Upcoming Events

  • The US-Mexico border and divided opinions about immigration have become a matter of acute national controversy, but buried far beneath these concerns is a centuries-long tie between the United States and the wider Hispanic world, reaching back to a time well before the arrival of the Mayflower in 1620. This talk will outline that history, discussing the early attempts by the Spanish to place settlements in Florida in the 16th century and further efforts to extend Spain’s empire northward — until the early 19th century, when the wars for independence brought this era to an end. At the same time, this paper will situate these events in the context of the development of the United States, in order to consider the place of this largely forgotten early history in the larger vista of contemporary national memory.

    Carrie Gibson received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 2011, focusing on the Hispanic Caribbean in the era of the Haitian Revolution. Her latest work, El Norte: The Epic and Forgotten Story of Hispanic North America, was published in February 2019. She is also the author of Empire’s Crossroads: A History of the Caribbean from Columbus to the Present Day (Pan Macmillan, 2014). Before embarking on a career as a historian, Gibson was a journalist for the Guardian and Observer, and continues to contribute to media outlets. She was born and raised in the U.S., but has lived in London for more than two decades.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World , is free and open to the public.

    On 9/26, Carrie Gibson will participate in a book signing preceded by an informal talk for the general public at Books on the Square. Read more .

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • The U.S.-Mexico border and divided opinions about immigration have become a matter of acute national controversy, but buried far beneath these concerns is a centuries-long tie between the United States and the wider Hispanic world, reaching back to a time well before the arrival of the Mayflower in 1620. 

    Carrie Gibson received her Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 2011, focusing on the Hispanic Caribbean in the era of the Haitian Revolution. Her latest work, El Norte: The Epic and Forgotten Story of Hispanic North America, was published in February 2019. She is also the author of Empire’s Crossroads: A History of the Caribbean from Columbus to the Present Day (Pan Macmillan, 2014). Before embarking on a career as a historian, Gibson was a journalist for the Guardian and Observer, and continues to contribute to media outlets. She was born and raised in the U.S., but has lived in London for more than two decades.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World , is free and open to the public.

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • Theatre Without Borders/Théâtre sans frontières
    Translating, Circulating and Performing Early-Modern Drama

    The conference explores the work of Corneille in the context of European theatre and the circulation of early modern drama through both translation and performance, from the 17th to the 20th century.

    Friday, September 27, 2019
    Conveners: Karen Newman, Owen F. Walker ’33 Professor of Humanities, and Lewis Seifert, Professor of French Studies
    9:00 AM – 9:30 AM Coffee and Pastries
    9:30 AM – 9:45 AM Welcome
    9:45 AM – 10:45 AM Jennifer Row (University of Minnesota) • Corneille’s Queer Temporalities
    10:45AM – 11:45 AM Christian Biet (Université Paris Nanterre) • La Place Royale, ou l’urbanisme moderne : les lieux de la nouvelle comédie
    11:45 AM – 12:00 PM Break
    12:00 PM – 1:00 PM Katherine Ibbett (Trinity College, Oxford) • Andromaque in Translation: Foreignness and Refuge
    1:00 PM – 2:30 PM Lunch
    2:30 PM – 3:30 PM François Lecercle (Université de Paris-Sorbonne) • Corneille’s Comedies and the Rise of Theatrophobia
    3:30 PM – 4:00 PM Coffee Break
    4:00 PM – 5:00 PM Michael Moon (Emory University) • Corneille, Racine, Molière, and New York Queer Theater in the 1960s and After
    5:00 PM – 6:00 PM Reception

    The event is free and open to the public.

    This conference  is presented by the French Center of Excellence and the Department of Comparative Literature and co-sponsored by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, the Department of French Studies, and the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World.

    Center of Excellence, Conference, Humanities
  • This special seminar with Claudia Rankine is for undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event. Event location will be determined.

    This event is presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Oct
    2
    5:30pm - 7:30pm

    Claudia Rankine • “The Creative Imagination and Race”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Lecture and Book Signing

    Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely; two plays, The White Card, which premiered in February 2018 (ArtsEmerson/American Repertory Theater), and Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue; as well as numerous video collaborations. Her next publication, Just Us, is a collection of essays forthcoming with Graywolf Press in 2020. She is also the editor of several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. In 2016, she co-founded The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII). Rankine is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize, and a National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, United States Artists, and the National Endowment of the Arts. Citizen holds the distinction of being the only poetry book to be a New York Times bestseller in the nonfiction category. She is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and teaches at Yale University as the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry. She lives in New Haven, CT.

    For more information on Claudia Rankine, please visit https://blueflowerarts.com/artist/claudia-rankine/

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Oct
    16
    5:30pm - 7:00pm

    Sara Houston • Creative Medicine Lecture • Title tba

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Sara Houston , Principal Lecturer at the Department of Dance, University of Roehampton, London, will give a presentation as part of the Creative Medicine series .

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    Creative Medicine Series, Humanities
  • India was the scene for the production of a vast, internally diverse chronicle literature in Persian during the period 1500–1900 C.E. During the 19th century, European scholars made selective use of this material to create the modern understanding of South Asian history that remains dominant to the present. Shahzad Bashir discusses concepts pertaining to time that undergird a variety of understandings of the past in the original literature, highlighting matters left out by 19th-century interpreters and their later followers invested in nationalist histories. The exploration is part of a larger project aimed at questioning the framework for ‘Islamic’ history in modern scholarship.

    Shahzad Bashir specializes in Islamic Studies with interests in the intellectual and social histories of the societies of Iran and Central and South Asia circa 14th century C.E. to the present. His published work is concerned with the study of Sufism and Shi’ism, messianic movements originating in Islamic contexts, representation of corporeality in hagiographic texts and Persian miniature paintings, religious developments during the Timurid and Safavid periods, and modern transformations of Islamic societies.

    Early Modern World, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Nov
    6

    Yoon Sun Lee , Professor of English at Wellesley College, will give this year’s Sarah Cutts Frerichs Lecture in Victorian Studies

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    The Sarah Cutts Frerichs Lecture in Victorian Studies  is presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Humanities, Sarah Cutts Frerichs Lecture in Victorian Studies
  • What do a Chinese élite lady in Shanghai, a Portuguese duchess in Madrid, an Austrian queen in Lisbon, and a Bavarian countess in Augsburg all have in common? These women, in spite of distance in time and space, all became revered patronesses of the Jesuit missions in China in the early modern period.

    Candida Xu (許甘第大, 1607-1680), granddaughter of the most prominent Chinese Catholic convert of the late Ming period, the imperial Grand Secretary Xu Guangqi 徐光啓, once widowed at age forty-six poured her fortune and energies in religious endeavors within the Catholic mission, and became a paragon of patronage and holiness both for her compatriots and the European readers of her French (1688), Spanish (1691) and Dutch (1694) biographies.

    The Portuguese noblewoman and heiress Maria de Guadalupe de Lencastre y Cárdenas Manrique, Duchess of Aveiro (1630-1715), cultivated a sprawling epistolary network with Jesuit missionaries across the globe, including several in China, financially supporting them, and receiving in return spiritual blessings and information on their activities.

    Maria Anna Habsburg of Austria (1683-1754), Queen Consort of Portugal and Regent of Portugal from 1742 until 1750, through her Jesuit confessor, the Austrian astronomer of the China Portuguese mission Augustin Hallerstein, organized a lavish embassy to the Qianlong Emperor to save the Chinese church from annihilation.

    Finally, Countess Maria Theresia von Fugger-Wellenburg (1690-1762), a descendant of the Fugger banking dynasty in Swabia, through the Bavarian Jesuit Florian Bahr, supported Chinese abandoned infants and acted as a chain of communication between the Qing and the Wittelsbach courts.

    This presentation examines these prominent women’s interactions with, and patronage of, the Jesuit missionaries in China, and, how, through their correspondence, as well as their political and financial influence, they sustained a far-flung network of male ecclesiastical admirers and expressed feminine spirituality and influence across the continents.

    Eugenio Menegon teaches Chinese and world history at Boston University. His latest book, Ancestors, Virgins, and Friars: Christianity as a Local Religion in Late Imperial China (Harvard Asia Center and Harvard University Press, 2009) centers on the life of Catholic communities in Fujian province since the 1630s. His current book project is an examination of the daily life and political networking of European residents at the Qing court in Beijing in the 17th and 18th centuries.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World , is free and open to the public. 

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • Nov
    14

    Bénédicte Boisseron , Associate Professor in French and Francophone Studies, University of Montana, will give a presentation as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Dec
    6
    All Day

    Conference • “Political Concepts: Retouch”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    December 6 and 7, 2019

    The year’s conference of the Political Concepts  Initiative is dedicated to the theme of “Retouch” and it explores different modalities and initiatives of repair and reparation, redress and restoration, recovery and renewal, redistribution, remedy and recuperation, resurgence and the retouch of shared worlds. These are impacted by lasting structures of imperialism, racial capitalism, and gender violence.

    Speakers will address questions related to lasting structures of imperialism, racial capitalism, and gender violence, catalyzed by present movements such as Black Lives Matter, DAPL, food sovereignty, and #Me Too. Participants are invited to propose and engage with concepts through which these crimes and the indispensability of reparations and retouch can be described, explained and analyzed, and a different world can be imagined once these crimes are acknowledged.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    Conference, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Feb
    12
    5:30pm - 7:30pm

    Adam Gopnik • “Liberalism and Love”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Lecture and Book Signing

    Adam Gopnik has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1987. During his three decades at the magazine, he has written fiction, humor, memoirs, critical essays, and reported pieces from at home and abroad. Gopnik has three National Magazine awards, for essays and for criticism, and also a George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. He is the author of numerous books, including A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventures of Liberalism, At The Strangers’ Gate, The Table Comes First, Paris To The Moon, Through The Children’s Gate and the children’s novel The King’s Window. A musical, written in collaboration with the composer David Shire, “The Most Beautiful Room In New York,” opened May 2017 at the Long Wharf Theater in New Haven, and his one man show “The Gates” is based on material developed with The Moth. In March of 2013, Gopnik was awarded the medal of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Montreal, he lives in New York City.

    For more information on Adam Gopnik, please visit https://blueflowerarts.com/artist/adam-gopnik/

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Feb
    20
    5:30pm

    Anne Dunlop, University of Melbourne

    List Art Building

    Anne Dunlop, Professor of Fine Arts, Culture and Communication at University of Melbourne will present the second lecture in the yearlong lecture series entitled “On Speculation.”

    The series is sponsored byThe Department of the History of Art and Architecture’s Margerie Cutler, Joseph Edinburgh, and Kenneth List funds, The Anita Glass Memorial Lecture Fund, The Center for Contemporary South Asia, the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, and the C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund.

    Early Modern World, HIAA Annual Lecture Series, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Apr
    3
    All Day

    Conference • “Capitalism and the Human”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    In a world in which capitalist expansion seems perpetually on the verge of taking leave of human scales of experience and value, what has happened to the philosophical critique of the human, one of the most influential traditions of twentieth-century radical thought? With the threats to human existence and autonomy posed by climate change, surveillance capitalism, and the effects of rapid techno-social innovation, is there any political appetite or space left for a critique of humanist ideology? When human qualities of living and interacting seem threatened by neoliberal modes of rationality, is there a case for substantially recasting the terms of posthumanist critical thought, or should resistance take the form of a radical defense of the human and humanity? This conference begins from the premise that any thinking of the human today, from whatever position, must be accompanied by close attention to the dynamics of contemporary capitalism; and, conversely, that the critique of contemporary capitalism cannot evade the encounter with the question of the human.

    Additional information is forthcoming.

    The conference is co-organized by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English and Interim Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and Jeremy Gilbert, Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London, and Visiting Professor in the Humanities at Brown University this Spring 2020.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities
  • Lecture and Conversation

    Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa, and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; and, most recently, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. She is the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes and an American Book Award, and has twice been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her most recent novel, Lost Children Archive, longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019, is her first to be written in English. Her work has appeared in The New York Times and McSweeney’s among other publications and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She lives in New York City.

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    16
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Cate Sandilands • Lecture in Environmental Humanities • Title tba

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Catriona (Cate) Sandilands is Professor of Environmental Studies at York University, Toronto.

    Her areas of research include environmental humanities and ecocriticism; environmental public cultures and biopolitics; queer, trans* and feminist ecologies; critical plant studies; biocultural diversity and multispecies cohabitation. Professor Sandilands will give a lecture as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • May
    1
    All Day

    Collaborative Public Workshop

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Public Workshop concludes the offering of the capstone seminar for the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities . The seminar, HMAN 2500: Project Development Workshop, is taught in Spring 2020 by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English, and Brian Meeks, Professor of Africana Studies.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative , is free and open to the public.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities, Social Sciences