Cogut Institute Events

2017-18

January 26
The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
Terry Tempest Williams
in conversation with Mark Cladis

Pembroke Hall 305
4:00pm

Terry Tempest Williams has been called a "citizen writer," a writer who speaks and speaks out on behalf of an ethical stance toward life.  A naturalist and fierce advocate for freedom of speech, she has consistently shown how environmental issues are social issues that ultimately become matters of justice. Williams will be in conversation with Brooke Russell Astor Professor of Humanities Mark Cladis.

Williams is the author of Refuge:  An Unnatural History of Family and Place and When Women Were Birds.  Her most recent book, The Hour of Land:  A Personal Topography of America's National Parks, is a New York Times bestseller.

Book sales and author signing will be available after the event.


February 7
Creative Medicine Lecture Series
"From Introspection to Advocacy:  Writing, Medicine, and the Mind"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30pm

Psychiatrist and author Christine Montross, MD will use clinical anecotes from her literary nonfiction works to launch broader discussions about employing narrative to examine the challenges implicit in caring for the very ill.   Read more >


February 12
The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
"Democracy and Disinformation"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30pm

Hyper-partisanship is growing, public debate is fragmenting.  New information networks have rapidly undermined not only the Western media's business model, but Western political institutions, too.  Can democracy survive?  Speaker Anne Applebaum is Washington Post columnist and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian.  She is the author of Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine (McClelland and Stewart, 2017), Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956 (McClelland and Stewart, 2012), and Gulag: A History (Doubleday, 2003).


  

February 23
Environmental Humanities, 2017-18
"Writing Climate Change:  A Roundtable with Public Scholars"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
3:00pm

What are the implications of climate change for life on earth? How can we make sense of those changes if we are not trained scientists? Can we do something to slow — and ideally stop — the extinction of life forms as members of the public? Come join three writers who have taken up the challenge of answering these questions in their recent books. Moderated by Iris Montero, the panel will feature Cornelia Dean (Against the Tide: The Battle for America's Beaches, 2005; Making Sense of Science, 2017); Mary Ellen Hannibal (Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, 2017), and Elizabeth Rush (Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore, forthcoming, June 2018).


March 6, 2018
Politics in the Humanities (PITH)
Cornel West
Salomon Center for Teaching
De Ciccio Family Auditorium
Main Green | 79 Waterman Street
5:30pm

Tickets are required.  Tickets will be available in mid-February.


March 9, 2018
"Getting into Print:  Working in Publishing and with Publishers"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
3:00 - 5:00pm 

Speakers include Laura Bannon (Senior Publisher, Journals, Oxford University Press), Timothy Barlett '90 (Executive Editor, St. Martin's Press), Susan Ferber '93 (Executive Editor, Academic and Trade Books, Oxford University Press). 

Part of a workshop series in the Department of History, "What History Looks Like:  The Skills and Work of the Historian."


March 21, 2018
Creative Medicine Lecture Series
"Palpable Emotions:  Using Narrative to Understand Motherhood, Medical School and Mourning"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30pm

Fourth-year medical student, Cia Panicker, talks about her journey of understanding the intangibles of medicine - pain, guilt, and hope. Using the lens of her literary work about mothers who've experienced serious maternal-fetal complications, she'll explore how creative narrative makes palpable these emotions.


April 6-7, 2018
Conference
"Earth(ly) Matters:  New Directions in Environmental Humanities"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

The conference convenes participants from a wide variety of fields that encompass Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, English, Gender Studies, History, New Media Arts, Philosophy, Political Theory, Religious Studies, and Social Sciences. Speakers include Stacy Alaimo (University of Texas, Arlington), Branka Arsić (Columbia University), Katherine Behar (Baruch College), Vera Candiani (Princeton University), Mark Cladis (Brown University), Gregory Cushman (University of Kansas), Amitav Ghosh (novelist and essayist), Macarena Gómez-Barris (Pratt Institute), Dale Jamieson (New York University), Sharon Krause (Brown University), Astrida Neimanis (University of Sydney), Adrian Parr (University of Cincinnati), and Kyle Powys Whyte (Michigan State University).


April 11, 2018
The Greg and Julie Flynn Cogut Institute Speaker Series
"War, Fiction, and the Ethics of Memory"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30pm 

Viet Thanh Nguyen's novel The Sympathizer (Grove/Atlantic, 2015) is a New York Times best seller and won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Nguyen is also the author of Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America (Oxford University Press, 2002), Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War (Harvard University Press, 2016), and the short story collection The Refugees (Grove Press, 2017). At the University of Southern California, Nguyen is the Aerol Arnold Chair of English and Professor of English, American Studies and Ethnicity, and Comparative Literature. Among other awards, he received fellowships from the Guggenheim and the MacArthur Foundations in 2017.


April 16
"Thinking with Resurgence" --CANCELLED
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

This talk will relay Anna Tsing’s proposition that we have to face the question of livability in capitalist ruins and this may mean, for us, academics, to accept that we are in a situation calling for William James’ speculative pragmatism, casting our lot with what might be possible against the probability of barbarity. The notion of resurgence, very different from a utopic return to a lost wisdom, offers no warrant, as witnessed by its reference to ecological but also to epidemiological studies. It signals however the way a new generation of activists invents new possibilities of living and thinking which might demand that we suspend our critical gesture and learn how to relay them with our own means, accepting what William James defined as the ‘great question’ associated with pragmatism: does what we relay‘with our additions, rise or fall in values? Are the additions worthy or unworthy?

Isabelle Stengers, professor of the Université Libre de Bruxelles, has written numerous books, among which have been published in English translation Order out of Chaos with Ilya Prigogine, A Critique of Psychoanalytical Reason with Léon Chertok, A  History of Chemistry with Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent, Power and Invention: Situating Science, The Invention of Modern ScienceCapitalist Sorcery : Breaking the Spell with Philippe Pignarre, Thinking with Whitehead, Cosmopolitics I and II, Women who Make a Fuss with Vinciane Despret and Catastrophic Times. Starting with the defence of the passionate adventure of physics against its enrolment as model of rationality and objectivity, she has developed the concept of an ecology of practices affirming a speculative constructionism in relation with the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze, Alfred North Whitehead and William James, and the anthropology of Bruno Latour.


April 19, 2018
"A Litany for Survival:  Black Lives Matter in the Age of Trump"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30pm 

Speaker, Frank Leon Roberts (New York University)


April 26, 2018
"Immediacy, Loss and Romantic Micro-melancholia"
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30pm

For all its investment in futurity and progress, romantic-period discourse is preoccupied with loss, frequently for a specific “object”—innocence, childhood, revolutionary promise—which is the basis, on many accounts, for a characteristic disenchantment or solipsism. But, speaker William Galperin (Rutgers University) notes, there is a melancholic strain to romanticism as well, issuing paradoxically in versions of immediacy, where loss is both nonspecific and time-stamped and where the “now,” however shocking or fragile, is suddenly—in anticipation of our present moment—the thing that matters. Such instances call for reading practices that are neither distant nor close but an amalgam of surface and depth, where self-regard prevails but to remind us, as only romanticism can, that loss is unique to the loser and phenomenologically, affectively, an acquisition.


April 27, 2018
Spring Concert
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
7:00 - 8:30pm

Pianist Benjamin Nacar '12 offers a program that includes Beethoven op. 101 and Chopin Ballade no. 4.



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