Upcoming Events

  • Alumni Stories: Brown History PhDs and Tenure-track Faculty Careers at Public Universities

    featuring

    Sara Fingal, Assistant Professor, Department of American Studies, California State University, Fullerton

    Alicia Maggard, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Auburn University

    Tshombe Miles, Associate Professor, Department of Black and Latino Studies, Baruch College, City University of New York

     

    To register for the above event, click here.

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

    More Information 21st-Century PhD
  • Data can be an important part of a humanities research project. It can provide new insights into your work, offering new ways to understand and make sense of your subject matter. Digital humanities can be an important part of the 21st century Ph.D.’s professional skill set.

    Working with data means you need to be concerned with that data at every stage of the project. Where does it come from? How accessible is it? How has it been cleaned? How will it be preserved? How do you negotiate the choices that need to be made as you move from research questions to argument and presentation?

    Join us for a workshop on the choices you need to make when you decide to use data as part of a scholarly project. CDS staff and their graduate student partners will discuss their digital projects. How were they designed and produced? What decisions did they make about tools and process? How did that shape the project and the results? What did they learn, what choices did they make, and what would they do differently next time?

    Featured speakers and projects include, among others:

    • Talya Housman (Ph.D., History, 2019), on her dissertation “‘To Plunder All Under the Petty-Coate’: Prosecuting Sexual Crime and Gendered Violence in The English Revolution” and the database she created.
    • George Elliott (Ph.D. Candidate, History), gathering data about 17th-century Connecticut alchemist Gershom Bulkeley.
    • Maiah Letsch (Graduate Student, History, Utrecht University), on her work with the Database of Indigenous Slavery in the Americas.

    This workshop is aimed at humanities scholars and students without a background in digital scholarship. Many of these issues are also of concern for projects in the sciences and social sciences, and all are welcome.

    Presented by the Center for Digital Scholarship, the Cogut Institute for the Humanities as part of its 21st-Century Ph.D. Series, and the Data Science Initiative.

    Register More Information 21st-Century PhD, Humanities
  • Live from the Field: History and Humanities PhDs in University Administration

    Featuring

    Ferentz LaFargue, Dean of the College, Saybrook College, Yale University

    Laura Perille, Associate Director, Office of Fellowships, Awards, and Resources, Georgetown University

    Joel Revill, Senior Associate Dean of the Faculty and Adjunct Assistant Professor of History, Brown University

     

    To register for the above event, click here.

     

    What is theWhat History Looks Like series?

    Established in 2016, the Brown History Department’s What History Looks Like series continues for its fifth consecutive year with the same enduring purpose: to foster a space where Brown History Department faculty, students, and historians in other departments can share the versatility of their skills and experiences, and learn more about the diverse settings where historical work takes place.

    More Information 21st-Century PhD
  • THE NEWBERRY LIBRARY, Chicago, IL

    Lia Markey, director of the Center for Renaissance Studies, Suzanne Karr Schmidt (George Amos Poole III Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts, a Brown alum! ), Jill Gage (Reference Librarian and Bibliographer for British Literature and History at the Newberry and Custodian of the John M. Wing Foundation on the History of Printing) and Will Hansen (Director of Reader Services and Curator of Americana) will be offering a joint presentation on the Collection and its resources, followed by a Q&A.

    The Early Modern World in United States Libraries and Collections Orientations and Opportunities

    This unique series of interactive events showcase the resources of some of the world’s most prestigious libraries and special collections for research on the early modern period.

    On each occasion, representatives will speak from their institution to explain the nature of its holdings, offering orientations to potential first-time readers and new information valuable to regular visitors. Following the introductory presentations, there will be opportunities for questions and answers about practical matters – ranging from subject specialisms and reproduction permissions to programs and residence or fellowship opportunities.

    The series will continue through 2021 and 2022 and will be extended to introduce some international libraries in future years. The first event on February 3rd, 2021 involved the Folger Institute, with which the Center enjoys a longstanding and active association, and there was a presentation from representatives of the Nettie Lee Benson Library on February 24th.

    These events are organized exclusively for Brown graduates, faculty, and associate members of the Center.

    More Information Early Modern World, Humanities, Research, Social Sciences
  • Those who refused the last President’s efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election were often those most closely involved in supervising or working on their states’ election process and count. While their refusals to be enlisted in an undemocratic scheme may be related to character, or decency, or even fear of being caught, another possibility is suggestive: Might it be that the experience of working on the election, as on other things, might create an attachment to the product of work that is not easy to undo? As we appreciate essential workers in the time of COVID, might we also come to appreciate this important detail about electoral work in this same context?

    Talk by Bonnie Honig and responses by Alberto Alcaraz Escarcega, Doctoral Student in Political Science at Brown University, and Noga Rotem, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Washington in Seattle.

    The series “Democracy: A Humanities Perspective” is convened by Amanda Anderson, Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. The series features short talks followed by two responses and a larger conversation among the participants and the audience. Through both the format and the content, we aim to showcase the forms of layered understanding and analysis that humanities scholars bring to the study of democracy, with special emphasis on current challenges in the US and abroad. The events are free and open to the public.

    Speaker Bios

    Bonnie Honig  

    Bonnie Honig, Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Modern Culture and Media (MCM) and Political Science at Brown University, works in feminist, legal, and democratic theory and cultural studies. She is currently an affiliate of the Digital Democracy Institute at Simon Fraser University and the American Bar Foundation, Chicago. Her work in political theory ranges widely, from the liberal-communitarian debate to immigration politics and emergency politics. She has written several books including Democracy and the Foreigner (Princeton, 2001) and Antigone, Interrupted (Cambridge, 2013). Her last book Public Things: Democracy in Disrepair came out days after Trump’s 2017 inauguration. Her first piece of public writing about that presidency, “The President’s House is Empty,” appeared on inauguration day 2017 in the Boston Review. She has two books coming out this spring, A Feminist Theory of Refusal (Harvard, May 2021) and a collection of her public writing called Shellshocked: Feminist Criticism After Trump (Fordham, March 2021).

    Alberto Alcaraz Escarcega  

    Alberto Alcaraz Escarcega is a second-year Ph.D. student specializing in Political Theory. His research focuses on how discourses and regimes of knowledge constitute our various identities and subjectivities, and how struggles over identity—such as gender-, race-, and class-based struggles—mediate political action. Currently, he is interested in exploring a more-than-human account of political subjectivity. What possibilities open up if we radically open up subject formation to the variegated forces of what is usually (mis)understood as inert “stuff?” One possibility is that we can begin to understand different stimuli not as merely events that evoke specific reactions in an already formed subject, but also as constitutive of the subject itself. A set of stimuli that he is particularly interested in exploring is the constant stream of lights, sound, and vibrations that emanate from our cell phones. How are these (and the information that they represent) rewiring our understanding of the self, other, and community?

    Noga Rotem  

    Noga Rotem is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Washington in Seattle. She earned her Ph.D. in Political Theory from the Department of Political Science at Brown University (2021). During her doctoral studies she was a graduate fellow at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities and a teaching fellow at the Pembroke Center. Her article “World-Craving: Rahel Varnhagen, Daniel Paul Schreber, and the Strange Promise of Paranoia” appeared in Political Theory in 2020.

    More Information Humanities
  • A John Hay Library/Center for the Study of the Early Modern World fellowship project, this interdisciplinary symposium convenes to bring forward new or underexplored theories of performance in the study of the global early modern, with a focus on performance in relation to the objects of historical analysis. These objects may be archival materials, the individuals or collectivities that produced these materials, or conceptual and abstract knowledge-objects. How can performance, as a theoretical rubric, illuminate the interaction within and among such categories of object, as well as between object and subject— both historical subjects and historian-subjects? How do objects represent, enact, or mediate performance? In what ways can one object surrogate or perform as another? How do objects circulate performances across distances of space and time?

    The symposium will be held virtually over two sessions on June 14th and June 15th. Papers by invited scholars will be published online in advance. Each of the two symposium sessions will be divided between discussion of the papers and presentations by participants on relevant objects digitized from the John Hay Library’s collections. Professor Holly Shaffer of Brown’s Department of the History of Art and Architecture will moderate.

    More Information Early Modern World, Humanities, Libraries, Social Sciences