Upcoming Events

  • In 1825, Ludwig van Beethoven, recovering from illness, composed music for two violins, viola, and cello that he titled “Holy song of thanks to the Deity from a convalescent, in the Lydian mode” (Heiliger Dankgesang eines Genesenen an die Gottheit, in der lydischen Tonart). The piece became the third movement of his String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Op. 132. In this talk with musical excerpts, speaker Brian Alverson offers an account of the circumstances in which Beethoven found himself and a reading of the movement as a reflection on end-of-life experience. Members of the Newport String Project featuring EmmaLee Holmes-Hicks and Ealain McMullin violins, Jesse Holstein, viola, and Heath Marlow, cello, will give a performance of the movement.

    Brian Alverson, MD is Director of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Hasbro Children’s Hospital and Professor of Pediatrics at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

    Based in Newport, RI, the Newport String Project combines music performance with youth mentoring to build a community that crosses boundaries of generation, heritage, and economic circumstances through access to inspiring musical experiences for all. More information at http://www.newportstringproject.org/

    This event is part of the Creative Medicine Lecture Series which is co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine.

    Arts, Performance, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Creative Medicine Series, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dec
    7
    All Day

    Conference • “Political Concepts: The Science Edition”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The annual conference of the Political Concepts Initiative will be dedicated to analyzing the contemporary conditions of knowledge production, with a focus on the sciences and the university.

    Speakers present a single concept, one that needs to be revised, deconstructed, or invented in order to better understand, criticize, and, if necessary resist recent changes in the organization of scientific knowledge – and academic knowledge more broadly. This concept is a tool for a critical explication of ways in which scientific knowledges have been impacted by, and integrated into the neoliberal economy and global order, the forces that have eroded liberal democratic regimes and brought about the disintegration of the common, as well as the struggles for decolonization, democracy and social justice. Presentations question, first, the ways these processes, forces, and struggles work through the sciences and transform the inner fabric of scientific research and academic practice, and second, how science itself has been shaped as an arena of political struggle.

    Friday, December 7
    8:45 AM – 9:00 AM Greetings and Opening Remarks
    9:00 AM – 12:00 AM Anne Fausto Sterling • Truth
    Stephanie Dick • Database
    Dan Hirschman • Stylized Facts
    Moderator: Amanda Anderson
    11:20 AM – 11:40 AM Coffee Break
    11:40 AM – 1:30 PM

    Rebecca Nedostup • Practice/Praxis
    Barbara Herrnstein Smith • Scientism
    Moderator: Sharon Krause

    1:30 PM – 3:00 PM Lunch Break
    3:00 PM – 4:50 PM Alex Csiszar • Peer Review
    Kaushik Sunder Rajan • Value
    Moderator: Adi Ophir
    4:50 PM – 5:10 PM Coffee Break
    5:10 PM – 7:00 PM Raphael Sassower • Scientific Progress
    Tamara Chin • Homo Geoeconomicus
    Moderator: Etienne Balibar
       
    Saturday, December 8
    9:10 AM – 11:00 AM Etienne Benson • Environment
    Joanna Radin • Future
    Moderator: Tim Bewes
    11:00 AM – 11:20 AM Coffee Break
    11:20 AM – 1:10 PM Mara Mills • Impairment
    Iris Montero • Scala Naturae
    Moderator: Leela Gandhi
    1:10 PM – 2:40 PM Lunch Break
    2:40 PM – 4:30 PM Banu Subramaniam • Diaspora/e
    Suman Seth • Race
    Moderator: Lukas Rieppel
    4:30 PM – 4:50 PM Coffee Break
    4:50 PM – 6:40 PM Yarden Katz • Entrepreneurial Science
    Peter Galison and Noah Feldman • Corporatized Knowledge
    Moderator: Jacques Lezra

    The event is free and open to the public.

    This conference is funded in part by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureship, the CV Starr Foundation Lectureship, the Humanities Initiative Programming Fund, and the Program in Science, Technologies, and Society.

    Conference, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative, Social Sciences
  • Dec
    8
    All Day

    Conference • “Political Concepts: The Science Edition”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The annual conference of the Political Concepts Initiative will be dedicated to analyzing the contemporary conditions of knowledge production, with a focus on the sciences and the university.

    Speakers present a single concept, one that needs to be revised, deconstructed, or invented in order to better understand, criticize, and, if necessary resist recent changes in the organization of scientific knowledge – and academic knowledge more broadly. This concept is a tool for a critical explication of ways in which scientific knowledges have been impacted by, and integrated into the neoliberal economy and global order, the forces that have eroded liberal democratic regimes and brought about the disintegration of the common, as well as the struggles for decolonization, democracy and social justice. Presentations question, first, the ways these processes, forces, and struggles work through the sciences and transform the inner fabric of scientific research and academic practice, and second, how science itself has been shaped as an arena of political struggle.

    Friday, December 7
    8:45 AM – 9:00 AM Greetings and Opening Remarks
    9:00 AM – 12:00 AM Anne Fausto Sterling • Truth
    Stephanie Dick • Database
    Dan Hirschman • Stylized Facts
    Moderator: Amanda Anderson
    11:20 AM – 11:40 AM Coffee Break
    11:40 AM – 1:30 PM Rebecca Nedostup • Practice/Praxis
    Barbara Herrnstein Smith • Scientism
    Moderator: Sharon Krause
    1:30 PM – 3:00 PM Lunch Break
    3:00 PM – 4:50 PM Alex Csiszar • Peer Review
    Kaushik Sunder Rajan • Value
    Moderator: Adi Ophir
    4:50 PM – 5:10 PM Coffee Break
    5:10 PM – 7:00 PM Raphael Sassower • Scientific Progress
    Tamara Chin • Homo Geoeconomicus
    Moderator: Etienne Balibar
       
    Saturday, December 8
    9:10 AM – 11:00 AM Etienne Benson • Environment
    Joanna Radin • Future
    Moderator: Tim Bewes
    11:00 AM – 11:20 AM Coffee Break
    11:20 AM – 1:10 PM Mara Mills • Impairment
    Iris Montero • Scala Naturae
    Moderator: Leela Gandhi
    1:10 PM – 2:40 PM Lunch Break
    2:40 PM – 4:30 PM Banu Subramaniam • Diaspora/e
    Suman Seth • Race
    Moderator: Lukas Rieppel
    4:30 PM – 4:50 PM Coffee Break
    4:50 PM – 6:40 PM Yarden Katz • Entrepreneurial Science
    Peter Galison and Noah Feldman • Corporatized Knowledge
    Moderator: Jacques Lezra

    The event is free and open to the public.

    This conference is funded in part by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureship, the CV Starr Foundation Lectureship, the Humanities Initiative Programming Fund, and the Program in Science, Technologies, and Society.

    Conference, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative, Social Sciences
  • Dec
    10
    12:30pm - 1:30pm

    Winter Concert with Benjamin Nacar ‘12

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Program:

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    Sonata, K. 330
    Franz Schubert - Franz Liszt
    Valse-Caprice no. 7
    Ludwig van Beethoven – Franz Liszt – Benjamin Nacar
    Symphony no. 9, movement 4

    Arts, Performance, Humanities
  • Jan
    31

    Joyce Chaplin’s current research examines climate change and climate science in eighteenth-century early America, focusing on awareness of and responses to the Little Ice Age. The invention and circulation of the Franklin stove is the central example of her study. Climate history is an important new subject for historians, given that public debates over climate and resource scarcity have become urgent. Belief that our dilemma is unprecedented is inaccurate and unhelpful, perhaps especially within the United States. Climate-change mitigation existed in the past and analysis of it reveals useful patterns of success and failure. Early American history has tended to emphasize non-environmental themes and events — especially the American Revolution as national pivot. But this history of politics, of human-to-human relations, was always entangled in human use and knowledge of the natural world. Early Americans themselves knew this. Benjamin Franklin knew he was living in an age of climate change, in response to which he designed a heating system and articulated a climate science. Both are significant. Franklin’s proposals about maximizing the production of heat from a minimal quantity of fuel were widely translated and discussed — they were profound Enlightenment statements about settler colonialism, resource conservation, and climate change.

    Joyce E. Chaplin (BA Northwestern; MA and PhD, Johns Hopkins) is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University. A former Fulbright Scholar to the United Kingdom, she has taught at six different universities on two continents, a peninsula, and an island, and in a maritime studies program on the Atlantic Ocean. Her most recent works include Round about the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit (Simon & Schuster, 2012), and (with Alison Bashford) The New Worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus: Rereading the Principle of Population (Princeton University Press, 2016). She is the editor of Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2012) and Thomas Robert Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2017). Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Times Book Review, and the London Review of Books. Her work has been translated into French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Estonian, and, forthcoming, into Turkish and Chinese. She is a current Guggenheim Fellow; she tweets @JoyceChaplin1

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Feb
    1
    9:00am - 11:00am

    Environmental Humanities Workshop with Joyce Chaplin

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    To attend the ‘Environmental Humanities’ workshop with Joyce Chaplin please register at this link.

    Information on workshop location will accompany pre-circulated reading material. Breakfast will be served at this workshop.

    Joyce Chaplin (BA Northwestern; MA and PhD, Johns Hopkins) is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University. A former Fulbright Scholar to the United Kingdom, she has taught at six different universities on two continents, a peninsula, and an island, and in a maritime studies program on the Atlantic Ocean. Her most recent works include Round about the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit (Simon & Schuster, 2012), and (with Alison Bashford) The New Worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus: Rereading the Principle of Population (Princeton University Press, 2016). She is the editor of Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2012) and Thomas Robert Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2017). Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Times Book Review, and the London Review of Books. Her work has been translated into French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Estonian, and, forthcoming, into Turkish and Chinese. She is a current Guggenheim Fellow; she tweets @JoyceChaplin1

    Joyce Chaplin will also give a public lecture titled “The Franklin Stove: Heat and Life in the Little Ice Age” on Thursday, January 31, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. in Pembroke Hall 305.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Mar
    11
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    Mohsin Hamid • Undergraduate Conversation

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This conversation with Mohsin Hamid is for undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event.  Event location will be determined.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    More information about this event will be posted soon.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Mar
    11
    5:30pm - 7:00pm

    Mohsin Hamid in Conversation with Shahzad Bashir

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    New York Times best-selling author Mohsin Hamid, in conversation with Shahzad Bashir, Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Humanities.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    More information about this event will be posted soon.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    4

    Lecture and Book Signing

    Pico Iyer, “arguably the world’s greatest living travel writer” according to Outside magazine, is the author of two novels and several works of nonfiction, including The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. Iyer’s first book, Video Night in Kathmandu, was completed while he was still working as a world affairs writer for Time. It chronicled his explorations across ten countries in Asia and the way these lands have been affected—or not—by the influence of Western culture.

    Iyer, drawing from decades of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama, also authored the bestselling book The Open Road, which The New York Times Book Review called a “trenchant, impassioned look at a singular life.” Iyer’s newest book, Autumn Light, out in April 2019, is a meditation on impermanence, mortality, and grief informed by his more than 30 years of living in Japan. A very different yet complementary work, A Beginner’s Guide to Japan, will also appear in 2019, a few months before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Iyer recently gave three TED Talks that, together, earned eight million views and complemented his 2014 book, The Art of Stillness. His books have been translated into more than 20 languages. He has written liner notes for Leonard Cohen, a film script for Miramax, a libretto for a chamber orchestra, and the introductions to more than 60 other works. He regularly writes on literature for The New York Review of Books; on travel for The Financial Times; and on global culture and news for TimeThe New York Times, and magazines around the world.

    Iyer was born in Oxford, England to parents from India. He was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and earned master’s degrees from Oxford and Harvard as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. This Spring 2019, he is a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton.

    For more information on Pico Iyer, please visit picoiyerjourneys.com.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    5
    9:30am - 11:00am

    Pico Iyer • Undergraduate Conversation

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This conversation with Pico Iyer is for undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event.

    Pico Iyer, “arguably the world’s greatest living travel writer” according to Outside magazine, is the author of two novels and several works of nonfiction, including The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. Iyer’s first book, Video Night in Kathmandu, was completed while he was still working as a world affairs writer for Time. It chronicled his explorations across ten countries in Asia and the way these lands have been affected—or not—by the influence of Western culture.

    Iyer, drawing from decades of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama, also authored the bestselling book The Open Road, which The New York Times Book Review called a “trenchant, impassioned look at a singular life.” Iyer’s newest book, Autumn Light, out in April 2019, is a meditation on impermanence, mortality, and grief informed by his more than 30 years of living in Japan. A very different yet complementary work, A Beginner’s Guide to Japan, will also appear in 2019, a few months before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Iyer recently gave three TED Talks that, together, earned eight million views and complemented his 2014 book, The Art of Stillness. His books have been translated into more than 20 languages. He has written liner notes for Leonard Cohen, a film script for Miramax, a libretto for a chamber orchestra, and the introductions to more than 60 other works. He regularly writes on literature for The New York Review of Books; on travel for The Financial Times; and on global culture and news for TimeThe New York Times, and magazines around the world.

    Iyer was born in Oxford, England to parents from India. He was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and earned master’s degrees from Oxford and Harvard as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. This Spring 2019, he is a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton.

    For more information on Pico Iyer, please visit picoiyerjourneys.com.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    11

    Macarena Gómez-Barris is Professor and Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. She is also Director of the Global South Center (GSC), a research center that works at the intersection of social ecologies, art / politics, and decolonial methodologies. Her instructional focus is on Latinx and Latin American Studies, memory and the afterlives of violence, decolonial theory, the art of social protest, and queer femme epistemes. 

    Macarena is author of Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (2009), co-editor with Herman Gray of Towards a Sociology of the Trace (2010), The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (2017) and Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Politics in the Americas (forthcoming UC Press, 2018). 

    Gómez-Barris is series editor, with Diana Taylor, of Dissident Acts, a Duke University Press Series, and was Fulbright Fellow at FLACSO-Quito in Ecuador (2014–15). She is the current co-editor with Marcial Godoy-Anatavia of e-misférica, an online trilingual journal on hemispheric art and politics (NYU). And, she is a member of the Social Text journal collective.

    At Pratt Institute, she works with a vibrant community of scholars, activists, intellectuals, and students to find alternatives to the impasses produced by racial and extractive capitalism. 

     

    More information about this event will be posted soon.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities