Upcoming Events

  • “Are We Not Doing Phrasing Anymore?”: Towards a Cultural Informatics

    John Laudun, University of Louisiana

    Recent headlines in major news outlets like the New York Times or the Chronicle of Higher Education reveal the profound suspicion with which statistical methods have been received within the humanities. The pervasive belief is that a chasm lies between statistics and the humanities that not only cannot be bridged but should not be attempted, at the risk of losing the human. And yet slowly and steadily a growing number of practitioners have not only developed research programs but also pedagogical methods that open up new analytical perspectives as well as new avenues for students to explore their relationship between the subject matter and their own understanding. This talk offers a small survey of various practices to be found in the digital humanities alongside a few experiments by the author in allowing students to experience how statistical methods in fact de-mystify the meaning-making process in language and empower students not only to ground their insights in things they can see, and count, but also, in understanding texts as nothing more than certain sequences of words, opening a path to making them better writers as well. Working from a broad survey to narrow applications, the talk suggests that concerns about a loss of humanity in the humanities is actually a concern for loss of certain kinds of authority, but that new kinds of authority are possible within which researchers and teachers will find a firm ground from which to offer interpretations and evaluations of the kinds of complex artifacts that have long been the purview of the domain.

    John Laudun received his MA in literary studies from Syracuse University in 1989 and his PhD in folklore studies from the Folklore Institute at Indiana University in 1999. He was a Jacob K. Javits Fellow while at Syracuse and Indiana (1987-1992), and a MacArthur Scholar at the Indiana Center for Global Change and World Peace (1993-94). He has written grants that have been funded by the Grammy Foundation and the Louisiana Board of Regents, been a fellow with the EVIA Digital Archive and a scholar in residence with UCLA’s Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics. His book, The Amazing Crawfish Boat, is a longitudinal ethnographic study of creativity and tradition within a material folk culture domain. Laudun’s current work is in the realm of culture analytics. He is currently engaged in several collaborations with physicists and other scientists seeking to understand how texts can be modeled computationally in order to better describe functions and features.

    Lunch will be served!

  • Feb
    26
    6:00pm - 8:00pm

    Political Concepts Reading Group • Capitalism and the Human

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Political Concept Reading Group meets monthly. Its 2019-20 theme is Capitalism and the Human , the topic of a conference held at the Cogut Institute for the Humanities on April 3-4, 2020.

    This meeting focuses on Chapter 6 (Feeling Together: Affect, Identity and the Politics of the Common) from Jeremy Gilbert’s book Common Ground: Democracy and Collectivity in an Age of Individualism (Pluto Press, 2013).

    All are welcome. To receive the readings or if you have questions please contact the reading group’s 2019-20 organizers, Marah Nagelhout ([email protected] ) and Nick Pisanelli ([email protected] ).

    The Capitalism and the Human Reading Group is part of the Political Concepts Initiative.

    Political Concepts Initiative
  • Mar
    2
    10:00am - 11:30am

    PITH Seminar • “The Influence of Dewey on Race Theory”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This Politics in the Humanities seminar with Professor Paul C. Taylor, author of Black is Beautiful: A Philosophy of Black Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2016) and On Obama (Routledge, 2016) is open by registration only. Information on the seminar’s location will accompany a pre-circulated reading on The Influence of Dewey on Race Theory by Paul C. Taylor.

    To attend the PITH Seminar please register at this link.   A light breakfast will be provided.

    Paul C. Taylor is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses primarily on Aesthetics, Social and Political Philosophy, Critical Race Theory, and Africana Philosophy. His books include On Obama (Routledge, 2016) and Black Is Beautiful: A Philosophy of Black Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2016), which received the 2017 monograph prize from the American Society for Aesthetics. He also provided commentary for a variety of print and broadcast outlets, including Xinhua News, the CBC, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and the BBC. Taylor received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Morehouse College, a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Rutgers University.

    Paul C. Taylor will also give a public lecture on Uneasy Sanctuaries: Rethinking Race-Thinking  on March 2, 2020 at 5:30PM in Pembroke Hall 305.

    Both events are convened by Kevin Quashie as part of PITH – Politics in the Humanities and co-sponsored by the Departments of Africana Studies, American Studies, and Philosophy.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH
  • Mar
    2
    5:30pm - 7:30pm

    Paul C. Taylor • “Uneasy Sanctuaries: Rethinking Race-Thinking”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    In the introduction to his remarkable book, Shadow and Act, Ralph Ellison identifies one of the stumbling blocks to successful “Negro” fiction. The problem, he suggests, is “the writers’ refusal… to achieve a vision of life and a resourcefulness of craft commensurate with the complexity of their actual situation” (Collected Essays of Ralph Ellison 59). What does this refusal lead to? “Too often,” Ellison explains, writers “fear to leave the uneasy sanctuary of race to take their chances in a world of art.”

    Ellison’s diagnosis, or something like it, applies with equal force to philosophers. “We are also prone to treating real-world complexity as something that sullies or sidetracks the work of philosophy,” Paul Taylor observes, “especially when that complexity arises from the swirl of intersecting conditions that work through and with the forces of racialization. For us, too often, race is just the first sanctuary, and our attempts to escape it lead us to other places of refuge, to other ways of evading the vicissitudes of embodiment, location, finitude, and politics.”

    In this talk, Taylor proposes to explore the itinerary of evasion that can result from philosophical attempts to take race seriously. This itinerary will run through a variety of uneasy sanctuaries, starting with race itself and winding through disciplinarity, canonicity, heretical theory, and prophetic witness. The aim will be to highlight some underappreciated challenges to the work of philosophical race theory and to cultivate a responsible orientation to the work in light of its challenges.

    Paul C. Taylor is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses primarily on Aesthetics, Social and Political Philosophy, Critical Race Theory, and Africana Philosophy. His books include On Obama (Routledge, 2016) and Black Is Beautiful: A Philosophy of Black Aesthetics (Blackwell, 2016), which received the 2017 monograph prize from the American Society for Aesthetics. He also provided commentary for a variety of print and broadcast outlets, including Xinhua News, the CBC, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and the BBC.

    Free, open to the public. This event is convened by Kevin Quashie as part of PITH – Politics in the Humanities and co-sponsored by the Departments of Africana Studies, American Studies, and Philosophy.

    Humanities, Politics in the Humanities PITH
  • Mar
    4
    12:30pm - 1:30pm

    Chopin Piano Recital with Benjamin Nacar ‘12

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Pianist and composer Benjamin Nacar ’12 offers a mid-day concert with an all Chopin program.

    • Scherzo no. 2 in B-flat minor, op. 31
    • Introduction and Rondo in E-flat, op. 16
    • Fantaisie in F minor, op. 49
    • Nocturne in F-sharp, op. 15 no. 2
    • Etude in A minor, op. 25 no. 11 (“Winter Wind”)
    • Ballade no. 1 in G minor, op. 23
    • Mazurka in C-sharp minor, op. 30 no. 4
    • Mazurka in F minor, op. 7 no. 3
    • Polonaise in A-flat, op. 53 (“Heroic”)

    This concert is free and open to the public.

    Arts, Performance, Humanities
  • Hoy en día se sabe muy poco de la rica historia intelectual y cultural de Charcas colonial, que formó parte del Virreinato del Perú y cuyo territorio corresponde aproximadamente a la moderna Bolivia. Desde hace mucho tiempo, Andrés Eichmann está desenterrando e interpretando la literatura en español (además de algunas obras en latín) de la región, producida en los siglos XVI y XVII. En esta charla proporcionará una visión general informada de sus hallazgos y explicará el estado actual de la investigación de este campo.

    Very little is known of the rich intellectual and cultural history of colonial Charcas, a part of the Viceroyalty of Peru now roughly constituting the area of modern Bolivia. For several years Andrés Eichmann has been unearthing and interpreting Spanish literature and some works in Latin from the region, which were produced in the 16th and 17th centuries. In this talk he will provide a uniquely informed overview of his findings and explain the current state of investigation in this field.

    This lecture will be given in Spanish.

    Andrés Eichmann Oerhli, Professor (Catedrático) of Latin American Literature in UMSA in La Paz, Bolivia, has had visiting lectureships at the universities of Versailles in France and Navarra in Spain and is founding editor of the journal Classics Boliviana. His book publications includeDe Boliviana latinitate: Pensamiento y latín en Bolivia(2002); Letras humanas y divinas en la muy noble ciudad de La Plata (2005), Cancionero mariano de Charcas (2009), and a volume co-authored with Ignacio Arellano, Entremeses, loas y coloquios de Potosí (2005).

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public.

  • Mar
    5
    12:00pm - 1:30pm

    Kate Brown • “The Great Chernobyl Acceleration”

    79 Brown Street, Sharpe House

    In April 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded and sent upwards of 50 million curies into the surrounding environment. Working through Soviet archives, Kate Brown encountered many contradictory accounts of the disaster and its effects. Realizing that though people and archives lie, trees probably don’t, she turned to scientists — biologists, foresters, physicians, and physicists — to help her understand the ecology of the greater Chernobyl territories and the health effects that ensued. She learned working in the swampy territory around the blown plant that radioactive contaminants saturated local eco-systems long before the Chernobyl accident and continued long after the 1986 event. Brown argues that to call Chernobyl an “accident” is to sweep aside the continuum of radiation exposure that saturated environments in the northern hemisphere in the second half of the 20th century. Instead of a one-off accident, Brown argues that Chernobyl was a point of acceleration on a timeline of radioactive contamination that continues to this day.

    Kate Brown  is Professor of History in the Science, Technology and Society Department of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is the author of the prize-winning histories Plutopia: Nuclear Families in Atomic Cities and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford University Press, 2013) and A Biography of No Place: From Ethnic Borderland to Soviet Heartland (Harvard University Press, 2004). Kate Brown was a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow. Her work has also been supported by the Carnegie Foundation, the NEH, ACLS, IREX, and the American Academy of Berlin, among others. Her latest book, Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future was published March 2019 by Norton (US), Penguin Lane (UK), Czarne (Poland). In 2020, it will be translated into Ukrainian, Russian, Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian, French, Spanish, and Korean.

    Free and open to the public. This event is presented by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) , and is co-sponsored by the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB) with the Department of History.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • Mar
    5
    7:15pm - 9:00pm

    Film Screening and Conversation • The Otolith Group, “Third Part of the Third Measure”

    Acoustic Java Cafe and Microcinema, 204 South Main St., Providence, RI 02903

    The Third Part of the Third Measure by the Otolith Group (2017, 45 minutes) is an audiovisual composition commissioned by ICA Philadelphia and Sharjah Art Foundation. Described as “an experience of watching in the key of listening,” the composition focuses on the militant minimalism of avant-garde composer, pianist, and vocalist Julius Eastman (1940–1990) and the exemplary ecstatic aesthetics of black radicalism. It invokes political feelings of defiance and the collective practice of movement building that participates in the global struggles against neoreactionary authoritarianism. Read more.

    The screening will be followed by a conversation with London-based filmmakers Anjalika Sagar and Kodwo Eshun, founders of the Otolith Group. Read more.

    Free, open to the public. Food/drinks available for purchase at Acoustic Java Cafe and Microcinema.

    This event is presented by the Black Visualities Initiative as part of the collaborative humanities graduate seminar “The Visual Frequency of Black Life.”

    Black Visualities
  • CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF THE EARLY MODERN WORLD
    FIRST ANNUAL LECTURE
    “Writing History in the Sixteenth Century: Remarking the boundaries of a discipline in New Spain”

    After their conquest and colonization of Mexico in the 1500s, the Spaniards needed to understand the customs and the past of the native peoples in order to impose their own law and authority. But European ideas of time and history are not universal: how did Mesoamerican cosmology make sense in terms of Christian European chronology? And how did indigenous people retain or understand memory of the pre-Hispanic past? This lecture will show how both Spaniards and Indians began to produce a new form of world history.

    Serge Gruzinski has taught at the Écoles des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS), Paris, as well as in Brazil (Bélem) and the United States (Princeton). His work has been translated into numerous languages and he has authored more than twenty books including The Mestizo Mind: The Intellectual Dynamics of Colonization and Globalization (Routledge, 2002), What Time is it There? America and Islam at the Dawn of Modern Times (Polity Press, 2011) and The Eagle and the Dragon: Globalization and European Dreams of Conquest in China and America in the Sixteenth Century (Polity Press, 2014). He has received several honorary doctorates and awards, including the Howard F. Cline Memorial Prize 1991, Médaille d’argent of the CNRS 1996, Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur 2000, and the First International Prize in History at the 22nd Congress of the International Committee of Historical Sciences (ICHS) in Jinan, China in 2015.

    This is the first of a series of prestigious public lectures instituted at Brown by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World. The lectures will be held each year in the Spring semester.

    This event is presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World  and co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and the Department of Anthropology. It is free and open to the public.

    Early Modern World, History, Cultural Studies, Languages, Humanities, Identity, Culture, Inclusion, International, Global Engagement
  • Apr
    3
    All Day

    Conference • “Capitalism and the Human”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Such are the quandaries faced by our moment. “Capitalism and the Human” begins from two closely related premises: first, that the category of the human is today inseparable from the dynamics of contemporary capitalism and can be thought only alongside them; and second, that the critique of capitalism in the twenty-first century cannot evade a critical encounter with the question of the human in its various guises: the persistent allure of concepts such as agency, autonomy and even thought; the philosophical implications of ever more invasive technologies of surveillance and governance; enduring questions of ethical and political responsibility; the continuing policing of the boundaries of the human; the uncertain prospects of species survival.

    Speakers include Claire Colebrook, Ashley Dawson, Jeremy Gilbert, Sophie Lewis, Jason W. Moore, Adrian Parr, Richard Purcell, Jason Read, Deirdra Reber, and Alexander Weheliye. 

    Schedule, talk abstracts, and speaker bios.

    Free, open to the public. The conference is co-organized by Timothy Bewes , Professor of English and Interim Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and Jeremy Gilbert , Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London, and Visiting Professor in the Humanities at Brown University this Spring 2020.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities
  • Apr
    4
    All Day

    Conference • “Capitalism and the Human”

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Such are the quandaries faced by our moment. “Capitalism and the Human” begins from two closely related premises: first, that the category of the human is today inseparable from the dynamics of contemporary capitalism and can be thought only alongside them; and second, that the critique of capitalism in the twenty-first century cannot evade a critical encounter with the question of the human in its various guises: the persistent allure of concepts such as agency, autonomy and even thought; the philosophical implications of ever more invasive technologies of surveillance and governance; enduring questions of ethical and political responsibility; the continuing policing of the boundaries of the human; the uncertain prospects of species survival.

    Speakers include Claire Colebrook, Ashley Dawson, Jeremy Gilbert, Sophie Lewis, Jason W. Moore, Adrian Parr, Richard Purcell, Jason Read, Deirdra Reber, and Alexander Weheliye. 

    Schedule, talk abstracts, and speaker bios.

    Free, open to the public. The conference is co-organized by Timothy Bewes , Professor of English and Interim Director of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, and Jeremy Gilbert , Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at the University of East London, and Visiting Professor in the Humanities at Brown University this Spring 2020.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities
  • Apr
    8

    When you are told that you have leukemia, your world stops. Your brain can’t function. You are asked to make decisions about treatment almost immediately, when you are not in your right mind. And yet you pull yourself together and start asking questions. People are both terrified and fascinated by leukemia in all its forms. It is a monster — a malignant golem — that grows out of control and invades the organs within our own bodies. It is metastatic at its genesis. Beside you is your doctor, whose job it is to solve the awful puzzle of bone marrow gone wrong. The two of you are in it together.

    In this talk, Mikkael Sekeres, a leading cancer specialist and frequent essayist for the New York Times, presents his forthcoming book When Blood Breaks Down: Lessons from Leukemia (MIT Press, 2020). He tells the stories of people whose undaunted spirit and utter humanity, in the face of a treasonous bone marrow that has turned on them, teach us about courage, grace, and defying the odds — teach us how to live a life.

    Mikkael Sekeres, MD is Professor of Medicine, Director of the Leukemia Program, and Vice Chair for Clinical Research at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, and Deputy Associate Director for Clinical Research of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, in Ohio. He earned a medical degree and a master’s degree in clinical epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Sekeres completed his postgraduate training at Harvard University, finishing an internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and a fellowship in hematology-oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. He chaired the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee of the F.D.A and is chair of the medical advisory board of the Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) International Foundation, the MDS Research Fund of the Dresner Foundation, and the Cleveland Clinic Enterprise Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committee. In addition to his work for the NYT, he has written essays for Huffington Post, The Hill,Fox News, The Plain Dealer, and the American Society of Hematology Clinical News magazine, for which he was Editor-in-Chief. He has authored over 350 scientific articles, 500 scientific abstracts, and 6 books.

    This event, presented as part of Creative Medicine and co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine, is free and open to the public.

    Creative Medicine Series, Humanities
  • Apr
    10
    12:30pm - 7:00pm

    Conference • Radical Gardening in the Time of Climate Change

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The conveners of this conference are Mary Baker, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science, Brown University, and Elizabeth Hoover , Associate Professor of American Studies at Brown University.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event is presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), it is free and open to the public.

    Conference, Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Apr
    16
    4:00pm - 5:30pm

    Catriona Sandilands • Lecture in Environmental Humanities (TitleTBD)

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    Catriona Sandilands is Professor of Environmental Studies at York University, Toronto. Her areas of research include environmental humanities and ecocriticism; environmental public cultures and biopolitics; queer, trans* and feminist ecologies; critical plant studies; biocultural diversity and multispecies cohabitation. 

    Free and open to the public. This event, presented as part of the Initiative for Environmental Humanities at Brown (EHAB), is co-sponsored by the Charles K. Colver Lectureships and Publications Fund; the Departments of French Studies, History, and Religious Studies; the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES); the Program in Science, Technology, and Society; and the Watson Institute.

    Environmental Humanities, Humanities
  • Apr
    17
    1:00pm - 2:30pm

    Valeria Luiselli • Undergraduate seminar

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    This special seminar with Valeria Luiselli is open to undergraduate students only. Registration will open closer to the event. 

    Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa, and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; and, most recently, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. She is the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes and an American Book Award, and has twice been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her most recent novel, Lost Children Archive, longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019, is her first to be written in English. Her work has appeared in The New York Times and McSweeney’s among other publications and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She lives in New York City.

    This event is part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series of the Cogut Institute for the Humanities .

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • Lecture and Conversation

    Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa, and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; and, most recently, Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. She is the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes and an American Book Award, and has twice been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her most recent novel, Lost Children Archive, longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2019, is her first to be written in English. Her work has appeared in The New York Times and McSweeney’s among other publications and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She lives in New York City. Read more.  

    Valeria Luiselli will be in conversation with Brown University faculty member Ralph Rodriguez, Professor of American Studies and English. Rodriguez is the author of Latinx Literature Unbound: Undoing Ethnic Expectation (Fordham University Press, 2018) and Brown Gumshoes: Detective Fiction and the Search for Chicana/o Identity (University of Texas Press, 2005). 

    Book signing to follow. This event, presented as part of the Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series,  is free and open to the public.

    Humanities, The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
  • It has been argued that heroic poetry on martial themes disappeared in the seventeenth century because it could not accommodate technological changes in warfare. This lecture explores the history of European epic in both in Latin and in vernacular languages, in order to show that focus on one at the expense of the other can lead to perilous historical and literary-historical distortions.

    Keith Sidwell, Emeritus Professor, University College Cork and Adjunct Professor, University of Calgary, Canada, has also taught at in Cambridge and Lancaster in the UK, and in the Republic of Ireland at NUI Maynooth and University College, Cork where he was the Professor of Latin and Greek and Head of Department. His research interests range from Greek tragedy and comedy to the influence of Lucian on Renaissance Latin literature, and Irish early modern Latin. He has published widely and his books include: Lucian: Chattering Courtesans and Other Sardonic Sketches, Penguin 2004;Aristophanes the Democrat, Cambridge University Press 2009; Making Ireland Roman: Irish Latin Writers and the Republic of Letters, Cork 2009 (with Jason Harris); The Tipperary Hero: Dermot O’Meara’s Ormonius (1615), Brepols, Belgium 2011 (with David Edwards); and (with P. Lenihan) Poema de Hibernia: A Jacobite Epic on the Williamite War (1689-91), Dublin: Irish MSS Commission, 2018.

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public.

    Academic Calendar, University Dates & Events, Humanities
  • Themes, imagery and ideas from Seneca’s moral philosophy infuse the writing of Petrarch and Boccaccio, helping to shape not only their moral views, but also their attitude towards the literature of the past and sense of their own role. Syrithe Pugh will trace Senecan ideas about literature as transcending geographical and temporal boundaries in the two trecento writers, and see how tensions between such transcendence and more mundane concerns and political realities play out in each. The journey will reveal telling differences between the two Italians, and destabilize some dichotomies— master/disciple, Classical/Christian, Mediaeval/Renaissance—which tend to inform scholarly treatments of them and of the period.

    Syrithe Pugh is a Reader in English at the University of Aberdeen, specializing in classical reception in Renaissance literature. She has published three monographs, Spenser and Ovid (2005), Herrick, Fanshawe and the Politics of Intertextuality (2010), and Spenser and Virgil: The Pastoral Poems (2016), which was awarded the Isabel MacCaffrey Award in 2017. Other publications include two forthcoming edited volumes: Conversations: Classical and Renaissance Intertextuality (Manchester University Press) and Euhemerism and its Uses: The Mortal Gods (Routledge).

    This event, presented by the Center for the Study of the Early Modern World, is free and open to the public.

  • May
    1
    All Day

    Collaborative Public Workshop

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Public Workshop concludes the offering of the capstone seminar for the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities . The seminar, HMAN 2500: Project Development Workshop, is taught in Spring 2020 by Timothy Bewes, Professor of English, and Brian Meeks, Professor of Africana Studies.

    More information about this event will be forthcoming.

    This event, presented as part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative, is free and open to the public.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Conference, Humanities, Social Sciences
  • May
    7
    10:00am - 12:00pm

    Collaborative Humanities Retreat

    Cogut Institute, Pembroke Hall

    The Collaborative Humanities Retreat offers faculty and students an opportunity to reflect on the program and concludes the third academic year of the Graduate Certificate in Collaborative Humanities,  which is part of the Collaborative Humanities Initiative.

    More information about this event is forthcoming.

    Collaborative Humanities Initiative, Humanities, Social Sciences