Courses for Spring 2017

  • Refugees: A Twentieth-Century History

    Refugees are arguably the most important social, political and legal category of the twentieth century. This introductory lecture course locates the emergence of the figure of the refugee in histories of border-making, nation-state formation and political conflicts across the twentieth century to understand how displacement and humanitarianism came to be organized as international responses to forms of exclusion, war, disaster and inequality.
    HIST 0150D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Pirates

    As long as ships have sailed, pirates have preyed upon them. This course examines piracy from ancient times to present, from the Mediterranean Sea to the Indian Ocean and the Caribbean. We will explore questions: How did piracy evolve over time? Where, why, and how did people become pirates, and what (if anything) made them different from other seafarers? How is piracy related to other historical processes, notably imperialism and nation-building? What explains the resurgence of piracy in the twenty-first century? Why have pirates become the stuff of legend, and how accurately are they portrayed in books and films?
    HIST 0150F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Modern Africa: From Empire to Nation-State

    This course examines the major historical developments in Africa from 1945 to the present and pays special attention to the diversity of experiences within the vast continent. The first part focuses on Africans’ varied responses to the waning European imperial project and explores different ways in which African nationalist leaders and everyday people challenged colonial administrations to ultimately achieve their independence. The second part of the class investigates the consequences and opportunities of decolonization, including questions of political legitimacy, state-building, structural adjustment programs and international aid, human rights, and civil conflicts.
    HIST 0203 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Johnson
  • Modern Latin America

    This course is an introduction to the history of modern Latin America. Through lectures, discussions, shared readings, we will explore major themes in the past two hundred years of Latin American history, from the early nineteenth-century independence movements to the recent “Left Turn” in Latin American politics. Some of the topics we will examine include the racial politics of state-formation; the fraught history of U.S.-Latin American relations; the cultural politics of nationalism; how modernity was defined in relation to gender and sexuality; and the emergence of authoritarian regimes and revolutionary mobilizations, and the role of religion in shaping these processes.
    HIST 0234 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • Modern American History: New and Different Perspectives

    Rather than a survey, this course uses specific episodes and events to reveal different modes of analysis. Examples of questions are: What do gender perspectives tell us about men on the frontier and women in dance halls? What is the importance of baseball to American culture? How do a historian and a lawyer differ in their analysis of a sensational crime case? How can we understand why the U.S. dropped two atomic bombs on Japan? How did scandals in television and popular music signal an end to American innocence? How has the Baby Boom generation altered American society? And more. WRIT
    HIST 0257 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • From the Columbian Exchange to Climate Change: Modern Global Environmental History

    Environmental stories are constantly in the news, from weird weather to viral outbreaks to concerns about extinction and fracking. In this course, we put current events in the context of the past 500 years, exploring how climate, plants, animals, and microbiota – not just humans –acted as agents in history. From imperialism to the industrial revolution and from global capitalism to environmental activism, we will examine how nature and culture intermingled to create the modern world. This is an introduction to environmental history and assumes no prior courses.
    HIST 0270B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Demuth
  • Tropical Delights: Imagining Brazil in History and Culture

    Examines the many ways that Brazilians and foreigners have understood this vast continent-size country, ranging from early European explorers' anxieties about Cannibalism to modern images of the Amazonian rainforest, Rio De Janeiro's freewheeling Carnival celebrations, and the array of social movements mobilizing for social justice. Through an examination of historical sources, literature, movies, and popular culture, this seminar will consider how multiple images and projections of Brazil have shaped national and international notions about the country. Reserved for First Year students. Enrollment limited to 20. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0537B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • The Chinese Diaspora: A History of Globalization

    Why are there Chinese in the US, Canada, Mexico, Cuba, Peru? Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines? Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Guam, Samoa? Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Cape Verde, Ghana? Spain, Germany, France, Russia, Czech Republic? Mauritius, Madagascar? India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar? Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan? How and when did 50 million Chinese find their way around the world during the past 500 years, from the Ming Dynasty to the present moment? We will explore worldwide distribution of ethnic Chinese through Time (history) and Space (culture) in the so-called “Chinese diaspora,” and examine questions of migration, identity, belonging, politics and conflict. FYS WRIT DPLL
    HIST 0577A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
  • Welfare States and a History of Modern Life

