an exploration of many of the key processes and concepts that have shaped, and continue to transform, the modern world. These include the creation of the nation as the fundamental structure for social and political organization, a development that came late to Japan and had profound effects on its relationships with its neighbors, the crafting of its own histories, and with the emergence of debates about what it meant to be “Japanese.” The course also explores how ideas about gender, race, and tradition have been understood and made use of in modern Japan. WRIT
    HIST 1150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • The Fall of Empire and Rise of Kings: Greek History to 479 to 323 BCE

    The Greek world was transformed in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. The rise and fall of Empires (Athens and Persia) and the metamorphosis of Macedon into a supreme power under Philip II and Alexander the Great provide the headlines. The course covers an iconic period of history, explores life-changing events that affected the people of the eastern Mediterranean, and through these transformations, offers deep insight into the common pressures that ordinary people and their communities confronted. The course addresses political, social and economic history using literary, epigraphical and archaeological evidence. No prior knowledge of ancient history is required. P
    HIST 1200B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
  • History of Greece: From Alexander the Great to the Roman Conquest

    Covers the decline of Athens as the center of classical civilization; the conquests of Alexander the Great; the culture of the Greek elite and, to the extent that it's recoverable, of the indigenous populations of the Hellenistic world; and Greek contributions to what we call Western Civilization. P
    HIST 1200C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Birth of Modernist Culture in Fin-de-Siecle Europe

    A sequel to HIST 1230A focusing on radical intellectual and cultural currents that challenged and destabilized the assumptions of Victorian high culture during the fin de siecle. Through a careful reading of primary texts by Hobhouse, Nietzsche, Weber, and Freud. The course explores issues such as the rise of mass consumer culture, neoliberal and neofascist politics, philosophic irrationalism, psychoanalysis, and the woman question. WRIT
    HIST 1230B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Living Together: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Iberia

    A pressing issue in today's pluralistic societies is how people of different identities (religious, ethnic, etc.) can live together. This course explores a slice of history that can help us think through questions of difference in our world: medieval Spain, where for centuries Muslims, Christians, and Jews lived in close proximity. Through explicit juxtaposition with modern debates, this course examines how these people understood and structured their relations with each other in the Iberian Peninsula between 711 and 1492. Themes include: identity and cultural definition; power and religious violence; tolerance and intolerance; acculturation and assimilation; gender and sexuality. WRIT P
    HIST 1260D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • British History, 1660-1800

    A survey of British history from the restoration of monarchy to the Wilkes affair and the loss of the American colonies. In addition to political developments such as the Glorious Revolution and the rise of party, examines political ideology (including the great political theorist, John Locke) and various themes in social history (such as crime, popular protest, the sexual revolution, and the experiences of women). P
    HIST 1266D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • German History, 1806-1945

    This course examines the development of German history from the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire to the end of World War II. During that time the German states went from being a sleepy backwater to being the conquerors of Europe, finally conquered themselves by the Allied Forces. Through lecture, readings, and discussion we will examine post-Napoleonic Germany, Prussia’s role in uniting Germany, the Wilhelmine Empire, the Weimar Republic, and finally National Socialism. The class will take into account politics, economics, war, and culture in painting a full picture of the development of a distinct German state and society.
    HIST 1270C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Liberty, Equality, Fraternity? The History of Modern France

    This course follows the history of France from the time of Louis XIV to the present, focusing on social and cultural trends, with particular emphasis on the boundaries of French national identity. It asks who belonged to the French nation at key moments in French history, including the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era, industrialization, imperialism, and the two world wars, as well as the complex questions presently facing France. We will examine how inclusions and exclusions during these moments reveal larger themes within French history, such as those dealing with race, class, gender, immigration, and anti-Semitism, amongst others.
    HIST 1272C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • The Rise and Fall of the Aztecs: Mexico, 1300-1600

    This course will chart the evolution of the Mexica (better known as the Aztecs) from nomads to the dominant people of central Mexico; examine their political, cultural, and religious practices (including human sacrifice); explore the structure and limitations of their empire; and analyze their defeat by Spanish conquistadors and their response to European colonization. We will draw upon a variety of pre- and post-conquest sources, treating the Aztecs as a case study in the challenges of ethnohistory. P
    HIST 1331 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Antebellum America and the Road to Civil War

    Surveys society, culture, and politics between 1800 and 1860. Topics include the social order of slavery, the market revolution and its impact, abolition and other evangelical reform movements, and the development of sectional identities.
    HIST 1503 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • First Nations: The People and Cultures of Native North America to 1800

    This course explores the history of North America through the eyes of the original inhabitants from pre-contact times up through 1800. Far from a simplistic story of European conquest, the histories of Euroamericans and Natives were and continue to be intertwined in surprising ways. Although disease, conquest, and death are all part of this history, this course also tell another story: the big and small ways in which these First Nations shaped their own destiny, controlled resources, utilized local court systems, and drew on millennia-old rituals and practices to sustain their communities despite the crushing weight of colonialism. WRIT P
    HIST 1512 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • The Intimate State: The Politics of Gender, Sex, and Family in the U.S., 1873-Present

    Examines the "intimate politics" of gender norms, sex and sexuality, and family structure in American history, from the 1870s to the present, focusing on law and political conflict. Topics include laws regulating sex and marriage; social norms governing gender roles in both private and public spheres; the range of political perspectives (from feminist to conservative) on sex, sexuality, and family, and the relationship of gender to notions of nationhood and the role of the modern state. Some background in history strongly recommended.
    HIST 1530 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • American Empire Since 1890

    This survey of twentieth-century US foreign relations will focus on the interplay between the rise of the United States as a superpower and American culture and society. Topics include: ideology and U.S. foreign policy, imperialism and American political culture, U.S. social movements and international affairs, and the relationship between U.S. power abroad and domestic race, gender and class arrangements.
    HIST 1554 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • American Legal and Constitutional History

    History of American law and constitutions from European settlement to the end of the 20th century. Not a comprehensive survey but a study of specific issues or episodes connecting law and history, including witchcraft trials, slavery, contests over Native American lands, delineations of race and gender, regulation of morals and the economy, and the construction of privacy.
    HIST 1570 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • From Medieval Bedlam to Prozac Nation: Intimate Histories of Psychiatry and Self

    Humankind has long sought out keepers of its secrets and interpreters of its dreams: seers, priests, and, finally, psychiatrists. This lecture course will introduce students to the history of psychiatry in Europe, the United States, and beyond, from its pre-modern antecedents through the present day. Our focus will be on the long age of asylum psychiatry, but we will also consider the medical and social histories that intersect with, but are not contained by, asylum psychiatry: the rise of modern diagnostic systems, psychoanalysis, sexuality and stigma, race, eugenics, and pharmaceutical presents and futures.
    HIST 1830M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • Unearthing the Body: History, Archaeology, and Biology at the End of Antiquity

    How was the physical human body imagined, understood, and treated in life and death in the late ancient Mediterranean world? Drawing on evidence from written sources, artistic representations, and archaeological excavations, this class will explore this question by interweaving thematic lectures and student analysis of topics including disease and medicine, famine, asceticism, personal adornment and ideals of beauty, suffering, slavery, and the boundaries between the visible world and the afterlife, in order to understand and interpret the experiences of women, men, and children who lived as individuals—and not just as abstractions—at the end of antiquity. P
    HIST 1835A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
  • History of American School Reform (EDUC 1200)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1200 (CRN 23827).
  • Introduction to Yiddish Culture (JUDS 1713)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1713 (CRN 24245).
  • The Culture of Death in Ancient Rome (CLAS 1420)

    Interested students must register for CLAS 1420 (CRN 25199).
  • Barbarians, Byzantines, and Berbers: Early Medieval North Africa, AD 300-1050

    This class explores the transition from antiquity to the Middle Ages through the lens of western North Africa. Divided internally by theological disputes and inter-communal violence, and subjected to repeated conquests and reconquests from the outside, in this period North Africa witnessed the triumph of Islam over Christianity; the rise and fall of ephemeral kingdoms, empires, and caliphates; the gradual desertion of once-prosperous cities and rural settlements; the rising strength of Berber confederations; and the continuing ability of trade to transcend political boundaries and to link the southern Mediterranean littoral to the outside world. WRIT P
    HIST 1963L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
  • The English Revolution

    Looks at the origins and nature of the English Civil War and Republican experiment in government (1642-1660) through a close examination of primary source materials. Considers not only the constitutional conflict between the crown and parliament, but also the part played by those out-of-doors in the revolutionary upheaval, the rise of popular radicalism, and the impact of events in Scotland and Ireland. P
    HIST 1964E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • She's So Chic! Fashion, Gender, and Nationalism in French History

    From its beginnings, the fashion industry in France has been synonymous with the international reputation of the nation. Similarly, being “chic,” having an innate sense of discernment and style, became synonymous with French femininity. This seminar will explore the interconnectivity of the history of fashion in France, the requirements it placed on French women, and the pressures the fashion industry has borne since the 1700s. We will look at how fashion reflected and created the moods of various periods, and we will also see how French women’s national belonging has been innately tied to ability to display French fashion.
    HIST 1965O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • Making Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-Present

    In January 1959, the forces of rebel leader Fidel Castro entered Havana and forever altered the destiny of their nation and world. We will examine the question of political hegemony and the many silences built into the achievement of Revolution—from race to sexuality to culture—even as we acknowledge that popular support for that Revolution has often been both genuine and heartfelt. It is this counterpoint between the Revolution’s successes in the social, economic, and political spheres and its equally patent exclusions that have shaped Cuba’s history in the past and will continue to guide its path to an uncertain future. WRIT
    HIST 1967C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • In the Shadow of Revolution: Mexico Since 1940

    This course traces political, social, and economic developments in Mexico since the consolidation of the revolutionary regime in the 1930s. The topics addressed include: the post World War II economic “miracle”; the rise of new social movements; the Tlatelolco massacre; the deepening crisis of the PRI (the governing party) in the 1980s and 1990s; the Zapatista rebellion; violence and migration on the northern border; and the war against narcotraficantes.
    HIST 1967E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • History of Rio de Janeiro

    From colonial outpost to capital of the Portuguese Empire, from sleepy port to urban megalopolis, this seminar examines the history of Rio de Janeiro from the sixteenth century to the present. Using an interdisciplinary perspective rooted in historical analyses, we will analyze multiple representations of the city, its people, and geography in relationship to Brazilian history, culture, and society.
    HIST 1967R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • Islamic Law and Societies: Evolution and Revolutions

    This seminar engages the question of change and continuity in the Islamic legal tradition from medieval to modern times. From the classical jurisprudence of al-Ghazali to late Ottoman constitutionalism, and the consequences of the 1979 Iranian Revolution to the Arab Spring uprisings, our goal is to explore the diversity and historicity of Islamic law across chronological and geographic space. As we probe questions at the juncture of law, religion, and politics in and outside the Middle East, course readings and discussions will reflect the perspectives of both historians and lawyers, as well as the newly emergent genre of “sociolegal” history.
    HIST 1968L S02
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
  • Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples II

    This advanced undergraduate seminar seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the links between the region now known as Israel and Palestine and the peoples that have inhabited it or have made it into part of their mental, mythical. and religious landscape throughout history. The course will be interdisciplinary at its very core, engaging the perspectives of historians, geologists, geographers, sociologists, scholars of religion and the arts, politics and media. At the very heart of the seminar is the question: What makes for the bond between groups and place - real or imagined, tangible or ephemeral. No prerequisites required. WRIT
    HIST 1969B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • Enslaved! Indians and Africans in an Unfree Atlantic World

    This course examines the varieties of Indian and African enslavement in the Atlantic world, including North America, up through 1800. Reading widely in recent literature in the field as well as in primary sources from the colonial period, we will ponder the origins, practices, meanings, and varieties of enslavement, along with critiques and points of resistance by enslaved peoples and Europeans. Special emphasis will be given to the lived nature of enslavement, and the activity of Indians and Africans to navigate and resist these harsh realities. A final project or paper is required, but there are no prerequisites. P
    HIST 1970B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • American Legal History, 1760-1920

    Undergraduate seminar on the United States and international law. Focuses mainly on the period before the twentieth century. Examines subjects such as the right of revolution; the evolution of U.S. Constitution law; law as an instrument of economic development and exploitation; and the evolution of rights-consciousness—all within the context of international law. Enrollment limited to 20. Students should contact the instructor before the beginning of the semester if they are interested in taking the course. Instructor permission required. WRIT
    HIST 1972A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World

    This seminar is an experiment in thinking a global history of the making of the modern world. We read texts that track the movement of 
ideas, peoples and goods, the formation of political and economic inequalities and the continuous struggles of ordinary people against them. From empires to nation-states, from anti-imperialist nationalist struggles to transnational radical movements, this seminar grapples with the politics of knowledge for drawing out “fugitive” lineages of the past that we need to shape our collective future. No overrides will be given before the semester begins. Interested students must attend first class meeting.
    HIST 1974J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Early Modern Globalization

    What can the experience of a minority group like the Jews teach us about roots of globalization? What were the economic, political, and cultural conditions that allowed early modern Jewish merchants to create economic networks stretching from India to the New World? We will answer these questions by examining the connections and interactions between four major Jewish centers: Ottoman Jewry in the Eastern Mediterranean, the Port Jews of Amsterdam and London, Polish-Jewish estate managers in Ukraine, and the Court Jews of central Europe. We will see how European expansion exploited - and was exploited by - these Jewish entrepreneurs. P
    HIST 1974M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • Native Histories in Latin America and North America

    From Alaska to Argentina, Native people have diverse histories. Spain, Portugal, England and France established different colonial societies; indigenous Latin Americans today have a different historical legacy than Native Americans in the United States. But the experiences of conquest, resistance and adaptation also tell a single overarching story. In colonial times, Native Americans and Europeans struggled over and shared the land. After Independence, however, the new American republics tried to destroy American Indians through war and assimilation. But in the last century Native peoples (both North and South) reasserted their identities within modern states: the "vanishing Indian" refused to vanish. WRIT DPLL
    HIST 1976A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • The Anthropocene: Climate Change as Social History

    This seminar will explore ramifications of the concept of the Anthropocene. The Anthropocene has been proposed as a new human-driven geologic age that began with the increased exploitation of fossil fuels in the late eighteenth century. Its proponents emphasize transformations through anthropogenic climate change, but we will also consider the effects of population growth, pollution, habitat destruction, and extinction. To assess the historical validity of the concept, we will discuss the impact of humans on the environment before 1800, the extent of transformation since 1800, and whether human-environmental interactions can be usefully generalized to our species as a whole. WRIT
    HIST 1976E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • The World of Isaac Newton

    This course will focus on the work of Isaac Newton in the context of his times and its impact in the centuries that followed. WRIT P
    HIST 1976I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
  • Histories of the Future

    This course is for students interested in how ideas about what the future of human societies would look like have developed over time, and in the impact of those ideas on cultural, social and political norms. We will look carefully at examples of early modern prophecy before turning to the more recent emergence of theories of economic and social progress, plans for utopian communities, and markedly less optimistic and often dark visions of where we’re headed. We will also explore the roles capitalism, popular culture, and science have played in shaping the practices and vocabularies associated with imagining the future. WRIT
    HIST 1976R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Gender, Race, and Medicine in the Americas

    This seminar explores the gendered and racial histories of disease and medicine in nineteenth and twentieth century Latin America and the United States. From the dark history of obstetrics and slavery in the antebellum U.S. South to twentieth-century efforts to curb venereal disease in revolutionary Mexico or U.S.-occupied Puerto Rico, to debates over HIV policy in Cuba and Brazil—together we will explore how modern medicine has shaped both race and gender in the Americas. Topics we will explore include environmental health and the body; infant mortality; the medicalization of birth; and the colonial/imperial history of new reproductive technologies.
    HIST 1977I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • Piracy, Patents and Intellectual Property

    Intellectual ownership is one of the most intractable problems in contemporary social and economic life. This course explores the emergence and significance of intellectual ownership in the domains of art, architecture, literature, scientific innovation, media, and law. We are particularly interested in the different social, geographic and national contexts in which regimes of intellectual ownership surfaced, and how different national agencies, individuals, and corporate formations variously construct and enforce understandings of ownership and infringement. We will also canvass contemporary enforcement and implementation mechanisms, global north versus global south wealth disparities, and the fate of intellectual property in the digital world.
    HIST 1979M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gostenhofer
  • American Charters

    This seminar will read deeply in thirteen seminal texts from American history. Exploring the context in which each document was written, the intentions of the author(s), the medium of publication, the way audiences experienced the document, and its reception throughout history, arguing that charter documents have assumed high importance in the United States, a nation with little precedent to build upon. From John Winthrop's "City Upon a Hill" speech, which may never have been given, to Second Inaugural of Barack Obama, we'll consider the ways in which ambitious writers/speakers have tried to claim authorship for the narrative of American history.
    HIST 1979N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
  • Comparative Black Power

    Fifty years ago, in 1966, Stokley Carmichael made his legendary call for “Black Power!” That call was global, marked by its diversity. How did the idea of Black Power travel? Why did it emerge when and where it did, and what were its meanings in different contexts? This course examines the manifestations of black power movements in the Caribbean and in Africa, in the United States and in India. With the 50th anniversary in mind, this course will critically explore the dreams, international dimensions, gender politics, and legacies of Black Power.
    HIST 1979O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrowes
  • History of Chinese Medicine

    In the past several decades consumer discontent with Western medicine has prompted an unprecedented interest in other methods of healing. As the longest continuous literate tradition on the planet Chinese culture has enduring experience in healthcare provision, making it an attractive alternative to biomedicine. In this course we survey the depth and complexity of the Chinese medical tradition through the lens of indigenous techniques and their permutations in diverse locales. Proceeding from the earliest written records on oracle bones to present day ethnographies of clinical practice, we will complement close readings of canonical texts with a focus on lived experience.
    HIST 1979P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burton-Rose
  • Japanese Film and Animation of the 20th Century

    Recent years have seen an explosion of worldwide interest in Japanese popular media, including manga (comics), anime (animation), and films. Yet Japan’s current success in exporting films/anime abroad is by no means just a recent phenomenon. We will explore Japanese live action film/animation from its origins through turn of 21st century. Students will learn to read films as narrative texts, and critiquing them on multiple levels. In the process, we will attempt to seek out what about Japanese cinematic art has caught the attention of Western critics, keeping our eyes on questions of identity and responses to historical events.
    HIST 1979Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Frydman
  • Scientific Controversies from Creationism to Climate Change

    This course examines scientific controversies from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Topics will include evolution, telepathy, eugenics, lobotomy, recovered memories, vaccination, cloning, and global warming. We will study what these controversies tell us about the shifting relationship between science and society, how changes in scientific paradigms occur, why some controversies resolve, and why others persist, even in the face of long-standing scientific consensus. Students will learn to see science not as a progressive series of discoveries in the eternal pursuit of truth, but as an often messy historical process fully embedded in the politics and culture of its time.
    HIST 1979R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Searcy
  • Modernism and Its Critics

    This course explores how European writers interpreted modern art and manners between 1850 and 1940. As a crucial figure in emerging modern world, the cultural critic aimed to explain the meaning of style for society. Consequently, cultural critics created rich primary resources for understanding politics, beliefs, and everyday life activities. We will especially focus on anxiety about modern life expressed in controversies over avant garde movements from impressionists to expressionists, realists to the surrealists. We will cover issues like hysteria, men’s fashion, music, vacations, sexuality, and advertising. In addition to lesser known figures, selected readings include Baudelaire, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Kafka.
    HIST 1979T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gentry
  • The Business of Empire: History of Capitalism and U.S. Foreign Relations, 1900 to the Present

    This course explores the intersections between American business and American Empire during the twentieth century. From the United Fruit Company in Latin America to the arms manufacturers at Lockheed Martin, the interests of capital have shaped U.S. foreign relations. As students race this history across the twentieth century, they will learn how the rise of American business to global preeminence depended upon a supportive, interventionist government. This course will appeal to history, IR, and Economics concentrators among others.
    HIST 1979U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rosenberg
  • Technologies of the Soul: The History of Healing

    Movements that sought to heal society formed a distinct counterpoint to establishment science, religion and culture throughout modernity. In this course, we will examine distinctly modern, non-medical forms of healing from the late 18th until the mid twentieth centuries. This course engages cultural history and theory, science, opera and religion asking whether movements such as Mesmerism, Wagnerism, or Anthroposophy formed a hopeful expansion of the healing role of science art and religion? Or did such developments subvert established norms that provoked anxiety? Ultimately we will probe the limits of the humanities while exploring movements that have challenged such boundaries.
    HIST 1979V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Peace, Justice and Human Rights in a Global Age

    This course explores the history of the major themes, problems and ideals of global peace, justice and human rights. We investigate the theoretical, social and political elements within these ideals and practices, spanning broad temporal and spatial genealogies of human thought. From biopolitics to geopolitics, we uncover attempts to demand food security, health care, and dignity as universal human rights. We highlight philosophies of peace and ethics, and unpack competing conceptions of “justice.” Among other topics, the political economy of global survival plays an important role in this perspective, especially within bioethics and environmental justice.
    HIST 1979Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Knapp
  • Portuguese Discoveries and Early Modern Globalization (POBS 1600D)

    Interested students must register for POBS 1600D (CRN 25602).
  • Urban Schools in Historical Perspective (EDUC 1720)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1720 (CRN 23846).
  • Popular Culture, 1400-1800 (ITAL 1430)

    Interested students must register for ITAL 1430 (CRN 25751).
  • Jewish Humor and Commercial Entertainment in Early 20th-Century Europe and America (JUDS 1726)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1726 (CRN 26118).
  • Undergraduate Reading Courses

    Guided reading on selected topics. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Lubar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Prospective Thesis Writers

    Prospective honors students are encouraged to enroll in HIST 1992 during semesters 5 or 6. HIST 1992 offers a consideration of historical methodology and techniques of writing and research with the goal of preparing to write a senior thesis in history. The course helps students refine research skills, define a project, and prepare a thesis prospectus, which is required for admission to honors. Students who complete honors may count HIST 1992 as a concentration requirement. Limited to juniors who qualify for the honors program. WRIT
    HIST 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part I

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. All students admitted to the History Honors Program must enroll in HIST 1993 for two semesters of thesis research and writing. They may enroll in the course during semesters 6 and 7, or 7 and 8. Course work entails researching, organizing, writing a history honors thesis. Presentation of work and critique of peers' work required. Limited to seniors and juniors who have been admitted to History Honors Program. HIST 1993 is a mandatory S/NC course. See History Concentration Honors Requirements.
    HIST 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part II

    This is the second half of a year-long course, upon completion the grade will revert to HIST 1993. Prerequisite: HIST 1993. WRIT
    HIST 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    HIST 2890 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 2910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Steinberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Professionalization Seminar

    Required of all second year Ph.D. students; includes participation in Thursday Lecture Series. E
    HIST 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • Prospectus Development Seminar

    This required course open only to second-year students in the History Ph.D. program focuses on the development of a dissertation prospectus. The seminar will include considering the process of choosing a dissertation topic, selecting a dissertation committee, identifying viable dissertation projects, articulating a project in the form of a prospectus, and developing research grant proposals based on the prosectus. E
    HIST 2960 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • Approaches to Middle East History

    An overview of canonical and recent scholarship on the Middle East, beginning with neo-Orientalist and Modernization-theory writings that ruled until the early 1960s, then a consideration of two turns often in productive tension with each other: materialist approaches that lead to social history and political economy, and discursive approaches that lead to cultural and post-colonial studies. We then consider works on the environment and techno-politics, gender and sexuality, and law and society, among others. Throughout, we consider how theoretical trends in other disciplines shaped the writing of history. Requirements include weekly essays, oral presentations, and a literature review.
    HIST 2971R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • First Person History in Times of Crisis: Witnessing, Memory, Fiction

    This seminar examines the relationship between History as a narrative of events and history as individual experience. Postulating that historical events as related by historians were experienced in numerous different ways by their protagonists, the seminar focuses on the complementary and contradictory aspects of this often fraught relationship at times of crisis, especially in war and genocide. While much time will be spent on World War II and the Holocaust, the seminar will engage with other modern wars and genocides across the world. Materials will include eyewitness reports, postwar testimonies and trial records, memoirs and relevant works of fiction. Open to graduate students only. M
    HIST 2980W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • The Body

    This seminar will consider theories of the body as a site of knowledge, politics, culture, gender, and identification in a broad range of temporal and geographic contexts. We will also examine how historians have written the history of the body, and what sources they have used to do so.
    HIST 2981J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
  • Ritual Studies For Everyday Life

    This course explores the methods and frameworks of ritual and spatial analysis as applied widely across fields of history. Readings reflect theory and practice from anthropology, archaeology, cultural and religious studies; and the histories of architecture, cities, economy, the environment, memory, politics, religion, and science. The goal of the course is to discover how studying spatial arrangements and ritual relationships (broadly conceived) can be used as tools in historical work, and to discuss where historians can learn method from other disciplines and vice versa.
    HIST 2981K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    HIST 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep