Upcoming Events

  • Nov
    14

    Drawing on recent debates about black lives and animal welfare both coincidentally on the rise in America, Bénédicte Boisseron investigates the relationship between race and the animal in the history and culture of the Americas and the black Atlantic. This conversation is part of the fast-growing interest in human-animal relationships across the humanities and social sciences, an academic trend commonly referred to as ‘the animal turn.’

    Bénédicte Boisseron is Associate Professor of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. She specializes in the fields of black diaspora studies, francophone studies, and animal studies. She is the author of Creole Renegades: Rhetoric of Betrayal and Guilt in the Caribbean Diaspora (University Press of Florida, 2014), 2015 winner of the Nicolás Guillén Outstanding Book Award from the Caribbean Philosophical Association. Her most recent book, Afro-Dog: Blackness and the Animal Question (Columbia University Press, 2018), draws on recent debates about black life and animal rights to investigate the relationship between race and the animal in the history and culture of the Americas and the black Atlantic.

    Free and open to the public. This event, presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), is co-sponsored by the Charles K. Colver Lectureships and Publications Fund; the Departments of French Studies, History, and Religious Studies; the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES); the Program in Science, Technology, and Society; and the Watson Institute.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • To attend the Environmental Humanities workshop with Bénédicte Boisseron  please register at this link.

    The discussion will focus on “The Commensal Dog in a Creole Context,” a chapter from Afro-Dog: Blackness and the Animal Question (Columbia University Press, 2018) which revisits the concept of commensalism within a Caribbean, interspecies and (post-)colonial context. Commensalism, a relationship between two organisms in which one benefits without damage or benefit to the other, is envisioned through the lens of an anticolonial, anti-hegemonic, and anti-anthropocentric context. By addressing the compoundedness of domestication and colonialism, this chapter explores ways to think about relationships beyond a human-animal divide and beyond white supremacy.

    Information on workshop location will accompany pre-circulated reading material. Breakfast will be served at this workshop.

    Bénédicte Boisseron is Associate Professor of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. She specializes in the fields of black diaspora studies, francophone studies, and animal studies. She is the author of Creole Renegades: Rhetoric of Betrayal and Guilt in the Caribbean Diaspora (University Press of Florida, 2014), 2015 winner of the Nicolás Guillén Outstanding Book Award from the Caribbean Philosophical Association. Her most recent book, Afro-Dog: Blackness and the Animal Question (Columbia University Press, 2018), draws on recent debates about black life and animal rights to investigate the relationship between race and the animal in the history and culture of the Americas and the black Atlantic. 

    This event, presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), is co-sponsored by the Charles K. Colver Lectureships and Publications Fund; the Departments of French Studies, History, and Religious Studies; the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES); the Program in Science, Technology, and Society; and the Watson Institute.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Nov
    20
    6:00pm - 8:00pm

    Political Concepts Reading Group • Capitalism and the Human

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Political Concept Reading Group meets monthly. Its 2019-20 theme is Capitalism and the Human, the topic of a conference held at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities on April 3-4, 2020.

    This meeting focuses on excerpts from Asad Haider, Mistaken Identity: Race and Class in the Age of Trump (Verso, 2018).

    All are welcome. To receive the readings or if you have questions please contact the reading group’s 2019-20 organizers, Marah Nagelhout ([email protected] ) and Nick Pisanelli ([email protected] ).

    The Capitalism and the Human Reading Group is part of the Political Concepts Initiative.

    Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Guest seminar open to Brown University members, presented as part of the collaborative humanities course “The Idea of the University” taught by Gerhard Richter and Peter Szendy. To attend this special seminar please register at this link: https://forms.gle/8Uc822JXVu3v9sxU7   (You must be logged into your Brown University email account to access the form.) Reading material will be pre-circulated to registered attendees.

    Silvia Federici is Emerita Professor of Political Philosophy and International Studies at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. In 1972 she was among the founders of the International Feminist Collective, the organization that launched the Campaign for Wages for Housework in the United States and abroad. She has also been active in the anti-globalization and the anti-death penalty movements and was a founding member of the Committee for Academic Freedom in Africa, which for more than a decade documented the struggle of African students against the austerity programs imposed by the IMF and the World Bank on their countries.

    Federici is the author of many essays on political philosophy, feminist theory, cultural studies, and education. Among her published works are The New York Wages for Housework Committee: Theory, History, Documents 1972–1977 (Duke University Press, 2017), co-edited with Arlen Austin; Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction, and Feminist Struggle (PM Press, 2012); and Caliban and the Witch: Women, the Body and Primitive Accumulation (AK Press, 2004).

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities
  • Lecture and Book Signing

    There are few aspects of society untouched by digital communication and the Internet. How do we keep the human presence and perspective, as well as the humanity, inside the personal conversations and interactions we have each day? Our ability to listen, empathize, observe, relate and reason in a thoughtful way are our most vital tools as human communicators. Having just written a book about physician communication, Dr. Schraeder will talk about how the electronic era is impacting connections between humans; the exploration, gathering, and retention of information and knowledge; and ultimately our personal and professional communications skills and relationships.

    Teresa Schraeder is a medical internist, award-winning journalist, and clinical associate professor at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Her professional experience in clinical medicine, medical education, journalism, and mass communication provides a unique background and knowledge base to research and write about effective information exchange and human communication in the world today. She is the author of Physician Communication: Connecting with Patients, Peers, and the Public (Oxford University Press, 2019), and has contributed to the Boston Globe, WCVB-TV, ABC News, 60 Minutes, Good Morning America, WBUR-NPR, the Harvard Neiman Reports, Science Editor, Harvard Health Publications, among other media. A graduate of Tufts University School of Medicine, she completed fellowships at the Harvard School of Public Health and the Kaiser Family Foundation and worked as the Graduate Medical Education Editor for the New England Journal of Medicine. She completed her residency in internal medicine at Mt. Auburn Hospital Harvard Residency Training Program.

    This event, presented as part of Creative Medicine and co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine, is free and open to the public.

    Creative Medicine Series, Humanities
  • Dec
    5
    2:00pm - 4:00pm

    Environmental Humanities Reading Group • Workshop Session

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Environmental Humanities Reading Group fosters an informal and interdisciplinary community around the environmental humanities at Brown. Each meeting, we use the assigned readings as a jumping off point to discuss the role that the humanities might play in confronting environmental crisis and supporting environmental justice.

    This meeting on December 5 takes the form of a workshop session and features informal five-minute talks by a small cohort of presenters about a work in progress (article, book, dissertation, chapter, etc.). Participants will have the opportunity to share constructive feedback.

    Please register at this link for the event and to receive updates. All are welcome to attend, including faculty, staff, graduate students, and undergraduates.

    If you are interested in presenting at this workshop, or would like more information about the event, please reach out to the graduate student coordination, Michael Putnam ([email protected] ). Depending on interest, some participants may be scheduled to present at a second workshop in the spring.

    The Environmental Humanities Reading Group is part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Dec
    6
    All Day

    Conference • “Political Concepts: Retouch”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    December 6 and 7, 2019

    The 2019 annual conference of the Political Concepts  Initiative is dedicated to the theme of “Retouch” and it explores different modalities and initiatives of repair and reparation, redress and restoration, recovery and renewal, redistribution, remedy and recuperation, resurgence and the retouch of shared worlds. These are impacted by lasting structures of imperialism, racial capitalism, and gender violence.

    Speakers will address questions related to lasting structures of imperialism, racial capitalism, and gender violence, catalyzed by present movements such as Black Lives Matter, DAPL, food sovereignty, and #Me Too. Participants are invited to propose and engage with concepts through which these crimes and the indispensability of reparations and retouch can be described, explained and analyzed, and a different world can be imagined once these crimes are acknowledged.

     

    Friday, December 6, 2019
    8:45 AM – 9:15 AM Gathering & Morning Coffee
    9:15 AM – 9:30 AM Greetings and Opening Remarks
    Timothy Bewes (Cogut Institute for the Humanities)
    9:30 AM – 11:20 AM Keisha-Khan Y. Perry (Brown University) • Occupation
    Jasmine Johnston (University of Pennsylvania) • Choreography
    Moderator: Patsy Lewis (Brown University)
    11:20 AM – 11:40 AM Coffee Break
    11:40 AM – 1:30 PM Dixa Ramírez D’Oleo (Brown University) • Indolence
    Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (Dechinta Centre for Research and Learning) • Resurgence
    Moderator: Sharon Krause (Brown University)
    1:30 PM – 3:00 PM Lunch Break
    3:00 PM – 4:50 PM Marisa Fuentes (Rutgers University) • Refuse
    Ariella Aïsha Azoulay (Brown University) • Errata
    Moderator: Leora Maltz-Leca (Rhode Island School of Design)
    4:50 PM – 5:10 PM Coffee Break
    5:10 PM – 7:00 PM Vazira Zamindar (Brown University) • Waiting
    Tina Campt (Brown University) • Adjacency
    Moderator: Naoko Shibusawa (Brown University)
       
    Saturday, December 7, 2019
    8:45 AM – 9:10 AM Morning Coffee
    9:10 AM – 11:00 AM Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman (Brown University) • Regard
    Poulomi Saha (University of California, Berkeley) • Contingency
    Moderator: Itohan Osayimwese (Brown University)
    11:00 AM – 11:20 AM Coffee Break
    11:20 AM – 1:10 PM Imami Perry (Princeton University) • Mother
    Thangam Ravindranathan (Brown University) • Elephant
    Moderator: Vazira Zamindar (Brown University)
    1:10 PM – 2:40 PM Lunch Break
    2:40 PM – 4:30 PM Inderpal Grewal (Yale University) • Plural
    Emily Owens (Brown University) • Violence
    Moderator: Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman (Brown University)
    4:30 PM – 4:50 PM Coffee Break
    4:50 PM – 6:40 PM Patricia Ybarra (Brown University) • Debt
    Saidiya Hartman (Columbia University) • Mutual Aid
    Moderator: Ariella Aïsha Azoulay (Brown University)

    The event is free and open to the public.

    Co-sponsored by the Charles K. Colver Lectureships and Publications, Cogut Institute for the Humanities, Humanities Initiative Programming Fund, Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Studies, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, Departments of Africana Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English, History, History of Art and Architecture, Literary Arts, and Modern Culture and Media.

    Conference, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Dec
    7
    All Day

    Conference • “Political Concepts: Retouch”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    December 6 and 7, 2019

    The 2019 annual conference of the Political Concepts  Initiative is dedicated to the theme of “Retouch” and it explores different modalities and initiatives of repair and reparation, redress and restoration, recovery and renewal, redistribution, remedy and recuperation, resurgence and the retouch of shared worlds. These are impacted by lasting structures of imperialism, racial capitalism, and gender violence.

    Speakers will address questions related to lasting structures of imperialism, racial capitalism, and gender violence, catalyzed by present movements such as Black Lives Matter, DAPL, food sovereignty, and #Me Too. Participants are invited to propose and engage with concepts through which these crimes and the indispensability of reparations and retouch can be described, explained and analyzed, and a different world can be imagined once these crimes are acknowledged.

     

    Saturday, December 7, 2019
    8:45 AM – 9:10 AM Morning Coffee
    9:10 AM – 11:00 AM Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman (Brown University) • Regard
    Poulomi Saha (University of California, Berkeley) • Contingency
    Moderator: Itohan Osayimwese (Brown University)
    11:00 AM – 11:20 AM Coffee Break
    11:20 AM – 1:10 PM Imami Perry (Princeton University) • Mother
    Thangam Ravindranathan (Brown University) • Elephant
    Moderator: Vazira Zamindar (Brown University)
    1:10 PM – 2:40 PM Lunch Break
    2:40 PM – 4:30 PM Inderpal Grewal (Yale University) • Plural
    Emily Owens (Brown University) • Violence
    Moderator: Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman (Brown University)
    4:30 PM – 4:50 PM Coffee Break
    4:50 PM – 6:40 PM Patricia Ybarra (Brown University) • Debt
    Saidiya Hartman (Columbia University) • Mutual Aid
    Moderator: Ariella Aïsha Azoulay (Brown University)

    The event is free and open to the public.

    Co-sponsored by the Charles K. Colver Lectureships and Publications, Cogut Institute for the Humanities, Humanities Initiative Programming Fund, Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Studies, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, Departments of Africana Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English, History, History of Art and Architecture, Literary Arts, and Modern Culture and Media.

    Conference, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Dec
    9
    12:30pm - 1:30pm

    Winter Concert with Benjamin Nacar ‘12

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Pianist and composer Benjamin Nacar ’12 offers a mid-day concert.

    Program:

    • Johann Sebastian Bach, Partita no. 4 in D major, BWV 828
    • Ludwig van Beethoven, Sonata no. 30 in E major, op. 109
    • Benjamin Nacar, Variations on “Happy Birthday” after the manner of Beethoven’s op. 109
    • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Waltz Of The Flowers from The Nutcracker
    • Nikolai Medtner, Fairy Tale in A major, op. 51 no. 3
    • Georges Bizet / Vladimir Horowitz, Carmen Variations
    Humanities
  • Dec
    9
    6:00pm - 8:30pm

    Film Screening • Jafar Panahi, “The Mirror” (Ayneh)

    Acoustic Java Cafe and Microcinema, 204 South Main, Providence, RI 02903

    This second Film-Thinking event features The Mirror (Aynet, 95 minutes, in Persian with English subtitles), a 1997 Iranian film directed by Jafar Panahi . A post-screening conversation begins promptly at 7:40 pm with Brown University faculty Shahzad Bashir, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies, Timothy Bewes, Interim Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and Samine Tabatabaei, Visiting Assistant Professor in Iranian Studies.

    Film summary: When a young girl becomes lost in the hustle and bustle of Tehran, her journey turns into a dazzling exercise on the nature of film itself. In this ingenious and daringly original feature, world renowned director Jafar Panahi (The White Balloon, Crimson Gold) has wrapped a blunt political critique inside the layers of a deceptively simple film.  [from video jacket]

    Film-Thinking is a series of conversations hosted by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities during 2019-2020, which asks how cinema can help us to think the many challenges facing our moment. According to the novelist Jonathan Coe, “A movie is something we should only see when somebody else shows it to us.” In the spirit of Coe’s remark, each Film-Thinking event will comprise a curated screening of a film and a post-screening conversation. A pre-circulated Film Note offers a point of departure for the screening and the discussion. The aim of Film-Thinking is to enlarge our sense of the politics of cinema and collectively expand our understanding of film’s capacity for thought. Screenings begin at 6:00 pm.

    Free and open to the public.

    Food/drinks available for purchase at Acoustic Java Cafe and Microcinema.

    Humanities
  • Dec
    11
    6:00pm - 8:00pm

    Political Concepts Reading Group • Capitalism and the Human

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Political Concept Reading Group meets monthly. Its 2019-20 theme is Capitalism and the Human, the topic of a conference held at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities on April 3-4.

    This meeting focuses on two excerpts from Jason Read’s The Politics of Transindividuality (Brill, 2015):
    • “Transindividuality (A Concept of Marxism)”
    • “Transindividuality as Critique: Spinoza, Hegel, Marx”

    All are welcome. To receive the readings or if you have questions please contact the reading group’s 2019-20 organizers, Marah Nagelhout ([email protected] ) and Nick Pisanelli ([email protected] ).

    The Capitalism and the Human Reading Group is part of the Political Concepts Initiative.

    Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Jan
    29
    6:00pm - 8:00pm

    Political Concepts Reading Group • Capitalism and the Human

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Political Concept Reading Group meets monthly. Its 2019-20 theme is Capitalism and the Human, the topic of a conference held at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities on April 3-4.

    This meeting focuses on two essays from Claire Colebrook’s The Death of the Posthuman, and Sex After Life (Open Humanities Press Michigan Publishing, 2014).
    • “Extinct Theory“ and
    • “The Sustainability of Concepts: Knowledge and Human Interests”

    All are welcome. To receive the readings or if you have questions please contact the reading group’s 2019-20 organizers, Marah Nagelhout ([email protected] ) and Nick Pisanelli ([email protected] ).

    The Capitalism and the Human Reading Group is part of the Political Concepts Initiative.

    Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • Feb
    12
    5:30pm - 7:30pm

    Adam Gopnik • “Liberalism and Love”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Lecture and Book Signing

    Adam Gopnik has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1987. During his three decades at the magazine, he has written fiction, humor, memoirs, critical essays, and reported pieces from at home and abroad. Gopnik has three National Magazine awards, for essays and for criticism, and also a George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. He is the author of numerous books, including A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventures of Liberalism, At The Strangers’ Gate, The Table Comes First, Paris To The Moon, Through The Children’s Gate and the children’s novel The King’s Window. A musical, written in collaboration with the composer David Shire, “The Most Beautiful Room In New York,” opened May 2017 at the Long Wharf Theater in New Haven, and his one man show “The Gates” is based on material developed with The Moth. In March of 2013, Gopnik was awarded the medal of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Montreal, he lives in New York City.

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Feb
    13
    9:00am - 10:30am

    Adam Gopnik • Undergraduate seminar

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This special seminar with Adam Gopnik is for undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event. Event location will be determined.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    Adam Gopnik has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1987. During his three decades at the magazine, he has written fiction, humor, memoirs, critical essays, and reported pieces from at home and abroad. Gopnik has three National Magazine awards, for essays and for criticism, and also a George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. He is the author of numerous books, including A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventures of Liberalism, At The Strangers’ Gate, The Table Comes First, Paris To The Moon, Through The Children’s Gate and the children’s novel The King’s Window. A musical, written in collaboration with the composer David Shire, “The Most Beautiful Room In New York”, opened May 2017 at the Long Wharf Theater in New Haven, and his one man show “The Gates” is based on material developed with The Moth. In March of 2013, Gopnik was awarded the medal of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Montreal, he lives in New York City.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities .

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Feb
    20
    4:30pm - 6:00pm

    Book Salon with Hazel V. Carby

    Smith-Buonanno Hall

    Hazel V. Carby is the Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies, Professor of American Studies Emerita at Yale University.

    This event is convened by Tina Campt, Owen F. Walker Professor of Humanities and Modern Culture and Media, who leads The Black Visuality Initiative at the Cogut Institute.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities
  • Feb
    20
    5:30pm

    Anne Dunlop, University of Melbourne

    List Art Building

    Anne Dunlop, Professor of Fine Arts, Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne will present the second lecture in the yearlong lecture series entitled “On Speculation.”

    The series is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World and the Department of the History of Art and Architecture’s Margerie Cutler, Joseph Edinburgh, and Kenneth List funds.

    Additional support comes from the Center for Contemporary South Asia, and the C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund.

    Early Modern World, HIAA Annual Lecture Series, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Feb
    24
    6:00pm - 9:00pm

    Film Screening • Meenu Gaur and Farjad Nabi, “Zinda Bhaag”

    Acoustic Java Cafe and Microcinema, 204 South Main, Providence, RI 02903

    This Film-Thinking event features Zinda Bhaag (Run for your Life, 120 minutes. in Punjabi with English subtitles), a 2013 Pakistani drama film co-directed by Meenu Gaur and Farjad Nabi. The film focuses on the issue of illegal migration.

    Film-Thinking is a series of conversations hosted by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities during 2019-2020, which asks how cinema can help us to think the many challenges facing our moment. According to the novelist Jonathan Coe, “A movie is something we should only see when somebody else shows it to us.” In the spirit of Coe’s remark, each Film-Thinking event will comprise a curated screening of a film and a post-screening conversation. A pre-circulated Film Note offers a point of departure for the screening and the discussion. The aim of Film-Thinking is to enlarge our sense of the politics of cinema and collectively expand our understanding of film’s capacity for thought. Screenings begin at 6:00 pm.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    Free and open to the public.

    Food/drinks available for purchase at Acoustic Java Cafe and Microcinema.

    Film-Thinking, Humanities
  • Mar
    2
    5:30pm - 7:30pm

    Paul C. Taylor • Politics in the Humanities Lecture (Title TBD)

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Paul C. Taylor is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His areas of research are Race Theory, Aesthetics, Pragmatism, Social and Political Philosophy, and Africana Philosophy. Professor Taylor’s publications include Black Is Beautiful: A Philosophy of Black Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2016) - Winner of the American Society for Aesthetics Outstanding Monograph Prize for 2017; On Obama (Routledge, 2016), and Uneasy Sanctuary: Rethinking Race-Thinking (Oxford UP, under contract).

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event is presented by PITH – Politics in the Humanities and co-sponsored by the Departments of Africana Studies, American Studies, and Philosophy.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH
  • Mar
    5
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Kate Brown • STS/Environmental Humanities Lecture (Title TBD)

    Stephen Robert ’62 Campus Center

    Kate Brown, Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, will give a talk presented by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) and co-sponsored by the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    More information is forthcoming.

    Free and open to the public. This event, presented by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, is co-sponsored by the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB) with the Department of History.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • EARLY MODERN ANNUAL LECTURE
    Writing History in the Sixteenth Century: Remarking the Boundaries of a Discipline in the New Spain

    After their conquest and colonization of Mexico in the 1500s, the Spaniards needed to understand the customs and the past of the native peoples in order to impose their own law and authority. But European ideas of time and history are not universal: how did Mesoamerican cosmology make sense in terms of Christian European chronology? And how did indigenous people retain or understand memory of the pre-Hispanic past? This lecture will show how both Spaniards and Indians began to produce a new form of world history.

    Serge Gruzinski has taught at the Écoles des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), Paris, as well as in Brazil (Bélem) and the United States (Princeton). His work has been translated into numerous languages and he has authored more than twenty books including The Mestizo Mind: The Intellectual Dynamics of Colonization and Globalization (Routledge, 2002), What Time is it There? America and Islam at the Dawn of Modern Times (Polity Press, 2011) and The Eagle and the Dragon: Globalization and European Dreams of Conquest in China and America in the Sixteenth Century (Polity Press, 2014). He has received several honorary doctorates and awards, including the Howard F. Cline Memorial Prize 1991, Médaille d’argent of the CNRS 1996, Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur 2000, and the First International Prize in History at the 22nd Congress of the International Committee of Historical Sciences (ICHS) in Jinan, China in 2015.

    This is the first of a series of prestigious public lectures instituted at Brown by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World. The lectures will be held each year in the Spring semester.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public.

    Early Modern World, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Lecture and Conversation

    Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa, and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; and, most recently, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. She is the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes and an American Book Award, and has twice been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her most recent novel, Lost Children Archive, longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019, is her first to be written in English. Her work has appeared in The New York Times and McSweeney’s among other publications and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She lives in New York City.

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Mar
    13
    10:00am - 11:30am

    Valeria Luiselli • Undergraduate seminar

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This special seminar with Valeria Luiselli is for undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event. Event location will be determined.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa, and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; and, most recently, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. She is the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes and an American Book Award, and has twice been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her most recent novel, Lost Children Archive, longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019, is her first to be written in English. Her work has appeared in The New York Times and McSweeney’s among other publications and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She lives in New York City.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities .

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    3
    All Day

    Conference • “Capitalism and the Human”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    In a world in which capitalist expansion seems perpetually on the verge of taking leave of human scales of experience and value, what has happened to the philosophical critique of the human, one of the most influential traditions of twentieth-century radical thought? With the threats to human existence and autonomy posed by climate change, surveillance capitalism, and the effects of rapid techno-social innovation, is there any political appetite or space left for a critique of humanist ideology? When human qualities of living and interacting seem threatened by neoliberal modes of rationality, is there a case for substantially recasting the terms of posthumanist critical thought, or should resistance take the form of a radical defense of the human and humanity? This conference begins from the premise that any thinking of the human today, from whatever position, must be accompanied by close attention to the dynamics of contemporary capitalism; and, conversely, that the critique of contemporary capitalism cannot evade the encounter with the question of the human.

    Additional information is forthcoming.

    The conference is co-organized by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English and Interim Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and Jeremy Gilbert, Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London, and Visiting Professor in the Humanities at Brown University this Spring 2020.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities
  • Apr
    8
    5:30pm - 7:00pm

    Mikkael Sekeres, MD • Creative Medicine Lecture (Title TBD)

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Mikkael Sekeres, MD, MS is Professor of Medicine and Director of the Leukemia Program, Department of Hematologic Oncology and Blood Disorders, at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute. He is the author or co-author of over 230 articles and over 250 abstracts published in leading journals such as Blood, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Nature Genetics, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, PLoS One, Cancer, Haematologica, and Leukemia. He is also the co-author of 6 books; the editor-in-chief of the ASH Clinical News magazine; and is an essayist for The New York Times and Huffington Post.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event, presented as part of Creative Medicine and co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine, is free and open to the public.

    Creative Medicine Series, Humanities
  • Apr
    10
    12:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conference • Radical Gardening in the Time of Climate Change

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The conveners of this conference are Mary Baker, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science, Brown University, and Elizabeth Hoover , Associate Professor of American Studies at Brown University.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event is presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), it is free and open to the public.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Apr
    16
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Catriona Sandilands • Lecture in Environmental Humanities (TitleTBD)

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Catriona Sandilands is Professor of Environmental Studies at York University, Toronto. Her areas of research include environmental humanities and ecocriticism; environmental public cultures and biopolitics; queer, trans* and feminist ecologies; critical plant studies; biocultural diversity and multispecies cohabitation. 

    Free and open to the public. This event, presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), is co-sponsored by the Charles K. Colver Lectureships and Publications Fund; the Departments of French Studies, History, and Religious Studies; the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES); the Program in Science, Technology, and Society; and the Watson Institute.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • May
    1
    All Day

    Collaborative Public Workshop

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Public Workshop concludes the offering of the capstone seminar for the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities . The seminar, HMAN 2500: Project Development Workshop, is taught in Spring 2020 by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English, and Brian Meeks, Professor of Africana Studies.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative, is free and open to the public.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • May
    7
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    Collaborative Humanities Retreat

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Humanities Retreat offers faculty and students an opportunity to reflect on the program and concludes the third academic year of the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities,  which is part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative.

    More information about this event is forthcoming.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative