Courses for Fall 2016

  • Locked Up: A Global History of Prison and Captivity

    A long history lies behind the millions of men and women locked up today as prisoners, captives and hostages. Beginning in antiquity and ending in the present, this course draws on materials from a variety of cultures across the world to explore incarceration's centuries-old past. In examining the experience and meaning of imprisonment, whether as judicial punishment, political repression, or the fallout of war, the class will ask fundamental questions about liberty as well. History 150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation and argumentation. This course presumes no previous history courses.
    HIST 0150C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • Clash of Empires in Latin America

    Examines Latin America as the scene of international rivalry from the 16th to the 19th century. Topics include comparative colonization, the transatlantic slave trade, privateering and piracy in the Caribbean, and the creation of an "Atlantic world." P
    HIST 0232 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Understanding the Middle East: 1800s to the Present

    This course is an introduction to the history of the modern Middle East from the mid-19th C to the present. Readings and topics are structured chronologically, and emphasize the key events and turning points in the political and economic history of the region. The goal of the course is to understand how the Middle East, as it is today, has been shaped by the events of the past.
    HIST 0244 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mitter
  • Religion, Politics, and Culture in America, 1865 - Present

    Religion has played an undeniable role in the contemporary American cultural landscape. This course lends some perspective on the present by investigating the various and, at times, surprising role religion has played in history in the shaping of American culture from 1865 to the present. WRIT
    HIST 0253 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • A Global History of the Atomic Age

    We live in the atomic age. From 1945 to the foreseeable future, atomic weapons and nuclear energy have had (and will continue to have) a tremendous effect on global politics, the environment, and everyday life around the world. This course introduces students to three themes in this broader history: first, we examine the origins of nuclear proliferation and the global arms race; second, we explore cultural responses to the atomic age; third, we juxtapose the excitement over the unlimited promise of nuclear energy with the slow catastrophes that accompanied weapons development, the nuclear industry, and waste storage.
    HIST 0276 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • Shanghai in Myth and History

    “Fishing village”, “Paris of the East”, or “a waking dream where everything I could already imagine had been taken to its extreme?” In an iconic role, Marlene Dietrich bragged that “it took more than one man to change my name to Shanghai Lily,” but the local song “Shanghai by Night” retorted, “To look at her/Smiling face/Who would know that she’s troubled inside?” We will examine why Shanghai has gripped the imaginations of so many, placing the material history of the city alongside dream and image, focusing on the four topics of colonialism, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and class. FYS
    HIST 0510A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Popular Culture in Latin America and the Caribbean

    From tango to plastic surgery, Donald Duck to reggaeton, this course places popular culture at the center of modern Latin American and Caribbean history. How, we will ask, did popular culture reflect and shape struggles over national belonging? How did foreign cultural products come to bear on international relations and transnational flows? In what contexts has culture served as a vehicle of resistance to dominant ideologies and systems of power? Far from a mere "diversion," popular culture instead offers a compelling lens onto the relationship between state and society in Latin America and beyond. WRIT FYS
    HIST 0537A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • Object Histories: The Material Culture of Early America

    History is not just about people; it is also about things! Come explore the world of early America through the lens of objects--boats, dresses, plows, houses, wagons, watches, silver cups, wigs, blankets, land, gardens, hammers, desks--and the cultures that produced and consumed them. As a first year seminar, this course is designed to engagingly introduce students to the basic concepts of historical study. We will take several field trips to local historical sites, both on and off campus. Our primary focus will be specific objects and their contexts and histories. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT P
    HIST 0550A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • Abraham Lincoln: Historical and Cultural Perspectives

    This seminar uses life, legacy, myth of Abraham Lincoln to explore central themes such as frontier in early republic, nature of political leadership, law/legal culture, and emergence of sectionalism, slavery, antislavery, Civil War. Frequent short writing assignments and research investigations allow students in-depth explorations of Lincoln’s works, the writings of his contemporaries, and modern non-fiction, fiction, and film. The course enables us to consider two larger themes: 1) the relationship between memory and history; and 2) the function of history in modern society. The course has no prerequisites and does not presuppose special knowledge of American history. WRIT FYS
    HIST 0551A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • Robber Barons

    Today, the United States looks a lot like it did at the turn of the 20th century. Much like it is now, America's economy at that time saw tremendous growth interrupted by periodic financial crises. Moreover, both are periods of immense inequality. Whereas we have the one per cent, the late 19th century witnessed a small group of capitalists amass unprecedented fortunes, which provided immense political power. In this class, we will explore what the lives of these “robber barons” can tell us about the role of economic privilege in shaping America’s social, cultural, and political history. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0555B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • Sport in American History

    This course covers the relationship of sports to aspects of American culture since 1900. Topics include gender, race, amateurism, professionalism, intercollegiate athletics, and sports heroes. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT
    HIST 0556A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • Slavery, Race, and Racism

    This seminar will address the history of race and racism as it relates to the history of slavery in America. We will trace the emergence of slavery in the New World, with a heavy emphasis on slavery in the U.S. South. The course is broad in scope, beginning with the emergence of the slave trade and concluding with a look forward to the ways that the history of slavery continues to impact the way race structures our lives today. In short, this course provides an introduction to slavery studies and to the history of race in America. FYS DPLL WRIT
    HIST 0557B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
  • Asian Americans and Third World Solidarity

    As historian Vijay Prashad puts it, “The Third World was not a place. It was a project.” During the 20th century struggles against colonialism, the peoples of Africa, Asia, and Latin America believed that another world was possible. Here, too, in the United States, minorities and their allies dreamed of dignity, democracy, and justice. Looking through the experiences of Asian Americans, this course examines the domestic freedom movements in the context of global decolonization. Topics include: campus activism, immigration, capitalist labor regimes, neocolonalism, cultural hegemony, and Afro-Asian connections. FYS DPLL
    HIST 0559B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • The Age of Revolutions, 1760-1824

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, the Americas belonged to a handful of European monarchies; within a few decades, most of the Americas was composed of independent republics, some of the European monarchs were either deposed or quaking on their thrones. Usually considered separately, revolutions in British North America, France, Saint-Domingue (Haiti) and Spanish America had diverse local circumstances yet composed a single cycle of intellectual ferment, imperial reform, accelerating violence and, forging of new political communities. We will examine revolutions that helped create the world we live in. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT P
    HIST 0580M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • American Patriotism in Black and White

    This course explores the different and sometimes conflicting definitions and meanings of patriotism and citizenship through the lens of African American history and military participation, using primary and secondary sources from the colonial period to the present, including political and legal documents, letters to editors, literary pieces, plays, speeches, and petitions. What are the many definitions of freedom and patriotism, and how have black people understood their realities as they chose to serve militarily? This social and political (not military) history focuses on the political implications of African Americans’ military service for/to the nation over three centuries. DPLL SOPH
    HIST 0654B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
  • Difficult Relations? Judaism and Christianity from the Middle Ages until the Present (JUDS 0050M)

  • The Campus on Fire: American Colleges and Universities in the 1960's (EDUC 0400)

  • Imperial China/China: Culture and Legacy

    As the current revival of Confucianism in the People’s Republic of China demonstrates, the past is still very much alive in China today. This lecture-and-discussion course surveys the history of China from the origins of the first state through the twilight of the imperial period in the nineteenth century. Lectures are designed and the reading assignments chosen to emphasize in particular those ideas and beliefs, institutions and government structures, and literary and artistic developments that have shaped (and continue to shape) China today. “Imperial China” provides the knowledge necessary for informed study of modern China.
    HIST 1110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
  • The Modern Chinese Nation: An Idea and Its Limits

    How did the Chinese empire become a nation-state? This question drives a survey of the history of China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Chinese societies overseas from 1895 to the present. We will explore a variety of conceptions of the Chinese nation and the rise of new state formations, investigating the extent to which they shaped the way people experienced everyday life. We will also pay attention to those who have been excluded by or unwillingly drafted into these processes, or who live outside them altogether, looking at other ways society has been organized and culture defined.
    HIST 1121 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Samurai and Merchants, Prostitutes and Priests: Japanese Urban Culture in the Early Modern Period

    Examines the cultural traditions of the urban samurai, the wealthy merchant, and the plebian artisan that emerged in the great metropolises of Edo, Osaka, and Kyoto during the early modern period. Focuses on the efforts of the government to mold certain kinds of cultural development for its own purposes and the efforts of various social groups to redirect those efforts to suit their desires and self-interest. WRIT P
    HIST 1140 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • The Search for Renewal in 20th century Europe

    The overarching theme of the course is the relationship between modernity and the primitive as manifested in major cultural, aesthetic and political movements in the 20th century. Films are an integral part of the course. WRIT
    HIST 1230C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Modern European Women + Gender History

    This course deals with the history of European women and gender from the Enlightenment to the present. It will focus on large historical themes and questions, especially shifting constructions of femininity and masculinity. It will begin with an analysis of eighteenth-century philosophies regarding women and gender, and it will move to examinations of specific topics such as industrialization, Victorian femininity, the suffrage movements, gender and the Great War, interwar sexuality, fascism, gender and the Second World War, and the sexual revolution.
    HIST 1235A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • English History, 1529-1660

    Examines politics, religion, and society from the Protestant Reformation to the Puritan Revolution-a period of rapid and dramatic change when the world, for most English people, was turned upside down. Considers the experiences and concerns of ordinary men and women, as well as the elite. Takes in Scotland, Ireland, and the great migration to New England. P WRIT
    HIST 1266C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • The French Revolution

    This course aims to provide a basic factual knowledge of the French Revolution, an understanding of the major historiographic debates about the revolutionary period, and a sense of the worldwide impact of events occurring in late-eighteenth century France. A strong historiographic focus will direct our attention to the gendered nature of the revolutionary project; the tension between liberty and equality that runs throughout French history; the intersection of race and citizenship in the Revolution; and the plausibility of competing social, political, and cultural interpretations of the Revolution. DPLL
    HIST 1272D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Revill
  • Rebel Island: Cuba, 1492-Present

    Cuba, once the jewel in the Spanish imperial crown, has been home to some of the world's most radical revolutions and violent retrenchments. For two centuries, its influence has spread well beyond its borders, igniting the passion of nationalists and internationalists as well as the wrath of imperial aggression. This course traces the history of Cuba from its colonial origins through the present, foregrounding the revolutionary imaginary that has sustained popular action-from anti-slavery rebellions through the Cuban Revolution and its discontents-in addition to the historical processes that have forged one of the world's most vibrant socio-cultural traditions.
    HIST 1320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • The Mexican Revolution

    An in-depth study of the Mexican Revolution. The focus is on the years of revolutionary violence (1910-1920), but considerable attention is also paid to the roots of the Revolution and to its socioeconomic and political impact in the period 1920-1940.
    HIST 1333 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
  • Latin American History and Film: Memory, Narrative and Nation

    This course provides an introduction to cinematic interpretations of Latin American history. Together we will explore how (and why) filmmakers have used motion pictures to tell particular narratives about the Latin American past. We will critically examine a broad range of films dealing with historical questions, and explore what these films have to say about how gender and sexuality, imperialism, slavery, the church, revolution and repression shaped the history of the region. In order to explore these topics we will examine films in relation to academic, autobiographical, and popular texts, all of which provide different ways of representing the past.
    HIST 1381 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • The American Revolution

    This course will explore the period of the American Revolution from the 1760s through the turn of the nineteenth century. Taking a broad view of the conflict and its consequences, we will situate the American colonies in their North American and Atlantic context, examine the material and ideological concerns that prompted the Revolutionary War, and trace the consequences of the conflict for the nation that followed. Students will be invited to look beyond the Founders to the experiences of women, slaves, Native Americans, common soldiers, and Loyalists.
    HIST 1501 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Campbell
  • American Politics and Culture Since 1945

    This course explores the history of the United States between the end of World War II and the present. Major themes and topics include WWII; the rise and decline of New Deal liberalism; the Cold War and anti-communism; mass consumption; race, civil rights and liberation movements; women’s rights and feminism; the New Right; Vietnam and foreign policy; the service economy; immigration; and neoliberalism.
    HIST 1507 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Holtzman
  • American Urban History, 1600-1870

    Both a survey covering urbanization in America from colonial times to the present, and a specialized focus exploring American history from an urban frame of reference. Examines the premodern, "walking" city from 1600-1870. Includes such topics as cities in the Revolution and Civil War, the development of urban services, westward expansion, and social structure. P
    HIST 1550 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • Empires in America to 1890

    This course surveys the development of American foreign relations from initial encounters between Native Americans and newly arrived Europeans to the extension of EuroAmerican power beyond the continental United States. By being attentive to a wider global context, we will attempt to understand the trajectory of "America" from a colonial hinterland to dominant world power. DPLL WRIT
    HIST 1553 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • Nature on Display

    This course will explore the different ways in which people have represented the natural world in a variety of context and time periods from the 16th to the 21st century. We will look at the depiction of nature in museums, gardens, documentary films, and municipal parks, as well as the science of biology and ecology. As we do so, we will explore our changing attitudes towards nature and the place that we occupy in it, thinking through the complex and philosophically fraught question of what nature is, and what, if anything, distinguishes it from the rest of our world. WRIT
    HIST 1820G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • Science, Medicine and Technology in the 17th Century

    This course examines the development of science and related fields in the period sometimes called 'the scientific revolution'. It will both introduce the student to what happened, and ask some questions about causes and effects. The new science is often associated with figures like Harvey, Galileo, Descartes, Boyle, Leeuwenhoek, and Newton. But it is also associated with new ways of assessing nature that are mingled with commerce. The question of the relationship between developments in Europe and elsewhere is therefore also explored. P
    HIST 1825H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • The Roots of Modern Science

    This course explores the ways theories of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics grew in relation to the natural, cultural and social worlds of the 18th and 19th centuries. There are no formal pre-requisites for the course, which is designed to be equally open and accessible to science and humanities students. WRIT
    HIST 1825L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
  • Academic Freedom on Trial: A Century of Campus Controversies (EDUC 1740)

  • Word, Image and Power in Renaissance Italy (ITAL 1580)

  • Slavery in the Ancient World (CLAS 1120E)

  • Medicine and Public Health in Africa

    This course explores the major debates in the history of medicine in Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and highlights the coexistence of a variety of healing traditions and medical understandings across the continent. It will focus on the following questions: What are some of the ways Africans practice and understand medicine? How have these practices interacted with other medical systems? What impact did colonialism have on the production of medical knowledge? How were practices and treatments evaluated and deemed effective? By whom and on what grounds? And how have independent African states addressed these critical issues?
    HIST 1960Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Johnson
  • Knowledge and Power: China's Examination Hell

    For centuries a rigorous series of examinations requiring deep knowledge of the Confucian Classics was the primary tool for the selection of government officials in imperial China. This system has been variously celebrated as a tool of meritocracy and excoriated as the intellectual “straightjacket” that impeded China’s entry into the modern world. This seminar examines the system and the profound impact it had, for better or worse, on Chinese society and government in the early modern period, and the role that its successor “examination hell”—the gaokao or university entrance examination—plays in society today.
    HIST 1961C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
  • North Korea: Past, Present, Future

    Typically, the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK) is portrayed as a rogue nation ruled by the Kim family, autocrats who are either “mad” or “bad” and whose policies have traumatized the country’s citizens, wrecked the economy, and threatened nuclear disaster on South Korea, East Asia, even the USA. This course moves beyond such stereotypes to examine the interconnected political, economic, and cultural transformations of the DPRK from 1945 to the present. Also included are the lived experiences of the Korean people, the plight of refugees, and the question of unification with South Korea. WRIT
    HIST 1961I S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • Spin, Terror and Revolution: England, Scotland and Ireland, 1660-1720

    Examines the revolutionary upheavals in England, Scotland and Ireland of the later 17th-century through a close examination of primary source materials. Topics covered include: high and low politics, the rise of the public sphere, the politics of sexual scandal, government spin, persecution and toleration, and the revolutions of 1688-91 and their aftermaths. Enrollment limited to 20. P WRIT
    HIST 1964G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • City as Modernity:Popular Culture, Mass Consumption, Urban Entertainment in Nineteenth-Century Paris

    Modernity as a distinct kind of cultural experience was first articulated in the Paris of the 1850s. The seminar will explore the meaning of this concept by looking at the theories of Walter Benjamin, as well as historical examples of popular urban culture such as the mass circulation newspaper, the department store, the museum, the café concert and the early cinema. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT
    HIST 1965A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Appetite for Greatness: Cuisine, Power, and the French

    France has long been synonymous with a delicious cuisine, one with no equal in the world. This seminar will examine the development of French cuisine as a tool for national greatness, beginning with its origins under the Sun King, Louis XIV. We will trace subjects such as the global dissemination of French food after the French Revolution, the food shortages common to French people as the country industrialized, and the feeling that France was losing its culinary hold in the twentieth century. Today, French food again serves as a nexus for the anxieties of the nation, including Americanization and immigration.
    HIST 1965L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • Anti-Semitism, Anti-Judaism, Anti-Zionism: Historical Connections and Disconnections

    Today, these terms are frequently used in political discourse and propaganda without any clear sense of their individual meanings and the complex relationships between them. This seminar will analyze the development of each against its specific historical background, as well as its interactions with the other two in different historical settings. Among the topics to be discussed: traditional religious anti-Judaism, the enlightenment exclusion of Jews, the rise of political anti-Semitism, Zionism and anti-Zionism in Jewish and Christian culture, racial anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, anti-Zionism in the postwar Soviet bloc, Vatican II, and the development of contemporary anti-Zionism.
    HIST 1965Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • Politics and Culture Under The Brazilian Military Dictatorship, 1964-1985

    This course will focus on the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place in Brazil during the military dictatorship that ruled the country from 1964-85. We will examine why the generals took power, the role of the U.S. government in backing the new regime, cultural transformations during this period, and the process that led to re-democratization.
    HIST 1967L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • History of the Andes from the Incas to Evo Morales

    Before the Spanish invaded in the 1530s, western South America was the scene of the largest state the New World had ever known, Tawantinsuyu, the Inca empire. During almost 300 years of colonial rule, the Andean provinces were shared by the "Republic of Spaniards" and the "Republic of Indians" - two separate societies, one dominating and exploiting the other. Today the region remains in many ways colonial, as Quechua- and Aymara-speaking villagers face a Spanish-speaking state, as well as an ever-more-integrated world market, the pressures of neoliberal reform from international banks, and the melting of the Andean glaciers. WRIT
    HIST 1967T S02
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • Approaches to The Middle East

    This seminar introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Middle East Studies in the broader context of the history of area studies in the humanities and social sciences. Why and when did the Middle East become an area of study? What are the approaches and topics that have shaped the development of this field? And what are the political implications of contending visions for its future? The readings sample canonical and alternative works and the classes feature visits by leading scholars who research and write on this region. WRIT
    HIST 1968 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • Israel-Palestine: Lands and Peoples I

    This advanced undergraduate seminar seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the links between the region now known as Israel and Palestine and the peoples that have inhabited it or have made it into part of their mental, mythical. and religious landscape throughout history. The course will be interdisciplinary at its very core, engaging the perspectives of historians, geologists, geographers, sociologists, scholars of religion and the arts, politics and media. At the very heart of the seminar is the question: What makes for the bond between groups and place - real or imagined, tangible or ephemeral. No prerequisites required. WRIT
    HIST 1969A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • Powering the Past: The History of Energy

    This seminar will explore the role of energy in shaping our past, and uses energy consumption and production as an entry into central questions in environmental history. Beginning with the regimes of wood, water, and muscle in early human history, the course moves on to explore fossil fuels, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources around the world. While attentive to issues of environmental impact, we will also examine the broader implications of energy use for social, economic, and political developments and challenges. Readings are drawn from anthropology, geography, ecology as well as history. This course presumes no previous history courses.
    HIST 1976D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Demuth
  • The Indian Ocean World

    Oceans cover two-thirds of the surface of the earth. They are the world’s great connectors. Rather than political boundaries of empire and nation-state, this course focuses on an enduring geography of water as the central shaper of history. Drawing together the history of three continents this course explores the Indian Ocean world as a major arena of political, economic and cultural contact during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. As we map the contours of this history we study how race, gender and sexuality were shaped across the Indian Ocean. Major topics include Islam, imperialism, indentured labor migration, liberalism and anti-colonialism. HISTGlobal
    HIST 1979K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pant
  • Urban History of Latin America

    Latin America is the world’s most urbanized region. 80 percent of Latin Americans live in cities, and iconic cities such as São Paulo and Mexico City are among the world's largest conurbations. The city has long played a key role in the region's history, serving as nodes of imperial power, as religious centers, and as markets from pre-Columbian to colonial times. The 20th century witnessed both the achievement and failure of modernization, as cities industrialized rapidly but grew haphazardly, struggling with poverty and pollution. Today, Latin American cities are multifaceted spaces where both real advancement and daunting problems coexist.
    HIST 1979L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vergara
  • Feathery Things: An Avian Introduction to Animal Studies (HMAN 1972F)

  • The Anthropocene: The Past and Present of Environmental Change (ENVS 1910)

  • Intellectual Change: From Ottoman Modernization to the Turkish Republic (MES 1300)

  • Undergraduate Reading Courses

    Guided reading on selected topics. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Lubar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Prospective Thesis Writers

    Prospective honors students are encouraged to enroll in HIST 1992 during semesters 5 or 6. HIST 1992 offers a consideration of historical methodology and techniques of writing and research with the goal of preparing to write a senior thesis in history. The course helps students refine research skills, define a project, and prepare a thesis prospectus, which is required for admission to honors. Students who complete honors may count HIST 1992 as a concentration requirement. Limited to juniors who qualify for the honors program. WRIT
    HIST 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part I

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. All students admitted to the History Honors Program must enroll in HIST 1993 for two semesters of thesis research and writing. They may enroll in the course during semesters 6 and 7, or 7 and 8. Course work entails researching, organizing, writing a history honors thesis. Presentation of work and critique of peers' work required. Limited to seniors and juniors who have been admitted to History Honors Program. HIST 1993 is a mandatory S/NC course. See History Concentration Honors Requirements.
    HIST 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part II

    This is the second half of a year-long course, upon completion the grade will revert to HIST 1993. Prerequisite: HIST 1993. WRIT
    HIST 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    HIST 2890 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 2910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Steinberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S43
    Primary Instructor
    Owens
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Colloquium

    Required of all first-year graduate students; includes participation in Thursday Lecture Series. E
    HIST 2930 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Historical Crossings: Empires and Modernity

    “Historical crossings” is a rough translation of histoire croisée, referring to global configurations of events and a shared history, rather than to a traditional comparative history. This Seminar is designed to be the cornerstone of the M.A. program. It will not serve as a traditional historical methods course but instead focus on training students to read and think on various scales of historical analysis—from cross-cultural and trans-geographic to the granularity of social and cultural specificity, requiring students to think both globally and locally and introducing them to an advanced level of historical inquiry, debate, and exploration.
    HIST 2935 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • Writing Workshop

    Required of all 3rd semester Ph.D. students.
    HIST 2940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Core Readings in 20th Century United States History

    Major topics and themes in 20th-century U.S. history. M
    HIST 2970Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • New Perspectives on Medieval History

    No description available.
    HIST 2971I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • Colonial Latin America

    This seminar focuses on the historiography of colonial Latin America since the 1960s. We will examine how this historiography has been influenced by broader trends in the discipline, such as the "cultural turn," and by internal develpments, notably the increasing emphasis on native-language sources. We will pay particular attemtion to more recent interpretations of both traditional subjects (conquest, evangelization, the frontier) and emerging approaches (environmental history, ethnogenesis). Requirements include short essays and a literature review.
    HIST 2971T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Theory From The South

    The “global south” is a working category today for a diversity of intellectual projects centered on the non-European postcolonial world. While this category is embedded in histories of empire and culture, critical thinking since the 1970s has already done much to “provincialize Europe” and interrogate the ways in which power and knowledge have been imbricated in the making of universal claims, institutional processes and historical self-understanding. This graduate seminar will draw upon lineages of anti-colonial thought and postcolonial critique to relocate and rethink the "south" as a generative source for theory and history.
    HIST 2981I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    HIST 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep