Upcoming Events

  • Readings and conversation between poet Joan Naviyuk Kane and historian Bathsheba Demuth

    How do works like Jen Rose Smith’s forthcoming Indeterminate Natures: Race and Indigeneity in Ice-Geographies and Bathsheba Demuth’s Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait intersect with indigenous poetry? How have issues of gender, economic parity, and environmental justice informed or complicated indigenous poetics, and vice versa? This event will take up contemporary indigenous poetry’s relationship to the political imperatives of intensifying global concern. It will consider how indigenous poetry takes on questions of environmental harm, economic insecurity, and unstable regimes of governance—questions that Indigenous poetries situate in the long arc of U.S. and European colonialism. And thinking beyond the politics of emergency, it will ask how indigenous poetics carry forward systems and practices of relation that have given and continue to give steadfastness to tribal ways of life across generations.

    Joan Naviyuk Kane is Inupiaq with family from King Island (Ugiuvak) and Mary’s Igloo, Alaska. A 2019-2020 Hilles Bush Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Kane was a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow in Poetry. Her publications include the essay collection A Few Lines in the Manifest (Albion Books, 2018), and poetry books and chapbooks The Cormorant Hunter’s Wife (NorthShore Press Alaska, 2009), Hyperboreal (Pitt Poetry Series, 2013), The Straits (Center for the Study of Place, 2015), Milk Black Carbon (Pitt Poetry Series, 2017), Sublingual (Finishing Line Press, 2018), and Another Bright Departure (CutBank, 2019). She has been the recipient of the Whiting Writer’s Award, the Donald Hall Prize in Poetry, the American Book Award, the Alaska Literary Award, the United States Artists Foundation Creative Vision Award, and fellowships and residencies from the Rasmuson Foundation, the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, the School for Advanced Research, the Aninstantia Foundation, the Hermitage Artist Retreat, and the Lannan Foundation. She has been a finalist for the PEN USA Literary Award, the Poetry Foundation’s Ruth Lilly Prize, and the Dorset Prize. She raises her sons as a single mother in Cambridge, and is one of the founding faculty of the graduate creative writing program at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    Bathsheba Demuth is Assistant Professor of History and Environment & Society at Brown University, where she is also an affiliated faculty member in Native American and Indigenous Studies and Science and Technology Studies. An environmental historian, her research focuses on the lands and seas of the Russian and North American Arctic and on how the histories of people, ideas, places, and non-human species intersect. Her first book, Floating Coast: An Environmental History of the Bering Strait (Norton, 2019) examined capitalist and socialist attempts to transform the northern borderlands of both countries, while her new research turns to the Yukon River watershed and how rights for nonhuman beings have been conceived and codified across indigenous, imperial, and nation-state traditions.

    Free, open to the public. This event is co-sponsored by the Department of History, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative, and Program in Science, Technology, and Society.

    Humanities
  • Jan
    29
    6:00pm - 8:00pm

    Political Concepts Reading Group • Capitalism and the Human

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Political Concept Reading Group meets monthly. Its 2019-20 theme is Capitalism and the Human, the topic of a conference held at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities on April 3-4.

    This meeting focuses on two essays from Claire Colebrook’s The Death of the Posthuman, and Sex After Life (Open Humanities Press Michigan Publishing, 2014).
    • “Extinct Theory“ and
    • “The Sustainability of Concepts: Knowledge and Human Interests”

    All are welcome. To receive the readings or if you have questions please contact the reading group’s 2019-20 organizers, Marah Nagelhout ([email protected] ) and Nick Pisanelli ([email protected] ).

    The Capitalism and the Human Reading Group is part of the Political Concepts Initiative.

    Humanities, Political Concepts Initiative
  • What did Dante know about classical pederasty? Was he concerned that the great masters he emulated—father figures—were often also unabashed lovers of young men? Most urgently, did he think of Virgil in this context? This talk will first set out some broad historical and theoretical considerations around intergenerational male-male desire from antiquity through the Renaissance with help from Freud and post-Freudian queer theory. The subsequent focus will then be on the remarkable celebration of Virgil’s warrior-lovers Nisus and Euryalus in the first canto of Dante’s Inferno.

    Gary Cestaro is Associate Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and the LGBTQ Studies Program at DePaul University in Chicago. He is the author of Dante and the Grammar of the Nursing Body (University of Notre Dame Press, 2003) and editor of the collection Queer Italia: Same-Sex Desire in Italian Literature and Film (Palgrave Macmillan/St. Martin’s, 2004). He is currently working on a book entitled Dante’s Queer Genealogies.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public.

  • Feb
    10
    12:00pm - 1:00pm

    Undergraduate Info Session

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Are you interested in research in the humanities?

    The Cogut Institute for the Humanities offers an undergraduate fellowship for students passionate about the humanities or humanistic social sciences. Fellowships include a $1000 research fund and the unique opportunity to discuss your research alongside a multi-disciplinary group of faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students. Fellows participate in a weekly seminar and lunch every Tuesday from 11:00 am – 2:00 pm. The seminar can appear on your spring semester transcript and carry one credit for the year.

    Rising senior honors students are eligible to apply, but all are welcome to attend this information session on February 10 at noon to learn more about Cogut and the application process. Pizza will be served.

    Learn more.

    Humanities, Research, Social Sciences
  • Feb
    12
    5:30pm - 7:30pm

    Adam Gopnik • “Liberalism and Love”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Lecture and Book Signing

    Adam Gopnik has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1987. During his three decades at the magazine, he has written fiction, humor, memoirs, critical essays, and reported pieces from at home and abroad. Gopnik has three National Magazine awards, for essays and for criticism, and also a George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. He is the author of numerous books, including A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventures of Liberalism, At The Strangers’ Gate, The Table Comes First, Paris To The Moon, Through The Children’s Gate and the children’s novel The King’s Window. A musical, written in collaboration with the composer David Shire, “The Most Beautiful Room In New York,” opened May 2017 at the Long Wharf Theater in New Haven, and his one man show “The Gates” is based on material developed with The Moth. In March of 2013, Gopnik was awarded the medal of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Montreal, he lives in New York City.

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Feb
    13
    9:00am - 10:30am

    Adam Gopnik • Undergraduate seminar

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This special seminar with Adam Gopnik is open to undergraduate students only. Please register at this link .

    The seminar location will accompany the reading material.

    Adam Gopnik has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1987. During his three decades at the magazine, he has written fiction, humor, memoirs, critical essays, and reported pieces from at home and abroad. Gopnik has three National Magazine awards, for essays and for criticism, and also a George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. He is the author of numerous books, including A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventures of Liberalism, At The Strangers’ Gate, The Table Comes First, Paris To The Moon, Through The Children’s Gate and the children’s novel The King’s Window. A musical, written in collaboration with the composer David Shire, “The Most Beautiful Room In New York”, opened May 2017 at the Long Wharf Theater in New Haven, and his one man show “The Gates” is based on material developed with The Moth. In March of 2013, Gopnik was awarded the medal of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Montreal, he lives in New York City.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities .

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Feb
    20

    Hazel V. Carby, Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies and Professor of American Studies Emerita at Yale University, will participate in a panel discussion of her recent book, Imperial Intimacies: A Tale of Two Islands (Verso, 2019) with Saidiya Hartman (English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University), Brian Meeks (Africana Studies, Brown University), Dixa Ramírez D’Oleo (American Studies and English, Brown University), and Deborah Thomas (Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania).

    Imperial Intimacies “untangles the threads connecting members of her family in a web woven by the British Empire across the Atlantic… . Moving between Jamaican plantations, the hills of Devon, the port cities of Bristol, Cardiff, and Kingston, and the working-class estates of South London, Carby’s family story is at once an intimate personal history and a sweeping summation of the violent entanglement of two islands. In charting British empire’s interweaving of capital and bodies, public language and private feeling, Carby will find herself reckoning with what she can tell, what she can remember, and what she can bear to know.” Read more.

    Free, open to the public.  Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America, Africana Studies, and the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice. Book signing to follow.

    This event is convened by Tina Campt , Owen F. Walker Professor of Humanities and Modern Culture and Media, and presented as part of the Black Visualities Initiative.

    Black Visualities, Humanities
  • Anne Dunlop, Professor of Fine Arts, Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne, studies the art of 14th and 15th century Italy and Mongol Eurasia. She has published five books, including Andrea del Castagno and the Limits of Painting(2015) and edited Antipodean Early Modern(Amsterdam University Press, 2018). Her lecture is part of the year-long series called On Speculation.

    The series is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World and the Department of the History of Art and Architecture’s Margerie Cutler, Joseph Edinburgh, and Kenneth List funds. Additional support comes from the C.V. Starr Foundation Lectureship Fund.

    Early Modern World, HIAA Annual Lecture Series, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities
  • Feb
    24
    6:00pm - 9:00pm

    Film Screening • Meenu Gaur and Farjad Nabi, “Zinda Bhaag”

    Acoustic Java Cafe and Microcinema, 204 South Main, Providence, RI 02903

    This Film-Thinking event features Zinda Bhaag (Run for your Life, 120 minutes. in Punjabi with English subtitles), a 2013 Pakistani drama film co-directed by Meenu Gaur and Farjad Nabi. The film focuses on the issue of illegal migration. A post-screening conversation begins promptly at 8:00 pm with Ulka Anjari , Professor of English and South Asian Studies at Brandeis University, and Brown University faculty Karan Mahajan , Assistant Professor of Literary Arts, and Vazira Zamindar , Associate Professor of History.

    Film-Thinking is a series of conversations hosted by the Cogut Institute for the Humanities during 2019-2020, which asks how cinema can help us to think the many challenges facing our moment. According to the novelist Jonathan Coe, “A movie is something we should only see when somebody else shows it to us.” In the spirit of Coe’s remark, each Film-Thinking event will comprise a curated screening of a film and a post-screening conversation. A pre-circulated Film Note offers a point of departure for the screening and the discussion. The aim of Film-Thinking is to enlarge our sense of the politics of cinema and collectively expand our understanding of film’s capacity for thought. Screenings begin at 6:00 pm.

    Free and open to the public.

    Food/drinks available for purchase at Acoustic Java Cafe and Microcinema.

    Film-Thinking, Humanities
  • Mar
    2
    10:00am - 11:30am

    PITH Seminar • “The Influence of Dewey on Race Theory”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This Politics in the Humanities seminar with Professor Paul C. Taylor, author of Black is Beautiful: A Philosophy of Black Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2016) and On Obama (Routledge, 2016) is open by registration only. Information on the seminar’s location will accompany a pre-circulated reading on The Influence of Dewey on Race Theory by Paul C. Taylor.

    To attend the PITH Seminar please register at this link.   A light breakfast will be provided.

    Paul C. Taylor is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses primarily on Aesthetics, Social and Political Philosophy, Critical Race Theory, and Africana Philosophy. His books include On Obama (Routledge, 2016) and Black Is Beautiful: A Philosophy of Black Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2016), which received the 2017 monograph prize from the American Society for Aesthetics. He also provided commentary for a variety of print and broadcast outlets, including Xinhua News, the CBC, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and the BBC. Taylor received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Morehouse College, a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Rutgers University.

    Paul C. Taylor will also give a public lecture Uneasy Sanctuaries: Rethinking Race-Thinking  on March 2, 2020 at 5:30PM in Pembroke Hall 305.

    Both events are presented by PITH – Politics in the Humanities and co-sponsored by the Departments of Africana Studies, American Studies, and Philosophy.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH
  • Mar
    2
    5:30pm - 7:30pm

    Paul C. Taylor • “Uneasy Sanctuaries: Rethinking Race-Thinking”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    In the introduction to his remarkable book, Shadow and Act, Ralph Ellison identifies one of the stumbling blocks to successful “Negro” fiction. The problem, he suggests, is “the writers’ refusal… to achieve a vision of life and a resourcefulness of craft commensurate with the complexity of their actual situation.” (Collected Essays of Ralph Ellison 59). What does this refusal lead to? “Too often,” Ellison explains, writers “fear to leave the uneasy sanctuary of race to take their chances in a world of art.”

    Ellison’s diagnosis, or something like it, applies with equal force to philosophers. “We are also prone to treating real-world complexity as something that sullies or sidetracks the work of philosophy,” Paul Taylor observes, “especially when that complexity arises from the swirl of intersecting conditions that work through and with the forces of racialization. For us, too often, race is just the first sanctuary, and our attempts to escape it lead us to other places of refuge, to other ways of evading the vicissitudes of embodiment, location, finitude, and politics.”

    In this talk, Taylor proposes to explore the itinerary of evasion that can result from philosophical attempts to take race seriously. This itinerary will run through a variety of uneasy sanctuaries, starting with race itself and winding through disciplinarity, canonicity, heretical theory, and prophetic witness. The aim will be to highlight some underappreciated challenges to the work of philosophical race theory and to cultivate a responsible orientation to the work in light of its challenges.

    Paul C. Taylor is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses primarily on Aesthetics, Social and Political Philosophy, Critical Race Theory, and Africana Philosophy. His books include On Obama (Routledge, 2016) and Black Is Beautiful: A Philosophy of Black Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2016), which received the 2017 monograph prize from the American Society for Aesthetics. He also provided commentary for a variety of print and broadcast outlets, including Xinhua News, the CBC, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and the BBC.

    Free, open to the public. This event is presented by PITH – Politics in the Humanities and co-sponsored by the Departments of Africana Studies, American Studies, and Philosophy.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH
  • Mar
    4
    12:30pm - 1:30pm

    Chopin Piano Recital with Benjamin Nacar ‘12

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Pianist and composer Benjamin Nacar ’12 offers a mid-day concert. The all Chopin program includes:

    • Scherzo no. 2 in B-flat minor, op. 31
    • Fantaisie in F minor, op. 49
    • Ballade no. 1 in G minor, op. 23
    • Polonaise in A-flat major, op. 53 (“Heroic”)

    This concert is free and open to the public.

    Arts, Performance, Humanities
  • Kate Brown, Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, will give a talk presented by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) and co-sponsored by the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB).

    More information is forthcoming.

    Free and open to the public. This event, presented by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, is co-sponsored by the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB) with the Department of History.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • EARLY MODERN ANNUAL LECTURE
    Writing History in the Sixteenth Century: Remarking the Boundaries of a Discipline in the New Spain

    After their conquest and colonization of Mexico in the 1500s, the Spaniards needed to understand the customs and the past of the native peoples in order to impose their own law and authority. But European ideas of time and history are not universal: how did Mesoamerican cosmology make sense in terms of Christian European chronology? And how did indigenous people retain or understand memory of the pre-Hispanic past? This lecture will show how both Spaniards and Indians began to produce a new form of world history.

    Serge Gruzinski has taught at the Écoles des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), Paris, as well as in Brazil (Bélem) and the United States (Princeton). His work has been translated into numerous languages and he has authored more than twenty books including The Mestizo Mind: The Intellectual Dynamics of Colonization and Globalization (Routledge, 2002), What Time is it There? America and Islam at the Dawn of Modern Times (Polity Press, 2011) and The Eagle and the Dragon: Globalization and European Dreams of Conquest in China and America in the Sixteenth Century (Polity Press, 2014). He has received several honorary doctorates and awards, including the Howard F. Cline Memorial Prize 1991, Médaille d’argent of the CNRS 1996, Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur 2000, and the First International Prize in History at the 22nd Congress of the International Committee of Historical Sciences (ICHS) in Jinan, China in 2015.

    This is the first of a series of prestigious public lectures instituted at Brown by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World. The lectures will be held each year in the Spring semester.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public.

    Early Modern World, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Lecture and Conversation

    Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa, and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; and, most recently, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. She is the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes and an American Book Award, and has twice been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her most recent novel, Lost Children Archive, longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019, is her first to be written in English. Her work has appeared in The New York Times and McSweeney’s among other publications and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She lives in New York City.

    This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Mar
    13
    10:00am - 11:30am

    Valeria Luiselli • Undergraduate seminar

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This special seminar with Valeria Luiselli is open to undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event. 

    Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa, and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; and, most recently, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. She is the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes and an American Book Award, and has twice been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her most recent novel, Lost Children Archive, longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019, is her first to be written in English. Her work has appeared in The New York Times and McSweeney’s among other publications and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She lives in New York City.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities .

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Apr
    3
    All Day

    Conference • “Capitalism and the Human”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    In a world in which capitalist expansion seems perpetually on the verge of taking leave of human scales of experience and value, what has happened to the philosophical critique of the human, one of the most influential traditions of twentieth-century radical thought? With the threats to human existence and autonomy posed by climate change, surveillance capitalism, and the effects of rapid techno-social innovation, is there any political appetite or space left for a critique of humanist ideology? When human qualities of living and interacting seem threatened by neoliberal modes of rationality, is there a case for substantially recasting the terms of posthumanist critical thought, or should resistance take the form of a radical defense of the human and humanity? This conference begins from the premise that any thinking of the human today, from whatever position, must be accompanied by close attention to the dynamics of contemporary capitalism; and, conversely, that the critique of contemporary capitalism cannot evade the encounter with the question of the human.

    Additional information is forthcoming.

    The conference is co-organized by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English and Interim Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and Jeremy Gilbert, Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London, and Visiting Professor in the Humanities at Brown University this Spring 2020.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities
  • Apr
    8

    When you are told that you have leukemia, your world stops. Your brain can’t function. You are asked to make decisions about treatment almost immediately, when you are not in your right mind. And yet you pull yourself together and start asking questions. People are both terrified and fascinated by leukemia in all its forms. It is a monster — a malignant golem — that grows out of control and invades the organs within our own bodies. It is metastatic at its genesis. Beside you is your doctor, whose job it is to solve the awful puzzle of bone marrow gone wrong. The two of you are in it together.

    In this talk, Mikkael Sekeres, a leading cancer specialist and frequent essayist for the New York Times, presents his forthcoming book When Blood Breaks Down: Lessons from Leukemia (MIT Press, 2020). He tells the stories of people whose undaunted spirit and utter humanity, in the face of a treasonous bone marrow that has turned on them, teach us about courage, grace, and defying the odds — teach us how to live a life.

    Mikkael Sekeres, MD is Professor of Medicine, Director of the Leukemia Program, and Vice Chair for Clinical Research at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, and Deputy Associate Director for Clinical Research of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, in Ohio. He earned a medical degree and a master’s degree in clinical epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Sekeres completed his postgraduate training at Harvard University, finishing an internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and a fellowship in hematology-oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. He chaired the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee of the F.D.A and is chair of the medical advisory board of the Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) International Foundation, the MDS Research Fund of the Dresner Foundation, and the Cleveland Clinic Enterprise Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committee. In addition to his work for the NYT, he has written essays for Huffington Post, The Hill,Fox News, The Plain Dealer, and the American Society of Hematology Clinical News magazine, for which he was Editor-in-Chief. He has authored over 350 scientific articles, 500 scientific abstracts, and 6 books.

    This event, presented as part of Creative Medicine and co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine, is free and open to the public.

    Creative Medicine Series, Humanities
  • Apr
    10
    12:00pm - 7:00pm

    Conference • Radical Gardening in the Time of Climate Change

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The conveners of this conference are Mary Baker, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science, Brown University, and Elizabeth Hoover , Associate Professor of American Studies at Brown University.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event is presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), it is free and open to the public.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Apr
    16
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Catriona Sandilands • Lecture in Environmental Humanities (TitleTBD)

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Catriona Sandilands is Professor of Environmental Studies at York University, Toronto. Her areas of research include environmental humanities and ecocriticism; environmental public cultures and biopolitics; queer, trans* and feminist ecologies; critical plant studies; biocultural diversity and multispecies cohabitation. 

    Free and open to the public. This event, presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), is co-sponsored by the Charles K. Colver Lectureships and Publications Fund; the Departments of French Studies, History, and Religious Studies; the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES); the Program in Science, Technology, and Society; and the Watson Institute.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • It has been argued that heroic poetry on martial themes disappeared in the seventeenth century because it could not accommodate technological changes in warfare. This lecture explores the history of European epic in both in Latin and in vernacular languages, in order to show that focus on one at the expense of the other can lead to perilous historical and literary-historical distortions.

    Keith Sidwell, Emeritus Professor, University College Cork and Adjunct Professor, University of Calgary, Canada, has also taught at in Cambridge and Lancaster in the UK, and in the Republic of Ireland at NUI Maynooth and University College, Cork where he was the Professor of Latin and Greek and Head of Department. His research interests range from Greek tragedy and comedy to the influence of Lucian on Renaissance Latin literature, and Irish early modern Latin. He has published widely and his books include: Lucian: Chattering Courtesans and Other Sardonic Sketches, Penguin 2004;Aristophanes the Democrat, Cambridge University Press 2009; Making Ireland Roman: Irish Latin Writers and the Republic of Letters, Cork 2009 (with Jason Harris); The Tipperary Hero: Dermot O’Meara’s Ormonius (1615), Brepols, Belgium 2011 (with David Edwards); and (with P. Lenihan) Poema de Hibernia: A Jacobite Epic on the Williamite War (1689-91), Dublin: Irish MSS Commission, 2018.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Humanities
  • May
    1
    All Day

    Collaborative Public Workshop

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Public Workshop concludes the offering of the capstone seminar for the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities . The seminar, HMAN 2500: Project Development Workshop, is taught in Spring 2020 by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English, and Brian Meeks, Professor of Africana Studies.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative, is free and open to the public.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • May
    7
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    Collaborative Humanities Retreat

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Humanities Retreat offers faculty and students an opportunity to reflect on the program and concludes the third academic year of the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities,  which is part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative.

    More information about this event is forthcoming.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities, Social Sciences