Upcoming Events

  • Oct
    24

    In 1872, Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote, “Science does not know its debt to imagination,” words that still ring true in the worlds of health and healthcare today. The checklists and clinical algorithms of modern medicine leave little space for imagination, and yet we depend on creativity for the advancement of medicine—to diagnose unusual conditions, to innovate treatment, and to make groundbreaking discoveries. We know a great deal about the empirical aspects of medicine, but we know far less about what the medical imagination is, what it does, how it works, or how we might train it. It was not always so.

    Speaker Sari Altschuler discusses her new book on the history of the medical imagination. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in the United States, doctors understood the imagination to be directly connected to health, intimately involved in healing, and central to medical discovery. Literature in particular provided physicians and other health writers important forms for crafting, testing, and implementing theories of health. Reading and writing poetry trained judgment, cultivated inventiveness, sharpened observation, and supplied evidence for medical research, while novels and short stories offered new perspectives and sites for experimenting with original medical theories. Health research and practice relied on a broader complex of knowing, in which imagination often worked with and alongside observation, experience, and empirical research. In reframing the historical relationship between literature and health, The Medical Imagination provides a usable past for contemporary conversations about the roles of the imagination and the humanities in health research and practice today.

    Sari Altschuler is an assistant professor of English, associate director of the Humanities Center at Northeastern University, and founding director of minor in Health, Humanities, and Society. Her work has appeared in leading journals including American LiteratureAmerican Literary History, PMLA, and the Lancet, and her book The Medical Imagination: Literature and Health in the Early United States was published this year by the University of Pennsylvania Press. Before arriving at Northeastern, she was an assistant professor of English, Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Humanistic Inquiry, and core faculty member at the Center for the Study of Human Health at Emory University.

    This event is part of the Creative Medicine Lecture Series which is co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine.

    Arts, Performance, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Creative Medicine Series, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Oct
    26

    In South Asian art, the distinction between the “secular” and the “religious,” further complicated by the “spiritual,” has been fraught with contestations. In this symposium, art historians, historians, and philosophers examine the entanglement of art history’s categories and practices with the politics of the present. The symposium positions itself at the cusp of two dominant discourses: (i) the lingering Orientalist and nationalist projections that emphasize the “religious” nature of South Asian artistic traditions as against Western secularization; (ii) the assertion of the place of art within the modern secular life of nations, which posits the transitions of objects from earlier religious to new artistic denominations.

    Speakers and Participants: Amanda Anderson, Brown University; Ariella Azoulay, Brown University; Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia University; Iftikhar Dadi, Cornell University; Finbarr Barry Flood, New York University; Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta, and Cogut Institute; Kajri Jain, University of Toronto; Santhi Kavuri-Bauer, San Francisco State University; Sonal Khullar, University of Washington, Seattle; Jinah Kim, Harvard University; Leora Maltz-Leca, Rhode Island School of Design; Saloni Mathur, UCLA; Sumathi Ramaswamy, Duke University; Tamara Sears, Rutgers University; Kavita Singh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi; Foad Torshizi, Rhode Island School of Design; Laura Weinstein, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Karin Zitzewitz, Michigan State University.

    The symposium’s schedule as well as abstracts and speaker bios are available here.

    Co-organized by Tapati Guha-Thakurta and Vazira Zamindar, the symposium is presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its Collaborative Humanities Initiative and by the Center for Contemporary South Asia of the Watson Institute as part of Art History from the South.

    Arts, Performance, Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities in the World, Humanities
  • Oct
    26
    7:00pm

    Gilles Tiberghien • “Paysagisme”

    Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

    Gilles Tiberghien presents the French concept of paysagisme, its main practitioners and relationship to environmental issues. Though the French word paysagisme is usually translated as “landscaping,” “landscape design,” or “landscape architecture,” the field covers much more than that. It incorporates a wide range of land-use issues, including urban planning, public spaces, land reclamation, and ecology, while it also has a pronounced aesthetic element in garden and park design, and overlaps with the important late 20th-century and contemporary art movement known as land art.

    Gilles Tiberghien, agrégé in philosophy, teaches at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne and has written two books on land-based visual arts: Land Art and Nature, Art, Paysage, and has written extensively on contemporary landscape artists and designers.

    This event is free and open to the public. Reception to follow.

    This event is part of the lecture series Paysagisme: Art and Ecological Responsibility organized by Cole Swensen, Professor of Literary Arts. Paysagisme is also a half-credit course (LITR 1151Z) open to undergraduate and graduate students. The series is sponsored by the French Embassy through the Brown University French Center of Excellence, by Brown Arts Initiative, and by the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Read more about the Center of Excellence.

     

    Arts, Performance, Center of Excellence, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Oct
    27

    In South Asian art, the distinction between the “secular” and the “religious,” further complicated by the “spiritual,” has been fraught with contestations. In this symposium, art historians, historians, and philosophers examine the entanglement of art history’s categories and practices with the politics of the present. The symposium positions itself at the cusp of two dominant discourses: (i) the lingering Orientalist and nationalist projections that emphasize the “religious” nature of South Asian artistic traditions as against Western secularization; (ii) the assertion of the place of art within the modern secular life of nations, which posits the transitions of objects from earlier religious to new artistic denominations.

    Speakers and Participants: Amanda Anderson, Brown University; Ariella Azoulay, Brown University; Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia University; Iftikhar Dadi, Cornell University; Finbarr Barry Flood, New York University; Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta, and Cogut Institute; Kajri Jain, University of Toronto; Santhi Kavuri-Bauer, San Francisco State University; Sonal Khullar, University of Washington, Seattle; Jinah Kim, Harvard University; Leora Maltz-Leca, Rhode Island School of Design; Saloni Mathur, UCLA; Sumathi Ramaswamy, Duke University; Tamara Sears, Rutgers University; Kavita Singh, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi; Foad Torshizi, Rhode Island School of Design; Laura Weinstein, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Karin Zitzewitz, Michigan State University.

    The symposium’s schedule as well as abstracts and speaker bios are available here.

    Co-organized by Tapati Guha-Thakurta and Vazira Zamindar, the symposium is presented by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its Collaborative Humanities Initiative and by the Center for Contemporary South Asia of the Watson Institute as part of Art History from the South.

    Arts, Performance, Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities in the World, Humanities
  • Natasha Eaton
    Oct
    30
    4:00pm - 6:00pm

    Natasha Eaton — Decolonial Mimesis in South Asia

    Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs

    Natasha Eaton is Reader in the History of Art. Her research focuses primarily on British and Indian art, notions of cross cultural exchange and material culture. Currently she is at work on several projects – art and indenture in the Indian Ocean; collecting and empire; the agency of light in empire. She has published two monographs – Mimesis across Empires: Artworks and Networks in India, 1765-1860 (Duke University Press, 2013) and Colour, Art and Empire: Visual culture and the nomadism of representation (I.B.Tauris, 2013). She is under contract from Routledge to write a monograph on colonialism, tourism and collecting provisionally titled Vertiginous Exchange. Natasha has published in many peer-reviewed journals including The Art BulletinRESJournal of Material CultureOxford Art Journal, Eighteenth-Century Studies, Cultural Critique. Comparative Studies in Society and HistoryJournal of Historical GeographyMARGLiterature Compass and Third Text. She has been an advisor to and is currently is an editor of the journal Third Text. With Alice Correia she is preparing a special issue of Third Text on Partitions in South Asia scheduled for Autumn 2017. She is also the editor of A Cultural History of Color in the Age of Industry (ed.) Natasha Eaton. Volume 6 (eds.) Carole C. Biggam and Kirsten Wolf (general editors) as part of A Cultural History of Color(Bloomsbury: London and New York).

    Natasha’s research and publications have been generously sponsored by The Leverhulme Trust, the British Academy, Yale University and the Society for Eighteenth-century Studies, Historians of British Art Association, the Paul Mellon Centre, the University of Michigan and the Freer Gallery, the Simon Fellowship at the University of Manchester, the Nehru-V&A Trust, the Getty, the AHRC and UCL. She has organised symposia at the Paul Mellon Centre and Columbia University. Natasha welcomes undergraduate and graduate students with an interest in British art and South Asian visual culture, colour, mimesis, the postcolony and materiality.

    This lecture is part of the Art History From the South Series, which aligns with the Cogut Institute Collaborative Humanities graduate seminar of the same title (HMAN 2400H: Art History from the South: Circulations, Simulations, Transfigurations), as well as the Cogut Institute Collaborative Humanities international symposium entitled How Secular is Art?to be held on October 26-27, 2018. 

    Humanities in the World
  • Nov
    1
    6:00pm

    Panel • “Paysagisme: Art and Ecological Responsibility”

    Studio 2, Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

    Speakers from local communities, including Brown University faculty, discuss work that blends aesthetics, sustainability, and ecological responsibility in a series of brief 10-minute presentations.

    This event is free and open to the public. Reception to follow.

    This event is part of the lecture series Paysagisme: Art and Ecological Responsibility organized by Cole Swensen, Professor of Literary Arts. Paysagisme is also a half-credit course (LITR 1151Z) open to undergraduate and graduate students. The series is sponsored by the French Embassy through the Brown University French Center of Excellence, by Brown Arts Initiative, and by the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Read more about the Center of Excellence.

    Arts, Performance, Center of Excellence, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Nov
    2
    7:00pm

    Gilles Tiberghien • “Land Art”

    McCormack Family Theater, 70 Brown Street

    Gilles Tiberghien presents the largely American movement known as Land Art, both its history and its present.

    Gilles Tiberghien, agrégé in philosophy, teaches at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne and has written two books on land-based visual arts: Land Art and Nature, Art, Paysage, and has written extensively on contemporary landscape artists and designers.

    This event is free and open to the public. Reception to follow.

    This event is part of the lecture series Paysagisme: Art and Ecological Responsibility organized by Cole Swensen, Professor of Literary Arts. Paysagisme is also a half-credit course (LITR 1151Z) open to undergraduate and graduate students. The series is sponsored by the French Embassy through the Brown University French Center of Excellence, by Brown Arts Initiative, and by the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Read more about the Center of Excellence.

    Arts, Performance, Center of Excellence, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Nov
    5
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Info session • Cogut Institute Undergraduate Fellowship

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Passionate about research in the humanities? Come to our info session! Pizza served! 

    If you´ll be a senior honors student in 2019–2020 and are in the humanities or humanistic social sciences, you are eligible to apply for an undergraduate fellowship at the Cogut Institute. Our fellows join a stimulating environment, discussing work-in-progress alongside faculty, postdoc, and graduate student fellows. 

    Attend our info session to learn more about the application process!

    Humanities
  • Nov
    9
    7:00pm

    Antoine Jacobsohn • “Sustainable Gardening”

    Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center for the Creative Arts

    Antoine Jacobsohn discusses the “Potager du Roi,” the King’s vegetable garden, established by Louis XIV at Versailles and currently run as an ongoing experiment in sustainable gardening.

    Antoine Jacobsohn has degrees from Cornell University, Paris 8, and the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris. He is the director of the Potager du Roi, which also houses the École nationale supérieure de paysage, Versailles. He writes on the history of French agriculture and on contemporary movements that advocate “gardening with, not against, nature.”

    This event is free and open to the public. Reception to follow.

    This event is part of the lecture series Paysagisme: Art and Ecological Responsibility organized by Cole Swensen, Professor of Literary Arts. Paysagisme is also a half-credit course (LITR 1151Z) open to undergraduate and graduate students. The series is sponsored by the French Embassy through the Brown University French Center of Excellence, by Brown Arts Initiative, and by the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Read more about the Center of Excellence.

    Arts, Performance, Center of Excellence, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Marble Palace, Calcutta
    Nov
    13
    5:00pm - 7:00pm

    Cross-Cultural Collecting in Early Colonial India

    List Art Building

    Tapati Guha-Thakurta, Visiting Professor of Humanities at Brown University and Professor in History at the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta (CSSSC) will present a lecture entitled, The Object Flows of Empire: Cross-Cultural Collecting in Early Colonial India.

    With its focus on British India of the late 18th and early 19th century, this paper uses the lens of object collecting to reflect on the deep interdependence and enmeshing of cultures that brought together the colonizers and the colonized. It takes up two case studies of private collecting and the building of house museums from the colonial capital, Calcutta – the accumulation of the earliest collection of Hindu temple sculptures by an Irish military officer turned antiquarian, Charles Stuart which brought him the acronym of ‘Hindoo’; and the acquisition of a grand array of neoclassical European sculpture, furniture and art decor by a Bengali merchant-aristocrat, Raja Rajendra Mullick in a Palladian mansion that came to be known as the “Marble Palace”. It wishes to juxtapose the well-known story of the outflow of Indian objects from the colony to the metropolis with the lesser-known scenario of the inflow of a vast, hybrid array of Western objects into the homes of the Indian elite. What would be the changing registers of rights and legitimacies in accessing and the owning of objects? How do new desires of art collecting and museum-making inflect these object flows of empire? What are the unintended destinies and the contingencies of preservation or dispersals that make for the afterlives of these private collections? It is with this set of questions that this paper explores how different pre-histories of the modern institution of the museum are thrown open in colonial Calcutta by General Stuart’s first “Oriental Museum of Hindu Sculptures” and by Rajendralal Mullick’s display of his collection as “India’s first museum of Western art”.

    Arts, Performance, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Nov
    14
    12:30pm - 2:30pm

    PITH — Politics in the Humanities Conversation with George Shulman

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This PITH Conversation with Prof. Shulman, author of “American Prophecy: Race and Redemption in American Political Culture,” is open to graduate students only.  The event location will be announced in the confirmation email to the registrants.  A light lunch will be served at this event.

    To attend the ‘PITH Conversation’ with George Shulman please register at this link

    George Shulman is professor at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University. His research interests lie in the fields of political thought and American studies. He teaches and writes on political thought in Europe and the United States, as well as on Greek and Hebrew — tragic and biblical — traditions. His teaching and writing emphasize the role of narrative in culture and politics. Professor Shulman is a recipient of the 2003 NYU Distinguished Teaching Award. He is the author of Radicalism and Reverence: Gerrard Winstanley and the English Revolution (University of California Press, 1989) and American Prophecy: Race and Redemption in American Political Culture (University of Minnesota Press, 2008), which won the David Easton Prize in political theory. Focusing on the language that great American critics have used to engage the racial domination at the center of American history, American Prophecy explores the relationship of prophecy and race to American nationalism and democratic politics. Professor Shulman edited Radical Future Pasts, which was released by The University Press of Kentucky in July 2014.

    George Shulman will also give a public lecture titled “Fred Moten’s Refusals and Consents: Maternity, Natality and the Politics of Fugitivity” on November 14, 2018 at 5:30PM in Pembroke Hall 305. These events are presented as part of the PITH — Politics in the Humanities series.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH
  • The paper situates the recent work of Fred Moten in two conversations. One conversation is focused on “the black radical tradition,” in which Moten places his “avowedly anti-political romance” with a fugitive black sociality radically opposed to any organized form of politics. How do other voices in this tradition validate — and problematize — his view of an inherent antagonism between black fugitivity, and a democratic politics inescapably tied to the unthought premises of anti-black, settler colonial modernity? A second conversation involves radically democratic voices in political theory, for Moten directly criticizes Hannah Arendt’s work, and his argument also suggests a fruitful engagement with Sheldon Wolin. Each offers a catastrophic account of modernity, criticizes politics as bio-political sovereignty, and defends a “revolutionary treasure” that each deems fugitive. Each also offers, however, contrasting accounts of pariah invisibility, natality, and public disclosure on the one hand, and of commonality, scale, and insurgency on the other hand. Whereas agonistic theorists typically modify how Arendt or Wolin conceive and conjure the political, as if to redeem it, Moten insists that any conception of the political — no matter how modified — necessarily entails “counter-insurgency” against the sociality he equates with blackness and maternity. Tracing intersections and tensions between voices of black radicalism and of radical democracy, we complicate figurations of fugitivity, natality, and commonality, and open inherited conceptions of the political to risk and reworking.

    George Shulman is professor at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University. His research interests lie in the fields of political thought and American studies. He teaches and writes on political thought in Europe and the United States, as well as on Greek and Hebrew—tragic and biblical—traditions. His teaching and writing emphasize the role of narrative in culture and politics. Professor Shulman is a recipient of the 2003 NYU Distinguished Teaching Award. He is the author of Radicalism and Reverence: Gerrard Winstanley and the English Revolution (University of California Press, 1989) and American Prophecy: Race and Redemption in American Political Culture (University of Minnesota Press, 2008), which won the David Easton Prize in political theory. Focusing on the language that great American critics have used to engage the racial domination at the center of American history, American Prophecy explores the relationship of prophecy and race to American nationalism and democratic politics. Professor Shulman edited Radical Future Pasts, which was released by The University Press of Kentucky in July 2014.

    George Shulman will also have a PITH Conversation with Brown graduate students on November 14, 2018 at 12:30PM in Pembroke Hall. These events are presented as part of the PITH — Politics in the Humanities series.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH, Social Sciences
  • On the climate front, events are moving from bad to worse with alarming speed. With fossil fueled neo-liberalism hurtling towards climate chaos and authoritarian populisms, where is there room for hope? In this talk, Damian White reflects on the contributions that mobilizations concern with just transitions running alongside a vibrant explosion of interest in design for transitions might make for re-grounding a political ecology of hope in dangerous times. The just transition is a concept that has its roots in the labor movement. Of late, it has been adopted by a broader array of forces: from democratic socialists to environmental and racial justice advocates, from feminists to decolonial-indigenous forces as a means of thinking about the political strategies and alliance building for moving post-carbon transitions forward. The emerging field of design for transitions equally is attempting to draw a broad range of design activists, radical municipalists, peer to peer hackers, commoners and others to think about the platforms, prototypes, cultural and design interventions that could aggregate multiple modes of redirective practice that could be unleashed to build post-carbon futures. At present, these currents often talk past each other. This paper explores tensions and conflicts emerging within both fields. It also reflects on the spaces for further engagement. There are of course no quick fixes or easy solutions to our climate crisis. But it is suggested that a post-carbon politics that is experimental, iterative and inventive in its outlook, marked by a degree of democratic maker-ly ambition and a post-carbon politics that foregrounds the potential creativity of labor has much to recommend itself.

    Damian White is Professor of Social Theory and the Environment and Dean of Liberal Arts at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is the author of Bookchin: A Critical Appraisal (2008); Environments, Natures and Social Theory: Towards a Critical Hybridity (2016) and the co-editor of Technonatures (2009) and Autonomy, Solidarity, Possibility: The Colin Ward Reader (2011).

    Damian White will also lead an Environmental Humanities breakfast workshop on November 16, 2018 from 9am to 11am, that is open to Brown students and faculty by registration only.  These events are presented as part of the Environmental Humanities Initiative.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Nov
    16
    9:00am - 11:00am

    Environmental Humanities Workshop with Damian White

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    To attend the ‘Environmental Humanities’ workshop with Damian White please register at this link.

    Information on workshop location will accompany pre-circulated reading material. Breakfast will be served at this workshop.

    Damian White is Professor of Social Theory and the Environment and Dean of Liberal Arts at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is the author of Bookchin: A Critical Appraisal (2008); Environments, Natures and Social Theory: Towards a Critical Hybridity (2016) and the co-editor of Technonatures (2009) and Autonomy, Solidarity, Possibility: The Colin Ward Reader (2011).

    Damian White will also give a public lecture titled “Just Transitions, transition design and radical hope: For a post-carbon politics beyond technocratic ecomodernism and the it’s-too-late-o-cene” on Thursday, November 15, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. in Pembroke Hall 305.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • In 1825, Ludwig van Beethoven, recovering from illness, composed music for two violins, viola, and cello that he titled “Holy song of thanks to the Deity from a convalescent, in the Lydian mode” (Heiliger Dankgesang eines Genesenen an die Gottheit, in der lydischen Tonart). The piece became the third movement of his String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Op. 132. In this talk with musical excerpts, speaker Brian Alverson offers an account of the circumstances in which Beethoven found himself and a reading of the movement as a reflection on end-of-life experience. Members of the Newport String Project featuring EmmaLee Holmes-Hicks and Ealain McMullin violins, Jesse Holstein, viola, and Heath Marlow, cello, will give a performance of the movement.

    Brian Alverson, MD is Director of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Hasbro Children’s Hospital and Professor of Pediatrics at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

    Based in Newport, RI, the Newport String Project combines music performance with youth mentoring to build a community that crosses boundaries of generation, heritage, and economic circumstances through access to inspiring musical experiences for all. More information at http://www.newportstringproject.org/

    This event is part of the Creative Medicine Lecture Series which is co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine.

    Arts, Performance, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Creative Medicine Series, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Dec
    7
    All Day

    Conference • “Political Concepts: The Science Edition”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The annual conference of the Political Concepts Initiative will be dedicated to analyzing the contemporary conditions of knowledge production, with a focus on the sciences and the university.

    Speakers present a single concept, one that needs to be revised, deconstructed, or invented in order to better understand, criticize, and, if necessary resist recent changes in the organization of scientific knowledge – and academic knowledge more broadly. This concept is a tool for a critical explication of ways in which scientific knowledges have been impacted by, and integrated into the neoliberal economy and global order, the forces that have eroded liberal democratic regimes and brought about the disintegration of the common, as well as the struggles for decolonization, democracy and social justice. Presentations question, first, the ways these processes, forces, and struggles work through the sciences and transform the inner fabric of scientific research and academic practice, and second, how science itself has been shaped as an arena of political struggle.

    Friday, December 7
    8:45 AM – 9:00 AM Greetings and Opening Remarks
    9:00 AM – 12:00 AM Anne Fausto Sterling • Truth
    Stephanie Dick • Database
    Dan Hirschman • Stylized Facts
    Moderator: Amanda Anderson
    11:20 AM – 11:40 AM Coffee Break
    11:40 AM – 1:30 PM Raphael Sassower • Scientific Progress
    Tamara Chin • Homo Geoeconomicus
    Moderator: Sharon Krause
    1:30 PM – 3:00 PM Lunch Break
    3:00 PM – 4:50 PM Alex Csiszar • Peer Review
    Kaushik Sunder Rajan • Value
    Moderator: Adi Ophir
    4:50 PM – 5:10 PM Coffee Break
    5:10 PM – 7:00 PM Rebecca Nedostup • Practice/Praxis
    Barbara Herrnstein Smith • Scientism
    Moderator: Etienne Balibar
       
    Saturday, December 8
    9:10 AM – 11:00 AM Etienne Benson • Environment
    Joanna Radin • Future
    Moderator: Tim Bewes
    11:00 AM – 11:20 AM Coffee Break
    11:20 AM – 1:10 PM Mara Mills • Impairment
    Iris Montero • Scala Naturae
    Moderator: Leela Gandhi
    1:10 PM – 2:40 PM Lunch Break
    2:40 PM – 4:30 PM Banu Subramaniam • Diaspora/e
    Suman Seth • Race
    Moderator: Lukas Rieppel
    4:30 PM – 4:50 PM Coffee Break
    4:50 PM – 6:40 PM Yarden Katz • Entrepreneurial Science
    Peter Galison and Noah Feldman • Corporatized Knowledge
    Moderator: Jacques Lezra

    The event is free and open to the public.

    This conference is funded in part by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureship, the CV Starr Foundation Lectureship, the Humanities Initiative Programming Fund, and the Program in Science, Technologies, and Society.

    Conference, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative, Social Sciences
  • Dec
    8
    All Day

    Conference • “Political Concepts: The Science Edition”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The annual conference of the Political Concepts Initiative will be dedicated to analyzing the contemporary conditions of knowledge production, with a focus on the sciences and the university.

    Speakers present a single concept, one that needs to be revised, deconstructed, or invented in order to better understand, criticize, and, if necessary resist recent changes in the organization of scientific knowledge – and academic knowledge more broadly. This concept is a tool for a critical explication of ways in which scientific knowledges have been impacted by, and integrated into the neoliberal economy and global order, the forces that have eroded liberal democratic regimes and brought about the disintegration of the common, as well as the struggles for decolonization, democracy and social justice. Presentations question, first, the ways these processes, forces, and struggles work through the sciences and transform the inner fabric of scientific research and academic practice, and second, how science itself has been shaped as an arena of political struggle.

    Friday, December 7
    8:45 AM – 9:00 AM Greetings and Opening Remarks
    9:00 AM – 12:00 AM Anne Fausto Sterling • Truth
    Stephanie Dick • Database
    Dan Hirschman • Stylized Facts
    Moderator: Amanda Anderson
    11:20 AM – 11:40 AM Coffee Break
    11:40 AM – 1:30 PM Raphael Sassower • Scientific Progress
    Tamara Chin • Homo Geoeconomicus
    Moderator: Sharon Krause
    1:30 PM – 3:00 PM Lunch Break
    3:00 PM – 4:50 PM Alex Csiszar • Peer Review
    Kaushik Sunder Rajan • Value
    Moderator: Adi Ophir
    4:50 PM – 5:10 PM Coffee Break
    5:10 PM – 7:00 PM Rebecca Nedostup • Practice/Praxis
    Barbara Herrnstein Smith • Scientism
    Moderator: Etienne Balibar
       
    Saturday, December 8
    9:10 AM – 11:00 AM Etienne Benson • Environment
    Joanna Radin • Future
    Moderator: Tim Bewes
    11:00 AM – 11:20 AM Coffee Break
    11:20 AM – 1:10 PM Mara Mills • Impairment
    Iris Montero • Scala Naturae
    Moderator: Leela Gandhi
    1:10 PM – 2:40 PM Lunch Break
    2:40 PM – 4:30 PM Banu Subramaniam • Diaspora/e
    Suman Seth • Race
    Moderator: Lukas Rieppel
    4:30 PM – 4:50 PM Coffee Break
    4:50 PM – 6:40 PM Yarden Katz • Entrepreneurial Science
    Peter Galison and Noah Feldman • Corporatized Knowledge
    Moderator: Jacques Lezra

    The event is free and open to the public.

    This conference is funded in part by the Herbert H. Goldberger Lectureship, the CV Starr Foundation Lectureship, the Humanities Initiative Programming Fund, and the Program in Science, Technologies, and Society.

    Conference, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative, Social Sciences
  • Jan
    31
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Joyce Chaplin • Lecture in Environmental Humanities • Title tba

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Joyce Chaplin is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History in the Department of History at Harvard University, where she teaches the histories of science, climate, colonialism, and environment. She is also an Affiliated Faculty Member in Harvard’s Department of the History of Science, an affiliate of the Department of Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, a Faculty Member of Harvard’s American Studies Program, and a Faculty Associate of the Harvard University Center for the Environment where she is a convener of the Harvard Environmental History Working Group

     

    More information about this event will be posted soon.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Apr
    4
    All Day

    Pico Iyer • Lecture and Book Signing

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Event times will be determined.

    Pico Iyer, “arguably the world’s greatest living travel writer” according to Outside magazine, is the author of two novels and several works of nonfiction, including The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. Iyer’s first book, Video Night in Kathmandu, was completed while he was still working as a world affairs writer for Time. It chronicled his explorations across ten countries in Asia and the way these lands have been affected—or not—by the influence of Western culture.

    Iyer, drawing from decades of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama, also authored the bestselling book The Open Road, which The New York Times Book Review called a “trenchant, impassioned look at a singular life.” Iyer’s newest book, Autumn Light, out in April 2019, is a meditation on impermanence, mortality, and grief informed by his more than 30 years of living in Japan. A very different yet complementary work, A Beginner’s Guide to Japan, will also appear in 2019, a few months before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Iyer recently gave three TED Talks that, together, earned eight million views and complemented his 2014 book, The Art of Stillness. His books have been translated into more than 20 languages. He has written liner notes for Leonard Cohen, a film script for Miramax, a libretto for a chamber orchestra, and the introductions to more than 60 other works. He regularly writes on literature for The New York Review of Books; on travel for The Financial Times; and on global culture and news for TimeThe New York Times, and magazines around the world.

    Iyer was born in Oxford, England to parents from India. He was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and earned master’s degrees from Oxford and Harvard as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. This Spring 2019, he is a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton.

    For more information on Pico Iyer, please visit picoiyerjourneys.com.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    5
    All Day

    Pico Iyer • Undergraduate Conversation

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This conversation with Pico Iyer is for undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event.  Event times and location will be determined.

    Pico Iyer, “arguably the world’s greatest living travel writer” according to Outside magazine, is the author of two novels and several works of nonfiction, including The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. Iyer’s first book, Video Night in Kathmandu, was completed while he was still working as a world affairs writer for Time. It chronicled his explorations across ten countries in Asia and the way these lands have been affected—or not—by the influence of Western culture.

    Iyer, drawing from decades of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama, also authored the bestselling book The Open Road, which The New York Times Book Review called a “trenchant, impassioned look at a singular life.” Iyer’s newest book, Autumn Light, out in April 2019, is a meditation on impermanence, mortality, and grief informed by his more than 30 years of living in Japan. A very different yet complementary work, A Beginner’s Guide to Japan, will also appear in 2019, a few months before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Iyer recently gave three TED Talks that, together, earned eight million views and complemented his 2014 book, The Art of Stillness. His books have been translated into more than 20 languages. He has written liner notes for Leonard Cohen, a film script for Miramax, a libretto for a chamber orchestra, and the introductions to more than 60 other works. He regularly writes on literature for The New York Review of Books; on travel for The Financial Times; and on global culture and news for TimeThe New York Times, and magazines around the world.

    Iyer was born in Oxford, England to parents from India. He was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and earned master’s degrees from Oxford and Harvard as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. This Spring 2019, he is a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton.

    For more information on Pico Iyer, please visit picoiyerjourneys.com.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    11

    Macarena Gómez-Barris is Professor and Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. She is also Director of the Global South Center (GSC), a research center that works at the intersection of social ecologies, art / politics, and decolonial methodologies. Her instructional focus is on Latinx and Latin American Studies, memory and the afterlives of violence, decolonial theory, the art of social protest, and queer femme epistemes. 

    Macarena is author of Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (2009), co-editor with Herman Gray of Towards a Sociology of the Trace (2010), The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (2017) and Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Politics in the Americas (forthcoming UC Press, 2018). 

    Gómez-Barris is series editor, with Diana Taylor, of Dissident Acts, a Duke University Press Series, and was Fulbright Fellow at FLACSO-Quito in Ecuador (2014–15). She is the current co-editor with Marcial Godoy-Anatavia of e-misférica, an online trilingual journal on hemispheric art and politics (NYU). And, she is a member of the Social Text journal collective.

    At Pratt Institute, she works with a vibrant community of scholars, activists, intellectuals, and students to find alternatives to the impasses produced by racial and extractive capitalism. 

     

    More information about this event will be posted soon.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities