Courses for Spring 2020

A complete list of courses offered by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, including full descriptions and cross-listings, is available via Courses @ Brown.

  • Simulating Reality: The (Curious) History and Science of Immersive Experiences (CLPS 0540)

  • Heritage in the Metropolis: Remembering and Preserving the Urban Past (ARCH 0317)

  • Introduction to Indigenous Politics with Pacific Islander Focus (POLS 0920B)

  • The Cogut Institute for the Humanities Research Seminar

    This seminar involves reading and discussing in-progress research by the annual fellows of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, an interdisciplinary group of faculty, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and undergraduates engaged in extended research on a major project or honors thesis. Students read a wide range of works-in-progress, prepare questions and participate in seminar discussions, intervene as first questioners for specific sessions assigned to them in advance, and present their own work twice during the year. Admission to the course requires that students have received the Cogut Institute Undergraduate Fellowship for the year in which they enroll.
    HMAN 1000B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • Introduction to iPhone/iPad Moviemaking Using 3-D and 360 VR Comparisons

    Mobile Devices are democratizing movie-making by lowering barriers to entry, enabling students to become full-fledged members of the film industry virtually overnight. This pioneering course provides the basic tools for students to create and distribute no- and low-budget live-action motion pictures with professional production values utilizing only their personal smartphones. Students will acquire the skills to plan, capture and edit short motion pictures through hands-on instruction and experimentation with low-cost accessories, including selfie-sticks, lens adapters, directional microphones and iPhone apps like Filmic Pro, Vizzywig and iMovie. Limited to junior, senior and graduate students.
    HMAN 1971S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bogosian
  • Governing Culture: Music and the Arts in Political Life

    The social function and governmental regulation of aesthetic life play a key role in the constitution of political regimes. This course examines debates on the arts as instruments of power, distinction, resistance, contestation, and revolution, from the early modern period to the present. The government of music, sound, noise, and silence will offer a point of comparison among absolutist monarchies, modern republics, totalitarian regimes, liberal democracies, and colonial empires. In addition to music, the course draws from political sources, theoretical works, literature, and the visual arts.
    HMAN 1974K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mahiet
  • The Coming Apocalypse: Between the Earth and the World

    A cascading catastrophe threatens to turn the earth uninhabitable and bring our world to its end. How to think, in this context, the relation between our world, the world, and the earth? Are they known, experienced, shared with others, or being destroyed in the same way? How have their difference and convergence been affected by globalization, and affect our understanding of "the Anthropocene"? Following environmental news, the seminar addresses these and related questions through literary, theoretical, and philosophical texts, including works by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Arendt, Derrida, Nancy, Latour, Haraway, Povinelli, Coates, and Mbembe.
    HMAN 1974L S01
    Graduate students can register under HMAN 2971G.
    Primary Instructor
    Ophir
  • Solidarities: Sharing Freedom, Inventing Futures

    Solidarity between people—even between species—has never been more needed. But our culture is saturated by personality politics and ubiquitous narcissism. How can we think and organize ourselves out of this impasse? Is it shared interests or shared identities that unite us? What does freedom mean in an interconnected age? These are some of the questions that any attempt to think through the question of solidarity in the twenty-first century must encounter. Writers to consider include Marx, Arendt, Foucault, Simondon, Negri, Stuart Hall, Maurizio Lazzarato, Donna Haraway, Couze Venn, and Ruth Ozeki, among others.
    HMAN 1974M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gilbert
  • Narrating the Borderlands: Literature, Legality, and Solidarity (HISP 1371F)

  • Print and Power in Modern Southeast Asia (HIST 1962E)

  • Independent Study

    HMAN 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ophir
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Imagining Cities: Early Modern Urban Perspectives

    Every city is a palimpsest in space and time. Calvino’s “Invisible Cities” of reputation and imagination and Miéville’s double-awareness in “The City and the City” provide points of entry to visualizations and narrations of real and imagined urban centers. This course considers cities as varied as Rome, Seville, Mexico City, and the City of God in literature, political and architectural treatises, maps, images, and archaeological and historical records. This multidisciplinary archive forms a basis for collaborations in recovering and reconstructing built environments from different perspectives in text, image, and digital media, working with original materials in special collections.
    HMAN 2400T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lincoln
  • Italian Thought: Inside and Out

    This collaborative seminar provides an introduction into what is called “Italian Thought” (Agamben, Cacciari, Cavarero, Esposito, Federici, Fortunati, Gramsci, Muraro, Negri, Rovatti, Tronti, Vattimo). It offers close readings of texts considered as classics of “Italian Thought” (the “Inside” of our title) and also seeks to include and make functional other languages excluded from this discourse (the “Out” of our title: feminism, queer theory, psychoanalysis). Students will engage with the Pembroke Center Archive and collaborate on translation and glossary projects.
    HMAN 2400U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart-Steinberg
  • The Visual Frequency of Black Life

    How does one represent black life? Historical and contemporary black photo books offer densely layered accounts of blackness and black sociality that, far from restricted to the visual, are haptic and sonic engagements and improvisations. Placing these works in conversation with sonic scripts, embodied performances, and moving images inspired by and in dialogue with them, we will unpack multiple visual frequencies of black life with an eye toward understanding practices of black refusal and futurity that structure their varied creative practices. This collaborative seminar is taught in parallel by Tina Campt at Brown University and Saidiya Hartman at Columbia University.
    HMAN 2400W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Campt
    HMAN 2400W F01
    Primary Instructor
    Campt
    Schedule Code
    F: Filming/Screening
  • Premodern Art-Science, or the Work of Knowing in Europe before 1800

    This collaborative seminar examines premodern ways of knowing through entangled histories of art, craft, science, and medicine in Europe before 1800. Whether through the visual representations of naturalists or the manipulation of matter by artists/artisans to render nature meaningful, useful, or both, premoderns made knowledge in ways that defy modern disciplinary divisions. In studying premodern knowledge work through its own disciplinary understandings, we explore the research methodology of reconstruction, i.e., the argument that we must reconnect material objects with texts, and both with laboratory research practices, to fully understand premodern knowledge work. Taught in parallel at the University of Minnesota.
    HMAN 2400X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • Project Development Workshop

    In this capstone course, students completing the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities pursue individual or collaborative projects, such as a dissertation prospectus, a dissertation chapter, or a methodological/theoretical exercise relating to their field of interest. Weekly sessions are devoted to work-in-progress and discussion of key texts addressing method and theory in and beyond the humanities. At the end of the semester, participants present in a Collaborative Public Workshop. Admission to the seminar requires a formal application process and the completion of two HMAN 2400 seminars. This seminar is the capstone course for the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities.
    Information: https://www.brown.edu/academics/humanities/
    HMAN 2500 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
  • The Coming Apocalypse: Between the Earth and the World

    A cascading catastrophe threatens to turn the earth uninhabitable and bring our world to its end. How to think, in this context, the relation between our world, the world, and the earth? Are they known, experienced, shared with others, or being destroyed in the same way? How have their difference and convergence been affected by globalization, and affect our understanding of “the Anthropocene”? Following environmental news, the seminar addresses these and related questions through literary, theoretical, and philosophical texts, including works by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Arendt, Derrida, Nancy, Latour, Haraway, Povinelli, Coates, and Mbembe. Open to juniors and seniors with instructor permission.
    HMAN 2971G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ophir
  • Solidarities: Sharing Freedom, Inventing Futures

    Solidarity between people—even between species—has never been more needed. But our culture is saturated by personality politics and ubiquitous narcissism. How can we think and organize ourselves out of this impasse? Is it shared interests or shared identities that unite us? What does freedom mean in an interconnected age? These are some of the questions that any attempt to think through the question of solidarity in the twenty-first century must encounter. Writers to consider include Marx, Arendt, Foucault, Simondon, Negri, Stuart Hall, Maurizio Lazzarato, Donna Haraway, Couze Venn, and Ruth Ozeki, among others. Open to juniors and seniors with instructor permission.
    HMAN 2971H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gilbert