    History of the American welfare state, from its origins in nineteenth-century industrial capitalism to contemporary debates about health care, in comparative perspective. Why did welfare states appear and what form did the U.S. version take? Considerations of social inequality, labor relations, race, gender, family policy, the social wage, and the relationship between markets and the state are all considered. Some comparison with European models. SOPH WRIT
    HIST 0654A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • Walden + Woodstock: The American Lives of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Bob Dylan

    Emerson and Dylan are cultural icons. Emerson has been called “Mr. America” and Dylan has just won the Nobel Prize for Literature. Both had boundless energy for public performance and self-representation; both actively supported turning points in the civil rights struggle; both raged against American military aggression; both were at the epicenter of a wide circle of intellectuals, while denying their own centrality. What is the celebrity intellectual’s responsibility to society while remaining true to oneself? Poems, essays, autobiographies, songs, and movies provide insight into these eternally fascinating geniuses and their times. SOPH WRIT
    HIST 0658D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • History of the Holocaust (JUDS 0902)

  • History of Intercollegiate Athletics (EDUC 0850)

  • The Border/La Frontera (ETHN 0090A)

  • Israel's Wars (JUDS 0050H)

  • Food for Thought: Food and Agriculture in the History of the Americas (ENVS 0700D)

  • South African History

    This course examines major themes of history of southern Africa from the earliest times until 1994, with heavy emphasis on historiographical debates. Our discussions of the South African past will always be informed by a consideration of the approach of the scholars who have interpreted and presented it as history. Our major questions concern the origins of historical change and the creation of racial groups. We will probe the significance of race in South African history but also the limitations of its explanatory power. Course will meet twice a week for lecture and discussion groups will meet once a week. WRIT
    HIST 1030 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Modern Japan

    Japan is a rich site for an exploration of many of the key processes and concepts that have shaped, and continue to transform, the modern world. These include the creation of the nation as the fundamental structure for social and political organization, a development that came late to Japan and had profound effects on its relationships with its neighbors, the crafting of its own histories, and with the emergence of debates about what it meant to be “Japanese.” The course also explores how ideas about gender, race, and tradition have been understood and made use of in modern Japan. WRIT
    HIST 1150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Roman History II: The Empire

    The social and political history of the Roman Empire (14-565 CE). Focuses on expansion, administration, and Romanization of the empire; crisis of the 3rd century; militarization of society and monarchy; the struggle between paganism and Christianity; the end of the Empire in the West. Special attention given to the role of women, slaves, law, and historiography. Ancient sources in translation. WRIT
    HIST 1201B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
  • Formation of the Classical Heritage: Greeks, Romans, Jews, Christians, and Muslims

    Explores essential social, cultural, and religious foundation blocks of Western Civilization, 200 BCE to 800 CE. The main theme is the eternal struggle between universalism and particularism, including: Greek elitism vs. humanism; Roman imperialism vs. inclusion; Jewish assimilation vs. orthodoxy; Christian fellowship vs. exclusion, and Islamic transcendence vs. imminence. We will study how ancient Western individuals and societies confronted oppression and/or dramatic change and developed intellectual and spiritual strategies still in use today. Students should be prepared to examine religious thought from a secular point of view. There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge of the period. P WRIT
    HIST 1202 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Crusaders and Cathedrals, Deviants and Dominance: Europe in the High Middle Ages

    Popes named Joan, Gothic cathedrals, and crusaders-all these were produced by rich world of the western European Middle Ages. The cultural, religious, and social history of this period are explored with special attention to the social construction of power, gender roles, and relations between Christians and non-Christians. WRIT P
    HIST 1211 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • Revolution and Romanticism in 19th century Europe

    A lecture course, primarily for juniors and seniors, that focuses on salient philosophic, artistic, and ideological currents of 19th-century Europe. Beginning with the crisis of political and cultural legitimacy posed by the French Revolution, it concludes with the consolidation of bourgeois culture in the 1860s and 1870s and the two great scientific systematizers of these decades: Darwin and Marx. WRIT
    HIST 1230A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • British History, 1660-1800

    A survey of British history from the restoration of monarchy to the Wilkes affair and the loss of the American colonies. In addition to political developments such as the Glorious Revolution and the rise of party, examines political ideology (including the great political theorist, John Locke) and various themes in social history (such as crime, popular protest, the sexual revolution, and the experiences of women). P WRIT
    HIST 1266D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • Liberty, Equality, Fraternity? The History of Modern France

    This course follows the history of France from the time of Louis XIV to the present, focusing on social and cultural trends, with particular emphasis on the boundaries of French national identity. It asks who belonged to the French nation at key moments in French history, including the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era, industrialization, imperialism, and the two world wars, as well as the complex questions presently facing France. We will examine how inclusions and exclusions during these moments reveal larger themes within French history, such as those dealing with race, class, gender, immigration, and anti-Semitism, amongst others.
    HIST 1272C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • Death from Medieval Relics to Forensic Science

    From CSI: Crime Scene Investigation to Ghost Busters to murder mysteries, western society finds death and dead bodies both fascinating and horrifying. This lecture course considers how the western world has dealt with life’s most fundamental truth – all humans die – by looking at the history of death and dead bodies from the Middle Ages up to the early twentieth century. Topics include the worship of Christian relics, Catholic and Protestant conceptions of the “good death,” body snatching and dissection, society’s fascination with murder, execution as legalized death, forensic science and dead bodies, and ghosts.
  • Brazil: From Abolition to Emerging Global Power

    How did Brazil transform itself from a slave society in 1888 to rising international economic and political force? This course will examine the history of Brazil from the end of slavery to the present. We will analyze the reasons for the fall of the Empire and the establishment of a Republic, the transformations that took place as immigrants arrived from Europe, Japan, and the Middle East in the early twentieth century, and the search for new forms of national identity. We will study the rise of authoritarian regimes and the search for democratic governance in more recent years.
    HIST 1312 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • The Making of the Ottoman World, 15th - 20th Centuries

    This course treats some of the major themes of Ottoman state and society, one of the major empires of the world out of which many new polities in the Balkans, Anatolia, the Middle East and North Africa emerged during the twentieth century. At the center of the course is the transformation of the “classical” Ottoman state to the early modern and modern through the many shapes and forms it has taken. We will be covering the beginnings from the 15th century and end with the analysis of the making of the modern Ottoman society in the early 20th century.
    HIST 1445 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Toksoz
  • Women in Early America

    This course examines the major social and cultural developments of early America through the lens of women’s history. We will explore differences among representations of women, constructions and ideals of womanhood, and lived experiences, as we engage such topics as: cross-cultural exchange and conflict; citizenship and enslavement; work and cultural expression; and women’s varying degrees of access within social, civic and legal arenas. Relying heavily on sources like letters, diaries, legal records, and artifacts, we will work to identify strategies and best practices for recovering the voices and experiences of early American women buried in the archive.
    HIST 1520 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Tardif
  • American Empire Since 1890

    This survey of twentieth-century US foreign relations will focus on the interplay between the rise of the United States as a superpower and American culture and society. Topics include: ideology and U.S. foreign policy, imperialism and American political culture, U.S. social movements and international affairs, and the relationship between U.S. power abroad and domestic race, gender and class arrangements.
    HIST 1554 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • Science at the Crossroads

    This course will look closely at the dramatic developments that fundamentally challenged Western Science between 1859 and the advent of the Second World War in the 1930s. Its primary focus will be on a variety of texts written in an effort to understand and interpret the meanings of fundamentally new ideas including from the biological side--evolutionary theory, genetic theory, and eugenics; from the physical side relativity theory, and quantum mechanics. The class should be equally accessible to students whose primary interests lie in the sciences and those who are working in the humanities. WRIT
    HIST 1825M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
  • From Medieval Bedlam to Prozac Nation: Intimate Histories of Psychiatry and Self

    Humankind has long sought out keepers of its secrets and interpreters of its dreams: seers, priests, and, finally, psychiatrists. This lecture course will introduce students to the history of psychiatry in Europe, the United States, and beyond, from its pre-modern antecedents through the present day. Our focus will be on the long age of asylum psychiatry, but we will also consider the medical and social histories that intersect with, but are not contained by, asylum psychiatry: the rise of modern diagnostic systems, psychoanalysis, sexuality and stigma, race, eugenics, and pharmaceutical presents and futures.
    HIST 1830M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • History of American School Reform (EDUC 1200)

  • Black Freedom Struggle Since 1945 (AFRI 1090)

  • Life During Wartime: Theory and Sources from the Twentieth Century

    This course asks how we are to understand war as everyday experience, and what separates war from, or connects it to, the other great movements of mass social and political disruption that the twentieth century has seen. The first part of the semester will examine different frameworks scholars and thinkers have proposed for understanding war as modern experience (militarization, trauma, collective memory, states of exception, etc.) In the second part we will investigate the uses and limitations of specific types of primary sources, drawn from China's war with Japan. Students will choose their own topics for final projects.
    HIST 1962B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Sex, Power, and God: A Medieval Perspective

    Cross-dressing knights, virgin saints, homophobic priests, and mystics who speak in the language of erotic desire are but some of the medieval people considered in this seminar. This course examines how conceptions of sin, sanctity, and sexuality in the High Middle Ages intersected with structures of power in this period. While the seminar primarily focuses on Christian culture, it also considers Muslim and Jewish experience. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT P
    HIST 1963Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • Slavery in the Early Modern World

    There were multiple forms of slavery in the Early Modern world. We will look at three major systems: Mediterranean slavery and the Barbary Corsairs, Black Sea slavery and slave elites of the Ottoman Empire, and the Atlantic triangular trade. We will examine the religious, political, racial, and economic bases for these slave systems, and compare the experiences of individual slaves and slave societies. Topics discussed include gender and sexuality (e.g. the institution of the Harem and the eunuchs who ran it), the connection between piracy and slavery, and the roles of slavery in shaping the Western world.
    HIST 1964L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • The Maya in the Modern World

    This seminar focuses on the Maya in postcolonial Guatemala. The main theme is the evolving relationship between indigenous peoples and the nation-state. Topics include peasant rebellions in the nineteenth century, the development and redefinition of ethnic identities, the military repression of the 1970s and 1980s, the Rigoberta Menchú controversy, and the Maya diaspora in Mexico and the United States. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT
    HIST 1967F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples II

    This advanced undergraduate seminar seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the links between the region now known as Israel and Palestine and the peoples that have inhabited it or have made it into part of their mental, mythical. and religious landscape throughout history. The course will be interdisciplinary at its very core, engaging the perspectives of historians, geologists, geographers, sociologists, scholars of religion and the arts, politics and media. At the very heart of the seminar is the question: What makes for the bond between groups and place - real or imagined, tangible or ephemeral. No prerequisites required. WRIT
    HIST 1969B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • Debates in Middle Eastern History

    This seminar investigates the historical bases of some of the major debates which continue to dominate contemporary discussions on the Middle East. These include debates on colonialism and its legacies; problems associated with the post-colonial Middle Eastern state (the "democracy deficit": human rights; oil; political Islam); and arguments about the causes and consequences of some of the major events in Middle Eastern history (the Israel-Palestinian conflict; the Iranian revolution; the Lebanese civil war; 9/11 and the Iraq invasion; and the Arab Spring).
    HIST 1969C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mitter
  • Palestine versus the Palestinians

    Strange as it may sound, there is a tremendous tension between the concepts “Palestine” (territory) and the “Palestinians” (identity). Historically, one exists only at the expense of the other. Similarly, Palestinians and Israelis claim to be separate entities, but they are best understood in relation to each other. To explore these paradoxes, students are introduced to alternative frameworks for understanding the colonial ideologies and practices that transformed Palestine into Israel and that still govern the relationship between Palestinians and Israelis. Students will have an opportunity to attend planned workshops on Palestinian-Israeli studies and Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Displacement.
    HIST 1969D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • Colonial Encounters: Indians, Europeans, and the Making of Early America

    This seminar explores Native American histories and cultures in North America, primarily through the multiple and overlapping points of contact and coexistence with Europeans from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries. Although we will be reading widely in the very interesting recent literature in the field, a major component of the class is to investigate in a practical way the problem of sources for understanding and writing about American Indian history. As a senior capstone seminar, the final project is a substantial research paper. Enrollment limited to 20. P WRIT
    HIST 1970A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • American Legal History, 1760-1920

    Undergraduate seminar on the United States and international law. Focuses mainly on the period before the twentieth century. Examines subjects such as the right of revolution; the evolution of U.S. Constitution law; law as an instrument of economic development and exploitation; and the evolution of rights-consciousness—all within the context of international law. Enrollment limited to 20. Students should contact the instructor before the beginning of the semester if they are interested in taking the course. Instructor permission required. WRIT
    HIST 1972A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • Theory and Practice of Local History

    Examines the theory and practice of local history, evaluating examples from a variety of genres ranging through micro history to folk music, from genealogy to journalism. Work with primary documents, evidence from the built environment and visits to local historic sites and archives will enable students to evaluate sources and develop their own ideas about writing history and presenting it to a public audience. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required.
    HIST 1972E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lubar
  • Consent: Race, Sex, and the Law

    In the context of recent student organizing on college campuses, the word “consent” has become headline news. But what is “consent” and what does it have to do with the history of race and sexuality in America? In this course, we will use history, law, and feminist theory to understand the origins of consent, to trace its operation as a political category, and to uncover the many cultural meanings of “yes” and “no” across time. Themes addressed include: slavery, marriage, sex work, feminism, and violence, from the founding of American democracy to the present.
    HIST 1972F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
  • Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World

    This seminar is an experiment in thinking a global history of the making of the modern world. We read texts that track the movement of 
ideas, peoples and goods, the formation of political and economic inequalities and the continuous struggles of ordinary people against them. From empires to nation-states, from anti-imperialist nationalist struggles to transnational radical movements, this seminar grapples with the politics of knowledge for drawing out “fugitive” lineages of the past that we need to shape our collective future. No overrides will be given before the semester begins. Interested students must attend first class meeting.
    HIST 1974J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: Environmental Histories of Non-Human Actors

    More than other sub-fields of history, environmental history approaches non-human actors as agents in their own right. This forces a radical reconceptualization of the nature of the subject. What happens to our understanding of the past (and the stories we tell about the past) if we posit that mountains think, mosquitos speak, and dogs dream? Drawing on Science and Technology Studies, Thing Theory, and Animal Studies, this course examines such questions by decentering the human and elevating non-human actors within narratives of interactive networks. Short written assignments build on each other to culminate in a research project in environmental history.
    HIST 1976C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Environmental History of Latin America 1492-Present

    From the development of sugar as the major slave commodity of the 18th century Caribbean to the “Water Wars” in the Bolivian highlands at the turn of the 21st century, race, labor, and imperialism in Latin America have been shaped in relation to the natural environment. This course explores the role of the environment in the colonial and modern history of Latin America. Together, we will examine how the environment shaped the processes of conquest, displacement, settlement, and trade, as well as how these processes transformed the natural environment throughout the hemisphere. WRIT
    HIST 1976H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • Histories of the Future

    This course is for students interested in how ideas about what the future of human societies would look like have developed over time, and in the impact of those ideas on cultural, social and political norms. We will look carefully at examples of early modern prophecy before turning to the more recent emergence of theories of economic and social progress, plans for utopian communities, and markedly less optimistic and often dark visions of where we’re headed. We will also explore the roles capitalism, popular culture, and science have played in shaping the practices and vocabularies associated with imagining the future. WRIT
    HIST 1976R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Modern Southeast Asian History, 18th Century to Present: A Reading Seminar

    This reading seminar explores the history of modern Southeast Asia (the region comprising the contemporary nation-sates of Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam) from the 18th century to the present. Crossing both national and disciplinary boundaries, this seminar will engage students in discussions on European colonization, globally linked trade networks, migration and ethnic relations, material and visual culture, formation of nationalism, war and mass violence, gender and sexuality. Students will also be able to read on specific interests of their own, individually or in small groups.
    HIST 1978B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
  • Wise Latinas: Women, Gender, and Biography in Latinx History

    Last summer the Brown community reflected on Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor's autobiography that documents how her experience as a Bronx-raised Puerto Rican and “wise Latina” shaped her illustrious legal career. This course will provide historical context for reading Latinx biographies and locate them within a broader history of women, gender, and sexuality in Latinx histories of the United States. We will examine life histories, oral histories, and biographies. Units will explore the histories of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, and Central Americans, paying close attention to race and gender and highlighting struggles for social justice.
    HIST 1979E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amador
  • Sex, Gender, Empire

    Despite brutal violence at their core, European empires were imagined as families consisting of European colonials and their “native” subjects. We'll position sex, gender, family at the heart of the imperial enterprise, examining how boundaries of imperial territory were imagined in terms of a shared household. What a family was and who was part of it became a source of imperial debate which intersected with anxieties around racial mixing and sexuality. In turn, diverse formations of imperial families shaped questions of sex and gender in Europe pursuing this global history of inter-cultural relationships that continue to shape our present day. WRIT
    HIST 1979F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pant
  • The Unwinding: A History of the 1990s

    This course will carefully consider the history of a recent decade -- the 1990s. We will reflect on grand historical narratives -- the end of the Cold War, the two-term presidency of a centrist Democrat, and the large challenges faced by the United States at home and abroad. But we will also explore less conventional topics, including the effects of new technology, and the ways in which new media and new tactics reshaped a political consensus that had endured for decades. Finally, we will consider the decade's rich cultural expression, including its music, film, literature and journalism. WRIT
    HIST 1979G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
  • Prostitutes, Mothers, + Midwives: Women in Pre-modern Europe and North America

    Today’s society often contrasts stay-at-home moms with working women. How did women in Europe and North America navigate the domestic and public sphere from the late medieval period to the start of the twentieth century? How did gender affect occupational identity? Were women excluded from the professional class? This seminar investigates gender in the workplace, looks at gender-specific employment, and considers how families functioned. Readings include passages from classical, religious, and medical texts as an introduction to medieval gender roles. Students will explore texts, images, and film to understand pre-modern work and the women who did it.
  • Race and Inequality in Metropolitan America from Urbanization to #blacklivesmatter

    There is nothing natural about the state of race and inequality in American cities today. Urban inequities – around residential segregation; access to housing, schools, jobs; state violence – are overwhelmingly the result of decades of choices made by individuals and policymakers. This course will examine this history. We will trace how race has shaped metropolitan America from the late nineteenth century to present day. The course will explore how institutions, government policies, and individual practices developed and perpetuated race and class-based inequalities. We will also examine examples throughout this history of individuals who fought collectively for racial and economic justice. DPLL
    HIST 1979I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Holtzman
  • London: 1750 to the Present

    This course explores London’s emergence as a major European capital in the eighteenth century, its international pre-eminence in the nineteenth, its experiences of war in the twentieth century and its encounters with immigration, social change and urban discontent in the postwar period. We will focus on themes in the social and cultural life of London, including popular culture, poverty, urban space, crime, and street life. We will discuss how scholars have approached these histories and use contemporary sources—visual and material culture, court records, newspaper accounts, and literature—to explore the lives of Londoners of the past.
    HIST 1979J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Flinn
  • Jewish Humor and Commercial Entertainment in Early 20th-Century Europe and America (JUDS 1726)

  • Blacks + Jews in American History and Culture (JUDS 1753)

  • Undergraduate Reading Courses

    Guided reading on selected topics. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Lubar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Meisel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Prospective Thesis Writers

    Prospective honors students are encouraged to enroll in HIST 1992 during semesters 5 or 6. HIST 1992 offers a consideration of historical methodology and techniques of writing and research with the goal of preparing to write a senior thesis in history. The course helps students refine research skills, define a project, and prepare a thesis prospectus, which is required for admission to honors. Students who complete honors may count HIST 1992 as a concentration requirement. Limited to juniors who qualify for the honors program. WRIT
    HIST 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part I

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. All students admitted to the History Honors Program must enroll in HIST 1993 for two semesters of thesis research and writing. They may enroll in the course during semesters 6 and 7, or 7 and 8. Course work entails researching, organizing, writing a history honors thesis. Presentation of work and critique of peers' work required. Limited to seniors and juniors who have been admitted to History Honors Program. HIST 1993 is a mandatory S/NC course. See History Concentration Honors Requirements.
    HIST 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part II

    This is the second half of a year-long course, upon completion the grade will revert to HIST 1993. Prerequisite: HIST 1993. WRIT
    HIST 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    HIST 2890 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 2910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Steinberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S43
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Professionalization Seminar

    Required of all second year Ph.D. students.
    HIST 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Johnson
  • Prospectus Development Seminar

    This required course open only to second-year students in the History Ph.D. program focuses on the development of a dissertation prospectus. The seminar will include considering the process of choosing a dissertation topic, selecting a dissertation committee, identifying viable dissertation projects, articulating a project in the form of a prospectus, and developing research grant proposals based on the prosectus. E
    HIST 2960 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • Rethinking the Civil Rights Movement

    This graduate course encourages a rethinking of the complex components, arguments and activities that have characterized what we have come to know as the Civil Rights Movement, concentrating primarily on African American agency, actions and politics, through careful reading of recent scholarship in the field. While knowledge of U.S. history is preferred, this course asks larger thematic questions about protest movements (the role of the state, relationships with and between oppressed groups and organizations, and periodization), that will interest non-Americanists also. Some of the topics covered include: gender, organizing and strategies, the local, global ramifications and interactions, organizational structures and politics, and the recent concept of the Long Civil Rights Movement. M
    HIST 2970C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
  • Early Modern British History-Reading

    No description available.
    HIST 2970J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • Population Displacements and the Making of the Modern World

    Forced population displacements have long been an engine for the formation of the modern world as well as for producing modern knowledge regimes about that world. This course explores the histories, ecologies, and subjectivities of displacement from the colonial conquest of the Americas and the slave trade, through industrialization and rise of nation states to the massive dislocations of the 20th century and the era of climate change. It also interrogates the epistemological erasures that render certain forms of displacement invisible. This course features guest speakers and participation in the workshops and conference of Mellon Sawyer Seminar on displacement.
    HIST 2971U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • The Politics of Knowledge

    The seminar offers an introduction to fundamental theoretical texts and exemplary works in the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies. Readings will be drawn from a range of time periods and geographical areas, and students will be asked to deploy the theoretical insights of our readings in working with sources in their own fields for a final research paper. Topics include: the gendered dimensions of knowledge, the moral economy of science, claims to expertise, and the stakes of "objectivity."
    HIST 2981F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • Moral Panic and the Politics of Fear

    What are the political uses and content of fear? This course traces the politics of panic as a window onto state, stigma, and society by pairing foundational readings in culture studies with historical monographs grounded in case studies. Over the course of the semester, we will consider such themes as: the mobilization of fear as a strategy of governance; sexuality, sickness, and disgust; the political logic of backlash; racial terror and colonialism; paranoia and conspiracy theories; popular culture and elite repression and appropriation; and the supernatural inflection of fear politics.
    HIST 2981N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    HIST 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep