Upcoming Events

  • Jan
    31

    Joyce Chaplin’s current research examines climate change and climate science in eighteenth-century early America, focusing on awareness of and responses to the Little Ice Age. The invention and circulation of the Franklin stove is the central example of her study. Climate history is an important new subject for historians, given that public debates over climate and resource scarcity have become urgent. Belief that our dilemma is unprecedented is inaccurate and unhelpful, perhaps especially within the United States. Climate-change mitigation existed in the past and analysis of it reveals useful patterns of success and failure. Early American history has tended to emphasize non-environmental themes and events — especially the American Revolution as national pivot. But this history of politics, of human-to-human relations, was always entangled in human use and knowledge of the natural world. Early Americans themselves knew this. Benjamin Franklin knew he was living in an age of climate change, in response to which he designed a heating system and articulated a climate science. Both are significant. Franklin’s proposals about maximizing the production of heat from a minimal quantity of fuel were widely translated and discussed — they were profound Enlightenment statements about settler colonialism, resource conservation, and climate change.

    Joyce E. Chaplin (BA Northwestern; MA and PhD, Johns Hopkins) is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University. A former Fulbright Scholar to the United Kingdom, she has taught at six universities on two continents, a peninsula, and an island, and in a maritime studies program on the Atlantic Ocean. Her most recent works include Round about the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit (Simon & Schuster, 2012), and (with Alison Bashford) The New Worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus: Rereading the Principle of Population (Princeton University Press, 2016). She is the editor of Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2012) and Thomas Robert Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2017). Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Times Book Review, and the London Review of Books. Her work has been translated into French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Estonian, and, forthcoming, into Turkish and Chinese. She is a current Guggenheim Fellow; she tweets @JoyceChaplin1.

    This event, presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), is free and open to the public.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Feb
    1
    9:00am - 11:00am

    Environmental Humanities Workshop with Joyce Chaplin

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    To attend the Environmental Humanities workshop with Joyce Chaplin please register at this link.

    The discussion will focus on the pre-industrial era of American history, the arrival of the industrial revolution, and the crucial turn toward carbon-based energy in the US. 

    Information on the workshop’s location will accompany pre-circulated reading material. Breakfast will be served.

    Joyce Chaplin (BA Northwestern; MA and PhD, Johns Hopkins) is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard University. A former Fulbright Scholar to the United Kingdom, she has taught at six universities on two continents, a peninsula, and an island, and in a maritime studies program on the Atlantic Ocean. Her most recent works include Round about the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit (Simon & Schuster, 2012), and (with Alison Bashford) The New Worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus: Rereading the Principle of Population (Princeton University Press, 2016). She is the editor of Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2012) and Thomas Robert Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population: A Norton Critical Edition (Norton, 2017). Her reviews and essays have appeared in the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Times Book Review, and the London Review of Books. Her work has been translated into French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Estonian, and, forthcoming, into Turkish and Chinese. She is a current Guggenheim Fellow; she tweets @JoyceChaplin1.

    Joyce Chaplin will also give a public lecture titled “The Franklin Stove: Heat and Life in the Little Ice Age” on Thursday, January 31, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. in Pembroke Hall 305.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Naples possesses the relics of S. Gennaro, including his head, bones, and dried blood which melts and boils up to three times a year. The miraculous liquefaction drew visitors from all over Counter-Reformation Europe. In the seventeenth century, authors complained that even though Muley el-Hassan, the exiled king of Tunis, had seen the miracle in 1543, he still failed to convert. The example of his hard heart only enhanced the spectacular cases of those Muslims who did seek baptism, including some members of the king’s own family. 

    Cristelle Baskins studies political allegory, domestic painting, and Renaissance art in modern film. She has published widely in scholarly journals such as Art History, Oxford Art Journal, The Burlington Magazine, and Studies in Iconography. Her book, Cassone Painting, Humanism and Gender in Early Modern Italy (Cambridge University Press, 1998), was awarded an Honorable Mention by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. She has edited two volumes: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy with Sherry Roush and Allegory in Early Modern Visual Culture with Lisa Rosenthal. In 2008–2009, she curated The Triumph of Marriage: Renaissance Painted Wedding Chests, an exhibition for the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston supported by the Mellon and Kress foundations. In 2009-2010, she was on sabbatical as an Aga Khan Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University working on a book project, Picturing North Africa and the Levant in Early Modern Italy.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public. 

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • Feb
    11
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Undergraduate Info Session

    Pembroke Hall

    Passionate about research in the humanities? Come to the info session to learn more about the Cogut Institute, the undergraduate fellowship program, and the application process! Pizza will be served!

    If you´ll be a senior honors student in 2019-20 and are in the humanities or humanistic social sciences, you are eligible to apply for an undergraduate fellowship at the Cogut Institute. Our fellows join a stimulating environment, discussing works-in-progress alongside faculty, postdoc, and graduate student fellows. Learn more.

  • Feb
    14
    12:30pm - 2:00pm

    PITH — Politics in the Humanities Seminar with Lori Marso

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This PITH Seminar with Prof. Lori Marso, author of Politics with Beauvoir: Freedom in the Encounter (Duke 2017) is open to graduate students only.  The event location will be announced in the confirmation email to the registrants.  Lunch will be provided.

    To attend the PITH Seminar with Lori Marso please register at this link.

    Lori Marso is the Doris Zemurray Stone Professor of Historical and Literary Studies and Professor of Political Science at Union College in Schenectady, NY. She is the author or editor of several books and articles. Her most recent book Politics with Beauvoir: Freedom in the Encounter (Duke 2017) won the inaugural Pamela Grande Jensen Book Award, presented by the Politics, Literature, and Film section of the American Political Science Association. Her articles have won the Susan Okin and Iris Marion Young Award for Feminist Political Theory (2013), the Marion Irish Award (2009), the Wilson Carey McWilliams Award (2018), the Betty Nesvold Award (2008), and the Contemporary Political Theory Award (2014). She is a Consulting Editor to the journal Political Theory.

    This event, presented as part of the PITH – Politics in the Humanities lecture series, is limited to graduate students. Information about registration and location is forthcoming.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH, Social Sciences
  • Feb
    14
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Lori Marso • “Dear Dick: A Feminist Politics of the Epistolary”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Beginning with Laura Mulvey’s pioneering work on how narrative film replicates the male gaze by sexually objectifying women’s bodies, this talk charts the visibility of women’s bodies and the circulation of sexual desires to explore what happens when women’s desires are made public. Focusing on Jill Soloway’s 2017 television adaptation of Chris Kraus’s pioneering 1995 feminist memoir I Love Dick, Lori Marso suggests that the television show may be seen as a reception of the work of feminist filmmaker Catherine Breillat, specifically her 1999 film Romance. For Breillat, women’s sexual desire is female genitalia and fluids, ontological evidence presented as a challenge to male impotence. In Soloway’s I Love Dick, the body is shown as a less reliable indicator of desire, although it doesn’t disappear. Letters, circulated and read by others, make women’s desires public and their bodies visible. What if we all started writing love letters to Dick? Another way to ask this question: how can women’s desires be made visible?

    Lori Marso is the Doris Zemurray Stone Professor of Historical and Literary Studies and Professor of Political Science at Union College in Schenectady, NY. She is the author or editor of several books and articles. Her most recent book Politics with Beauvoir: Freedom in the Encounter (Duke 2017) won the inaugural Pamela Grande Jensen Book Award, presented by the Politics, Literature, and Film section of the American Political Science Association. Her articles have won the Susan Okin and Iris Marion Young Award for Feminist Political Theory (2013), the Marion Irish Award (2009), the Wilson Carey McWilliams Award (2018), the Betty Nesvold Award (2008), and the Contemporary Political Theory Award (2014). She is a Consulting Editor to the journal Political Theory.

    This event, presented as part of the PITH – Politics in the Humanities lecture series, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    6

    Complexity and uncertainty are common features of our everyday lives. However, we tend to do everything we can to minimize their presence and effect. This effort operates at the small, transactional scale (e.g. handrails on stairs) to large and systemic (e.g. how we organize and structure knowledge). As such, the achievement of expertise within a discipline can also be misunderstood to be the elimination of uncertainty. But what if, in order to articulate and realize new futures with better outcomes, a practitioner needs to have a productive relationship with complexity and uncertainty? This dynamic characterizes creative practices, especially design, and is part of the reason why design has relevance today in unexpected places. In this talk, Justin W. Cook, Director for the Center for Complexity at RISD, explores what can be gained by introducing what appears to be inefficiency, lack of expertise and increased sources of risk into clinical decision making and argues for a greater balance between the evidence-based clinical practice and a practice of uncertainty.

    Justin Cook is a faculty member and Provost Fellow at RISD where he works to advance strategic design and its capacity to be transformative. He works with research teams at MIT and Harvard, and is Senior Lead for Strategy at the Finnish Innovation Fund, Sitra, advising project teams on impact investing, internationalization, and urban development.

    This event is part of the Creative Medicine Series which is co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine.

    Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Creative Medicine Series, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    11
    4:00pm - 5:00pm

    Undergraduate Seminar with Mohsin Hamid

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This conversation with Mohsin Hamid is for undergraduate students only. Information about registration and location is forthcoming.  

    Mohsin Hamid was born in 1971 in Lahore. He grew up mostly in Pakistan but spent part of his childhood in California and returned to America to attend Princeton University and Harvard Law School. He then worked in New York and London as a management consultant before pursuing writing full-time in Lahore.

    His first novel, Moth Smoke (2000), told the story of an ex-banker and heroin addict in contemporary Lahore. Published in 14 languages, it was the winner of a Betty Trask Award and a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award. His second novel, The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2007), recounted a Pakistani man’s abandonment of his high-flying life in New York. Published in over 30 languages, it became a million-copy international bestseller. It won the Ambassador Book Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the Asian American Literary Award, and the South Bank Show Award for Literature, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. The Guardian named it one of the books that defined the decade. A 2013 film of The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Oscar-nominated director Mira Nair starred Riz Ahmed, Liev Schreiber, Kate Hudson, and Kiefer Sutherland. With his third novel How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia (2013), Hamid “reaffirmed his place as one of his generation’s most inventive and gifted writers,” in the words of Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times. This love story in the apparent guise of a self-help book explored mass-urbanization and global economic transformation. Hamid’s fourth novel, Exit West, is a New York Times Bestseller and was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize.

    Mohsin Hamid writes regularly for The New York TimesThe Guardian, and The New York Review of Books and has lectured at dozens of universities around the world. In 2013, Foreign Policy magazine named him one of the world’s 100 Leading Global Thinkers.

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Mar
    11
    5:30pm - 7:00pm

    Mohsin Hamid in Conversation with Shahzad Bashir

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Public Conversation

    Mohsin Hamid was born in 1971 in Lahore. He grew up mostly in Pakistan but spent part of his childhood in California and returned to America to attend Princeton University and Harvard Law School. He then worked in New York and London as a management consultant before pursuing writing full-time in Lahore.

    His first novel, Moth Smoke (2000), told the story of an ex-banker and heroin addict in contemporary Lahore. Published in 14 languages, it was the winner of a Betty Trask Award and a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award. His second novel, The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2007), recounted a Pakistani man’s abandonment of his high-flying life in New York. Published in over 30 languages, it became a million-copy international bestseller. It won the Ambassador Book Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the Asian American Literary Award, and the South Bank Show Award for Literature, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. The Guardian named it one of the books that defined the decade. A 2013 film of The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Oscar-nominated director Mira Nair starred Riz Ahmed, Liev Schreiber, Kate Hudson, and Kiefer Sutherland. With his third novel How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia (2013), Hamid “reaffirmed his place as one of his generation’s most inventive and gifted writers,” in the words of Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times. This love story in the apparent guise of a self-help book explored mass-urbanization and global economic transformation. Hamid’s fourth novel, Exit West, is a New York Times Bestseller and was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize.

    Mohsin Hamid writes regularly for The New York Times, The Guardian, and The New York Review of Books and has lectured at dozens of universities around the world. In 2013, Foreign Policy magazine named him one of the world’s 100 Leading Global Thinkers.

    At Brown University, Shahzad Bashir is Director of Middle East Studies, Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Humanities, and Professor of Religious Studies. His research interests lay in the intellectual and social histories of the societies of Iran and Central and South Asia from the fourteenth century CE to the present. He is the editor, with Robert Crews, of Under the Drones: Modern Lives in the Afghanistan-Pakistan Borderlands (Harvard University Press, 2012) and, most recently, the author of Sufi Bodies: Religion and Society in Medieval Islam (Columbia University Press, 2013). His current project, “Islamic Pasts and Futures: Horizons of Time,” is under preparation as a digital scholarly monograph that emphasizes the multiplicity of temporal configurations found in Islamic materials.

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • More information forthcoming.

    Ramie Targoff is Professor of English at Brandeis University. She teaches and studies Renaissance literature, with an emphasis on the relationship between literature and religion. She has written books on the invention of common prayer and its influence on Renaissance devotional poetry, on the works of the poet and preacher John Donne, and on Renaissance love poetry. Her newest book, Renaissance Woman: The Life of Vittoria Colonna (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018), is a biography of the sixteenth-century Italian poet.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public. 

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • Lecture and Book Signing

    Pico Iyer, “arguably the world’s greatest living travel writer” according to Outside magazine, is the author of two novels and several works of nonfiction, including The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. Iyer’s first book, Video Night in Kathmandu, was completed while he was still working as a world affairs writer for Time. It chronicled his explorations across ten countries in Asia and the way these lands have been affected—or not—by the influence of Western culture.

    Iyer, drawing from decades of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama, also authored the bestselling book The Open Road, which The New York Times Book Review called a “trenchant, impassioned look at a singular life.” Iyer’s newest book, Autumn Light, out in April 2019, is a meditation on impermanence, mortality, and grief informed by his more than 30 years of living in Japan. A very different yet complementary work, A Beginner’s Guide to Japan, will also appear in 2019, a few months before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Iyer recently gave three TED Talks that, together, earned eight million views and complemented his 2014 book, The Art of Stillness. His books have been translated into more than 20 languages. He has written liner notes for Leonard Cohen, a film script for Miramax, a libretto for a chamber orchestra, and the introductions to more than 60 other works. He regularly writes on literature for The New York Review of Books; on travel for The Financial Times; and on global culture and news for TimeThe New York Times, and magazines around the world.

    Iyer was born in Oxford, England to parents from India. He was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and earned master’s degrees from Oxford and Harvard as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. This Spring 2019, he is a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton.

    For more information on Pico Iyer, please visit picoiyerjourneys.com.

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    5
    All Day

    Conference • “Narratives of Debt”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Narratives of Debt will gather key thinkers in contemporary critical theory to explore the question of debt in an interdisciplinary perspective, ranging from the history of slavery to psychoanalysis, from literature to financial capitalism, from philosophy to cryptocurrencies. The conference is committed to examining the various ways of narrating—witnessing—the condition of being indebted and the historical rise of indebtedness as a mode of governance (each narrative entailing decisions about justice, ethics, politics). Debt itself will also be considered as a narrative, i.e., a performative fiction that organizes time by linking past, present, and future in a diegetic chain. Money, if we define it with Deleuze and Guattari as “the means for rendering the debt infinite,” constitutes the backdrop of this economic narratology.

    Co-organized by Peter Szendy (Brown University) and Emmanuel Bouju (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3), the conference features scholars from a broad range of fields. Speakers include Arjun Appadurai (New York University), Jennifer Baker (New York University), Anthony Bogues (Brown University), Raphaëlle Guidée (Université de Poitiers), Bonnie Honig (Brown University), Odette Lienau (Cornell Law School), Annie McClanahan (UC Irvine), Florence Magnot-Ogilvy (Université de Rennes 2), Catherine Malabou (Kingston University, London and UC Irvine), Eric Santner (University of Chicago), and Joseph Vogl (Humboldt Universität).

    The conference, presented as part of the Economies of Aesthetics Initiative, is co-sponsored by the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3 and Brown University’s Humanities Initiative Programming Fund and the Departments of Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English, French Studies, German Studies, Modern Culture and Media, and Philosophy. This event is free and open to the public.

    Conference, Economies of Aesthetics, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Apr
    5
    9:30am - 11:00am

    Undergraduate Seminar with Pico Iyer

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This conversation with Pico Iyer is for undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event.

    Pico Iyer, “arguably the world’s greatest living travel writer” according to Outside magazine, is the author of two novels and several works of nonfiction, including The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. Iyer’s first book, Video Night in Kathmandu, was completed while he was still working as a world affairs writer for Time. It chronicled his explorations across ten countries in Asia and the way these lands have been affected—or not—by the influence of Western culture.

    Iyer, drawing from decades of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama, also authored the bestselling book The Open Road, which The New York Times Book Review called a “trenchant, impassioned look at a singular life.” Iyer’s newest book, Autumn Light, out in April 2019, is a meditation on impermanence, mortality, and grief informed by his more than 30 years of living in Japan. A very different yet complementary work, A Beginner’s Guide to Japan, will also appear in 2019, a few months before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Iyer recently gave three TED Talks that, together, earned eight million views and complemented his 2014 book, The Art of Stillness. His books have been translated into more than 20 languages. He has written liner notes for Leonard Cohen, a film script for Miramax, a libretto for a chamber orchestra, and the introductions to more than 60 other works. He regularly writes on literature for The New York Review of Books; on travel for The Financial Times; and on global culture and news for TimeThe New York Times, and magazines around the world.

    Iyer was born in Oxford, England to parents from India. He was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and earned master’s degrees from Oxford and Harvard as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. This Spring 2019, he is a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton.

    For more information on Pico Iyer, please visit picoiyerjourneys.com.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    6
    All Day

    Conference • “Narratives of Debt”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Narratives of Debt will gather key thinkers in contemporary critical theory to explore the question of debt in an interdisciplinary perspective, ranging from the history of slavery to psychoanalysis, from literature to financial capitalism, from philosophy to cryptocurrencies. The conference is committed to examining the various ways of narrating—witnessing—the condition of being indebted and the historical rise of indebtedness as a mode of governance (each narrative entailing decisions about justice, ethics, politics). Debt itself will also be considered as a narrative, i.e., a performative fiction that organizes time by linking past, present, and future in a diegetic chain. Money, if we define it with Deleuze and Guattari as “the means for rendering the debt infinite,” constitutes the backdrop of this economic narratology.

    Co-organized by Peter Szendy (Brown University) and Emmanuel Bouju (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3), the conference features scholars from a broad range of fields. Speakers include Arjun Appadurai (New York University), Jennifer Baker (New York University), Anthony Bogues (Brown University), Raphaëlle Guidée (Université de Poitiers), Bonnie Honig (Brown University), Odette Lienau (Cornell Law School), Annie McClanahan (UC Irvine), Florence Magnot-Ogilvy (Université de Rennes 2), Catherine Malabou (Kingston University, London and UC Irvine), Eric Santner (University of Chicago), and Joseph Vogl (Humboldt Universität).

    The conference, presented as part of the Economies of Aesthetics Initiative, is co-sponsored by the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3 and Brown University’s Humanities Initiative Programming Fund and the Departments of Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English, French Studies, German Studies, Modern Culture and Media, and Philosophy. This event is free and open to the public.

    Conference, Economies of Aesthetics, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • The tree and the forest is the site of environmental humanities and multidisciplinary inquiry. By engaging the materiality of land, place, and the idea of the tree as knowledge, Macarena Gómez-Barris addresses the forest as a particular site of material and representational evacuation. Extending ideas from her book The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017) on Indigenous aesthetics and social movements, Gómez-Barris considers modes of thinking about archives, counter-visuality, resistance, and recovery that work against the inevitability of the forest’s elimination. Where does the regenerative potential exist that challenges and moves us beyond the paradigm of no future?

    Macarena Gómez-Barris is Professor and Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. She is also Director of the Global South Center (GSC), a research center that works at the intersection of social ecologies, art and politics, and decolonial methodologies. Her instructional focus is on Latinx and Latin American Studies, memory and the afterlives of violence, decolonial theory, the art of social protest, and queer femme epistemes. 

    Gómez-Barris is the author of Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (UC Press, 2009), co-editor with Herman Gray of Towards a Sociology of the Trace (University of Minnesota Press, 2010), The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017) and Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Politics in the Americas (forthcoming UC Press, 2018). 

    Gómez-Barris is series editor, with Diana Taylor, of Dissident Acts, a Duke University Press Series, and was Fulbright Fellow at FLACSO-Quito in Ecuador (2014–15). She is the current co-editor with Marcial Godoy-Anatavia of e-misférica, an online trilingual journal on hemispheric art and politics (NYU). She is also a member of the Social Text journal collective.

    At Pratt Institute, she works with a vibrant community of scholars, activists, intellectuals, and students to find alternatives to the impasses produced by racial and extractive capitalism. 

    This event, presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), is free and open to the public.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Apr
    12
    9:00am - 11:00am

    Environmental Humanities Workshop with Macarena Gómez-Barris

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Registration information forthcoming. Information on the workshop’s location will accompany pre-circulated reading material. Breakfast will be served.

    Macarena Gómez-Barris is Professor and Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. She is also Director of the Global South Center (GSC), a research center that works at the intersection of social ecologies, art and politics, and decolonial methodologies. Her instructional focus is on Latinx and Latin American Studies, memory and the afterlives of violence, decolonial theory, the art of social protest, and queer femme epistemes. 

    Gómez-Barris is the author of Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (UC Press, 2009), co-editor with Herman Gray of Towards a Sociology of the Trace (University of Minnesota Press, 2010), The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017) and Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Politics in the Americas (forthcoming UC Press, 2018). 

    Gómez-Barris is series editor, with Diana Taylor, of Dissident Acts, a Duke University Press Series, and was Fulbright Fellow at FLACSO-Quito in Ecuador (2014–15). She is the current co-editor with Marcial Godoy-Anatavia of e-misférica, an online trilingual journal on hemispheric art and politics (NYU). She is also a member of the Social Text journal collective.

    At Pratt Institute, she works with a vibrant community of scholars, activists, intellectuals, and students to find alternatives to the impasses produced by racial and extractive capitalism. 

    This event, presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB)Macarena Gómez-Barris will also give a public lecture titled “Forest Theory, Occupation, and an Archive of the Future” on Thursday, April 11, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. in Pembroke Hall 305.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Apr
    26
    All Day

    Collaborative Public Workshop

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Public Workshop, held annually in the Spring semester, concludes the Project Development Workshop, the capstone course of the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities. The event features Brown University graduate students and faculty as well as guest speakers. 

    More information forthcoming. 

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • May
    9
    All Day

    Conference • “Theories of Affect”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    More information forthcoming.

    This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative, is free and open to the public. It concludes “Theories of Affect: Poetics of Expression Through and Beyond Identity” (HMAN 2400K), a seminar taught by Daniel Kim and Ada Smailbegovic in the Spring of 2019. 

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities