Upcoming Events

  • Spenser, in his “Epithalamion,” invokes two figures from classical antiquity who bore children for Jove. Why Spenser invokes Maia and Alcmene, who lay with Jove against their will, is one question to be explored; another is why Spenser suggests that Jove has also lain with his own bride, Elizabeth. When we consider, however, that these unions produced Hermes and Hercules, the picture becomes clearer: Spenser is focused not on Elizabeth’s consent, but on her bearing an extraordinary heir. This de-emphasis on the erotics of love in favor of the exigency of procreation is the central legacy of Spenser’s poem for Donne’s “Epithalamion Made at Lincoln’s Inn” which dispenses altogether with the bride’s pleasure: she is a “pleasing sacrifice.” This paper will bring the myths of Maia and Alcmene into conversation with Spenser and Donne’s “Epithalamia” in order to reconsider the fate of this peculiar genre in Renaissance poetry.

    Ramie Targoff is Professor of English at Brandeis University. She teaches and studies Renaissance literature, with an emphasis on the relationship between literature and religion. She has written books on the invention of common prayer and its influence on Renaissance devotional poetry, on the works of the poet and preacher John Donne, and on Renaissance love poetry. Her newest book, Renaissance Woman: The Life of Vittoria Colonna (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018), is a biography of the sixteenth-century Italian poet.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World , is free and open to the public. 

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • Lecture and Book Signing

    Pico Iyer, “arguably the world’s greatest living travel writer” according to Outside magazine, is the author of two novels and several works of nonfiction, including The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. Iyer’s first book, Video Night in Kathmandu, was completed while he was still working as a world affairs writer for Time. It chronicled his explorations across ten countries in Asia and the way these lands have been affected—or not—by the influence of Western culture.

    Iyer, drawing from decades of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama, also authored the bestselling book The Open Road, which The New York Times Book Review called a “trenchant, impassioned look at a singular life.” Iyer’s newest book, Autumn Light, out in April 2019, is a meditation on impermanence, mortality, and grief informed by his more than 30 years of living in Japan. A very different yet complementary work, A Beginner’s Guide to Japan, will also appear in 2019, a few months before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Iyer recently gave three TED Talks that, together, earned eight million views and complemented his 2014 book, The Art of Stillness. His books have been translated into more than 20 languages. He has written liner notes for Leonard Cohen, a film script for Miramax, a libretto for a chamber orchestra, and the introductions to more than 60 other works. He regularly writes on literature for The New York Review of Books; on travel for The Financial Times; and on global culture and news for TimeThe New York Times, and magazines around the world.

    Iyer was born in Oxford, England to parents from India. He was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and earned master’s degrees from Oxford and Harvard as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. This Spring 2019, he is a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton.

    For more information on Pico Iyer, please visit picoiyerjourneys.com .

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series  of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    5
    All Day

    Conference • “Narratives of Debt”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Narratives of Debt gathers key thinkers in contemporary critical theory to explore the question of debt in an interdisciplinary perspective, ranging from the history of slavery to psychoanalysis, from literature to financial capitalism, from philosophy to cryptocurrencies. The conference is committed to examining the various ways of narrating—witnessing—the condition of being indebted and the historical rise of indebtedness as a mode of governance (each narrative entailing decisions about justice, ethics, politics). Debt itself is also considered as a narrative, i.e., a performative fiction that organizes time by linking past, present, and future in a diegetic chain. Money, if we define it with Deleuze and Guattari as “the means for rendering the debt infinite,” constitutes the backdrop of this economic narratology.

    Co-organized by Peter Szendy (Brown University) and Emmanuel Bouju (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle and Institut Universitaire de France), the conference features scholars from a broad range of fields. Speakers include Arjun Appadurai (New York University), Jennifer Baker (New York University), Anthony Bogues (Brown University), Raphaëlle Guidée (Université de Poitiers), Bonnie Honig (Brown University), Odette Lienau (Cornell Law School), Annie McClanahan (University of California/Irvine), Florence Magnot-Ogilvy (Université de Rennes 2), Catherine Malabou (Kingston University, London and University of California/Irvine), Eric Santner (University of Chicago), and Joseph Vogl (Humboldt Universität).

    Full schedule  available on the website of the Cogut Institute.

    Friday, April 5, 2019
    9:15 am – 9:30 am Opening Words
    9:30 am – 11:00 am Emmanuel Bouju , Université Sorbonne Nouvelle and Institut Universitaire de France • “Narratives of Debt: An Introduction (On Credit)”
    Annie McClanahan , UC/Irvine• “Bodies Economic: Disease, Decay, and the Discourse of Stagnation”
    11:30 am – 1:00 pm Florence Magnot-Ogilvy , Université de Rennes 2 • “The Unreliable Debtor: Complexity and Shadows of the Narrative of Debt in the Eighteenth-Century French ‘Romans de Parvenus’”
    Frederik Tygstrup , University of Copenhagen • “Topologies of Debt”
    2:30 pm – 4:00 pm Odette Lienau , Cornell University • “Sovereign Debt, Private Wealth: Vultures, Thieves, and the Contingency of Legal Strategy”
    Anthony Bogues , Brown University • “How Much Is Your African Slave Worth? Wills, Debt, and the Enslaved Black Body as ‘Property in Person’”
    4:30 pm – 6:00 pm Raphaëlle Guidée , Université de Poitiers • “The Utopia of Bankruptcy”
    Arjun Appadurai , New York University • “Life After Debt”
     
    Saturday, April 6, 2019
    9:30 am – 11:00 am Jennifer Baker , New York University • “Emerson’s Debts: Quotation and Originality”
    Patricia Ybarra , Brown University • “The Theatrical History of Debt: Preliminary Inquiries”
    11:30 am – 1:00 pm Bonnie Honig , Brown University • “Is Man a ‘Sabbatical Animal?’ Agamben, Rosenzweig, Heschel, Arendt”
    Eric Santner , University of Chicago • “A Critique of Mana-Theism”
    2:30 pm – 4:00 pm Catherine Malabou , Kingston University and UC/Irvine • “Earning to Give: the Debt of Effective Altruism”
    Peter Szendy , Brown University • “Narration and Solvency”
    5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Joseph Vogl , Humboldt Universität and Princeton University • “Ascendancy of Finance: Toward a Concept of ‘Seigniorial’ Power

    The conference, presented as part of the Economies of Aesthetics Initiative , is co-sponsored by the Institut Universitaire de France and the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Brown University’s Humanities Initiative Programming Fund, the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and the Departments of Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English, French Studies, German Studies, Modern Culture and Media, and Philosophy. This event is free and open to the public.

    Conference, Economies of Aesthetics, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Apr
    5
    9:30am - 11:00am

    Undergraduate Seminar with Pico Iyer

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Register >  

    This conversation with Pico Iyer is for undergraduate students only. Registered participants will receive short reading materials as well as the location of the seminar. 

    Pico Iyer, “arguably the world’s greatest living travel writer” according to Outside magazine, is the author of two novels and several works of nonfiction, including The Lady and the Monk and The Global Soul. Iyer’s first book, Video Night in Kathmandu, was completed while he was still working as a world affairs writer for Time. It chronicled his explorations across ten countries in Asia and the way these lands have been affected—or not—by the influence of Western culture.

    Iyer, drawing from decades of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama, also authored the bestselling book The Open Road, which The New York Times Book Review called a “trenchant, impassioned look at a singular life.” Iyer’s newest book, Autumn Light, out in April 2019, is a meditation on impermanence, mortality, and grief informed by his more than 30 years of living in Japan. A very different yet complementary work, A Beginner’s Guide to Japan, will also appear in 2019, a few months before the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Iyer recently gave three TED Talks that, together, earned eight million views and complemented his 2014 book, The Art of Stillness. His books have been translated into more than 20 languages. He has written liner notes for Leonard Cohen, a film script for Miramax, a libretto for a chamber orchestra, and the introductions to more than 60 other works. He regularly writes on literature for The New York Review of Books; on travel for The Financial Times; and on global culture and news for TimeThe New York Times, and magazines around the world.

    Iyer was born in Oxford, England to parents from India. He was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and earned master’s degrees from Oxford and Harvard as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters. This Spring 2019, he is a Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton.

    For more information on Pico Iyer, please visit picoiyerjourneys.com .

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series  of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    6
    All Day

    Conference • “Narratives of Debt”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Narratives of Debt gathers key thinkers in contemporary critical theory to explore the question of debt in an interdisciplinary perspective, ranging from the history of slavery to psychoanalysis, from literature to financial capitalism, from philosophy to cryptocurrencies. The conference is committed to examining the various ways of narrating—witnessing—the condition of being indebted and the historical rise of indebtedness as a mode of governance (each narrative entailing decisions about justice, ethics, politics). Debt itself is also considered as a narrative, i.e., a performative fiction that organizes time by linking past, present, and future in a diegetic chain. Money, if we define it with Deleuze and Guattari as “the means for rendering the debt infinite,” constitutes the backdrop of this economic narratology.

    Co-organized by Peter Szendy (Brown University) and Emmanuel Bouju (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3), the conference features scholars from a broad range of fields. Speakers include Arjun Appadurai (New York University), Jennifer Baker (New York University), Anthony Bogues (Brown University), Raphaëlle Guidée (Université de Poitiers), Bonnie Honig (Brown University), Odette Lienau (Cornell Law School), Annie McClanahan (UC Irvine), Florence Magnot-Ogilvy (Université de Rennes 2), Catherine Malabou (Kingston University, London and UC Irvine), Eric Santner (University of Chicago), and Joseph Vogl (Humboldt Universität).

    Full schedule available on the website of the Cogut Institute.

    Saturday, April 6, 2019
    9:30 am – 11:00 am Jennifer Baker , New York University • “Emerson’s Debts: Quotation and Originality”
    Patricia Ybarra , Brown University • “The Theatrical History of Debt: Preliminary Inquiries”
    11:30 am – 1:00 pm Bonnie Honig , Brown University • “Is Man a ‘Sabbatical Animal?’ Agamben, Rosenzweig, Heschel, Arendt”
    Eric Santner , University of Chicago • “A Critique of Mana-Theism”
    2:30 pm – 4:00 pm Catherine Malabou , Kingston University and University of California at Irvine • “Earning to Give: the Debt of Effective Altruism”
    Peter Szendy , Brown University • “Narration and Solvency”
    5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Joseph Vogl , Humboldt Universität and Princeton University • “Ascendancy of Finance: Toward a Concept of ‘Seigniorial’ Power

    The conference, presented as part of the Economies of Aesthetics Initiative , is co-sponsored by the Institut Universitaire de France, the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3, Brown University’s Humanities Initiative Programming Fund, and the Departments of Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English, French Studies, German Studies, Modern Culture and Media, and Philosophy. This event is free and open to the public.

    Conference, Economies of Aesthetics, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • The tree and the forest is the site of environmental humanities and multidisciplinary inquiry. By engaging the materiality of land, place, and the idea of the tree as knowledge, Macarena Gómez-Barris addresses the forest as a particular site of material and representational evacuation. Extending ideas from her book The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017) on Indigenous aesthetics and social movements, Gómez-Barris considers modes of thinking about archives, counter-visuality, resistance, and recovery that work against the inevitability of the forest’s elimination. Where does the regenerative potential exist that challenges and moves us beyond the paradigm of no future?

    Macarena Gómez-Barris is Professor and Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. She is also Director of the Global South Center (GSC), a research center that works at the intersection of social ecologies, art and politics, and decolonial methodologies. Her instructional focus is on Latinx and Latin American Studies, memory and the afterlives of violence, decolonial theory, the art of social protest, and queer femme epistemes. 

    Gómez-Barris is the author of Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (UC Press, 2009), co-editor with Herman Gray of Towards a Sociology of the Trace (University of Minnesota Press, 2010), The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017) and Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Politics in the Americas (University of California Press, 2018). 

    Gómez-Barris is series editor, with Diana Taylor, of Dissident Acts, a Duke University Press Series, and was Fulbright Fellow at FLACSO-Quito in Ecuador (2014–15). She is the current co-editor with Marcial Godoy-Anatavia of e-misférica, an online trilingual journal on hemispheric art and politics (NYU). She is also a member of the Social Text journal collective.

    At Pratt Institute, she works with a vibrant community of scholars, activists, intellectuals, and students to find alternatives to the impasses produced by racial and extractive capitalism. 

    Free and open to the public. This event is presented by the Environmental Humanities Initiative and co-sponsored by the C.V. Starr Lectureship Fund, the Watson Institute, the Departments of History and Religious Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, and the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Apr
    12
    9:00am - 10:30am

    Environmental Humanities Workshop with Macarena Gómez-Barris

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Register >. (You must be logged into your Brown University email account.) Information on the workshop’s location will accompany pre-circulated reading material excerpted from The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017). Breakfast will be served.

    Macarena Gómez-Barris is Professor and Chairperson of Social Science and Cultural Studies at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. She is also Director of the Global South Center (GSC), a research center that works at the intersection of social ecologies, art and politics, and decolonial methodologies. Her instructional focus is on Latinx and Latin American Studies, memory and the afterlives of violence, decolonial theory, the art of social protest, and queer femme epistemes. 

    Gómez-Barris is the author of Where Memory Dwells: Culture and State Violence in Chile (UC Press, 2009), co-editor with Herman Gray of Towards a Sociology of the Trace (University of Minnesota Press, 2010), The Extractive Zone: Social Ecologies and Decolonial Perspectives (Duke University Press, 2017) and Beyond the Pink Tide: Art and Politics in the Americas (University of California Press, 2018). 

    Gómez-Barris is series editor, with Diana Taylor, of Dissident Acts, a Duke University Press Series, and was Fulbright Fellow at FLACSO-Quito in Ecuador (2014–15). She is the current co-editor with Marcial Godoy-Anatavia of e-misférica, an online trilingual journal on hemispheric art and politics (NYU). She is also a member of the Social Text journal collective.

    At Pratt Institute, she works with a vibrant community of scholars, activists, intellectuals, and students to find alternatives to the impasses produced by racial and extractive capitalism. 

    Macarena Gómez-Barris will also give a public lecture titled “Forest Theory, Occupation, and an Archive of the Future ” on Thursday, April 11, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. in Pembroke Hall 305.

    This event is presented by the Environmental Humanities Initiative and co-sponsored by the C.V. Starr Lectureship Fund, the Watson Institute, the Departments of History and Religious Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, and the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • As an aesthetic form, lyric poetry has an intricate, jewel-like specificity: its linguistic play, formal innovations, and personal address have made it appear deeply rooted in particular, personal contexts, difficult to translate, its nuances perhaps near-impossible to grasp across deep cultural divides. And yet, at the same time, lyric also makes claims to the universal, speaking of timeless themes that defy historical contingencies, and seeking, ostensibly, to engage our most fundamental human feelings. This paradox — a staple of debates in studies of the lyric — takes on greater stakes when juxtaposed with the recent critical turn towards the Global Renaissance: can we speak of a “global lyric studies” of the early modern period, and why might we want to do so? What might such a thing look like? Can we usefully discuss lyric traditions in Europe and South Asia alongside each other, or are the particular literary and linguistic histories of these regions too disparate to make the comparison worthwhile? This talk explores some of the methodological, philosophical, and political challenges that plague cross-cultural studies of the lyric and suggests some avenues for future research. It considers why poetry (lyric in particular) has seemed resistant to historicism and asks how we might align aesthetic and historical considerations across geographies while studying distinctive artistic practices. In the process, Ramachandran explores a multifaceted understanding of the lyric — from the material cultures of lyric production and dissemination, its performance and transmission across different audiences, to its philosophic claims and ethical function.

    A literary critic and cultural historian of early modern Europe, Ayesha Ramachandran is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Yale University. Her first book, The Worldmakers (University of Chicago Press, 2015), charts transnational encounters and the early mechanisms of globalization from the late fifteenth to the early eighteenth centuries. It was awarded the MLA’s Scaglione prize in Comparative Literary Studies (2017), the Milton Society of America’s Shawcross Prize for the best book chapter on Milton (2016), and the Sixteenth Century Studies Association’s Founder’s Prize for the best first book manuscript (2015). Her interests, beyond the English, French, and Italian literary traditions, extend to Portuguese, Spanish, and Neo-Latin materials and more recently, with the support of a Mellon New Directions Fellowship (2016), to Persian and early modern South Asia. Her current book project, Lyric Thinking: Humanism, Selfhood, Modernity, argues for the central importance of lyric form and language in shaping new intellectual possibilities for the self in the early modern period and beyond. Moving from Petrarch to Descartes, while also considering their afterlives in modernist writing, it draws together scholarship on theories of mind, cognition, and meditation with a complex literary history of lyric’s foundational encounters with other genres, particularly the epic.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World , is free and open to the public. 

    Early Modern World, Humanities
  • Apr
    26
    All Day

    Collaborative Public Workshop

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Public Workshop concludes the first offering of the capstone seminar for the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities . The seminar, HMAN 2500: Project Development Workshop, is taught this Spring 2019 by Amanda Anderson, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Humanities and English, and Tamara Chin, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and East Asian Studies.

    Over the course of the semester, participants in the seminar have developed and workshopped a paper central to their core doctoral work. In addition, all participants have performed a number of diverse roles: they have nominated and then introduced a text that was formative for their scholarly development; they have served as first questioners for papers workshopped by others; and they have interviewed one of their peers and prepared a formal introduction of their work. The course provides training for roles that are crucial to the form and quality of academic and public life but that are seldom an object of study and practice in themselves.

    The conference features talks by anthropologist Rosalind Morris (Columbia University) and political scientist Corey Robin (Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate Center) as well as Brown University graduate students Chris DiBona (Religious Studies), Aaron Jacobs (History), Nechama Juni (Religious Studies), Irina Kalinka (Modern Culture and Media), Pedro Lopes de Almeida (Portuguese and Brazilian Studies), Stephen Marsh (English), Caleb Murray (Religious Studies), N’Kosi Oates (Africana Studies), Urszula Rutkowska (English) and Jan Tabor (German Studies).

    Brown University faculty Melvin Rogers, Associate Professor of Political Science, and Ellen Rooney, Royce Family Professor of Teaching Excellence in English and Modern Culture and Media, serve as respondents along with Rosalind Morris and Corey Robin.

    This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative , is free and open to the public.

    Faculty Bios

    Amanda Anderson is Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities and Andrew W. Mellon Professor of English and Humanities. Her research focuses on 19th- and 20th-century literature and culture, addressing broad questions of intellectual history, disciplinary formation, and the relations among literature, moral life, and politics. She is the author of Psyche and Ethos: Moral Life after Psychology (Oxford University Press, 2018), Bleak Liberalism (University of Chicago Press, 2016), The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Cultures of Theory (Princeton University Press, 2006) among other works.

    Tamara Chin, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and East Asian Studies, works on comparative approaches to the ancient world and to historical narrative, with a focus on early Chinese texts, the Afro-Eurasian ‘Silk Road,’ and the modern politics of antiquity. Her first book, Savage Exchange: Han Imperialism, Chinese Literary Style, and the Economic Imagination (Harvard University Press, 2014) received the Harry Levin Prize of the American Comparative Literature Association.

    Rosalind C. Morris is Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. She is the author of The Returns of Fetishism: Charles de Brosses’s The Worship of Fetish Gods and its Legacies (with Daniel Leonard; University of Chicago Press, 2017), Accounts and Drawings from Underground: East Rand Proprietary Mines, 1906 (with William Kentridge; University of Chicago Press, 2014) and In the Place of Origins: Modernity and its Mediums in Northern Thailand (Duke University Press, 2000). Her research addresses the relationships between value and violence, aesthetics and the political, the sexualization of power and desire, and the history of anthropological thought and social theory. Morris has served as Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Associate Director of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, and co-editor of CONNECT: art, politics, theory, culture.

    Corey Robin is Professor of Political Science at Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate Center and author of The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Donald Trump (Oxford University Press, 2011, 2018) and Fear: The History of a Political Idea (Oxford University Press, 2006), which won the Best First Book in Political Theory Award from the American Political Science Association. Hailed as “the quintessential public intellectual for the digital age” (The New York Times), Robin is currently a Cullman Fellow at the New York Public Library, where he is finishing his next book The Enigma of Clarence Thomas, which will be out in September.

    Melvin Rogers, Associate Professor of Political Science and author of The Undiscovered Dewey: Religion, Morality, and the Ethos of Democracy (Columbia University Press, 2008) and co-editor of African American Political Thought: A Collected History (University of Chicago Press, Forthcoming). His articles appear in major academic journals as well as popular venues such as Dissent, The Atlantic, Public Seminar, and Boston Review. Rogers serves as the co-editor of the New Histories of Philosophy series at Oxford University Press. Presently, he is at work on his second single-authored book, The Darkened Light of Faith: Race, Democracy, and Freedom in African American Political Thought.

    Ellen Rooney is Royce Family Professor of Teaching Excellence in English and Modern Culture and Media. A former director of the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, Rooney serves as Co-Editor of differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies and Associate Editor of Novel: A forum on fiction. Her current research focuses on the intersection of the new formalism emerging in literary studies and contemporary debates on the character and future of reading. She is the author Seductive Reasoning: Pluralism as the Problematic of Contemporary Literary Theory (Cornell University Press, 1989).

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • May
    1

    Speaker and artist Kelly Milukas builds a visual bridge between the arts and sciences, by exploring the mysteries of art and science through photography and 3-dimensional artworks.  In her original commissioned “Keys for the Cure” work for the Regenerative Medicine Foundation in March 2014, Kelly tells “a Modern Science Story with traditional paint and fine art photo and mixed media sculpture.  The works are aimed at advancing the translation, education, and communication on regenerative medicine, stem-cell research, and biotech therapies.  The healing journey and mystery unfolds with keys and locks sprouting to life, taking on human character and form.  In this bold story, each piece transports us closer to the promise we have been given to cure.”

    Kelly Milukas   is an award-winning multi-media artist whose practice includes sculpture, pastel and encaustic painting, and fine art photography.
    Her art work is in national museum, international private and corporate collections, such as The Boston Group; Intarcia Therapeutics; Simpson Healthcare; and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine.
    She has served as a curator and juror and has presented talks in museums, arts and science forums, and arts organizations. She is a founding member of the South Coast Artists, RI & MA, and the Past President of the Providence Art Club.

    This event is part of the Creative Medicine Series which is co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine.

    Arts, Performance, Biology, Medicine, Public Health, Creative Medicine Series, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • This conference takes up the intersections between critical race theory, affect theory, and poetics as a way of exploring how the formal innovation and experimentation engaged in by poets of color is connected in complex and myriad ways to the contexts that shape their production and reception — contexts in which structures of race play a significant role. It does so by addressing the soft boundaries that connect aesthetic expressions of racialized affect found in works by poets such as Berssenbrugge and Rankine and the various theoretical frameworks of affect theory associated with thinkers like Ahmed, Deleuze, Fanon, and Tomkins. In so doing, Feeling Its Presence stages an engagement with the powerful argument that Dorothy Wang makes in her book Thinking Its Presence on behalf of a historically sensitive mode of critical formalism attuned to the relationship between poetic form and “the larger social, historical, and political contexts that produced the poet’s subjectivity.” The scholars presenting their work are graduate students enrolled in the seminar “Theories of Affect: Poetics of Expression Through and Beyond Identity” (HMAN 2400K) and the conference concludes, appropriately enough, with a lecture by Dorothy Wang herself.

    Dorothy Wang is Professor of American Studies at Williams College and the author of Thinking its Presence: Form, Race and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2014).

    Free and open to the public. This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative , is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, the Departments of American Studies, Comparative Literature, English, and Modern Culture and Media, the Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, and the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities